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by Timothy R. Phillips,Dennis L. Okholm

eBook Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World (Wheaton Theology Conference) download ISBN: 083081860X
Author: Timothy R. Phillips,Dennis L. Okholm
Publisher: IVP Academic; PRINT-ON-DEMAND edition (May 17, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 238
ePub: 1462 kb
Fb2: 1596 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Philip Kenneson, Brian Walsh and J. Richard Middleton, on the other hand, argue that key aspects of postmodernity can be appropriated to defend orthodox Chnstianity.

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Apologetics Christian Books & Bibles Ethics History & Criticism Literature . More by Dennis Okholm. Learning Theology Through the Church's Worship: An Introduction to Christian Belief. Dennis Okholm, Timothy R. Phillips.

Apologetics Christian Books & Bibles Ethics History & Criticism Literature & Fiction Movements & Periods Philosophy Postmodernism Religion Religion & Spirituality Religious Studies Theology. The Gospel in Black & White: Theological Resources for Racial Reconciliation. Welcome to the Family: An Introduction to Evangelical Christianity. Monk Habits for Everyday People: Benedictine Spirituality for Protestants.

Wheaton Theology Conference. Free delivery worldwide. Roger Lundin, Nicola Creegan and James Sire find the postmodern critique of Christianity and Western culture more challenging, but reject central features of it. Philip Kenneson, Brian Walsh and J. Richard Middleton, on the other hand, argue that key aspects of postmodernity can be appropriated to defend orthodox Christianity. An essential feature are trenchant chapters by Ronald Clifton Potter, Dennis Hollinger and Douglas Webster considering issues facing the local church in light of postmodernity.

Title: Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World. Previously he was associate professor of theology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. Publisher: IVP Academic. Publication Date: 1995. He is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA), and an oblate of a Benedictine monastery (Blue Cloud Abbey, SD). Timothy R. Phillips (P. Vanderbilt University) was associate professor of historical and systematic theology at Wheaton College, where he was instrumental in starting and organizing the annual Wheaton College Theology Conference.

Publication: Downers Grove : InterVarsity Press, 1995Description: 238 . SBN: 0-8308-1860-X

Publication: Downers Grove : InterVarsity Press, 1995Description: 238 . SBN: 0-8308-1860-X. Dewey: 239 C555Subject: Постмодернизм - Религиозный аспект - Христианство/ Postmodernism - Religious aspects - Christianity Апологетика, Apologetics. 239 C555 (Browse shelf). Includes bibliographical references and index. contains the complete texts.

in the Postmodern World (9780830818600) by Timothy Phillips

Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World (9780830818600) by Timothy Phillips. Princeton Theological Seminary) teaches in the department of theology and philosophy at Haggard School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University.

Evangelicals are beginning to provide analyses of our postmodern society, but little has been done to suggest an effective apologetic strategy for reaching a culture that is pluralistic, consumer-oriented, and infatuated with managerial and therapeutic approaches to life. This, then, is the first book to address that vital task. In these pages some of evangelicalism's most stimulating thinkers consider three possible apologetic responses to postmodernity. William Lane Craig argues that traditional evidentialist apologetics remains viable and preferable. Roger Lundin, Nicola Creegan and James Sire find the postmodern critique of Christianity and Western culture more challenging, but reject central features of it. Philip Kenneson, Brian Walsh and J. Richard Middleton, on the other hand, argue that key aspects of postmodernity can be appropriated to defend orthodox Christianity. An essential feature are trenchent chapters by Ronald Clifton Potter, Dennis Hollinger and Douglas Webster considering issues facing the local church in light of postmodernity. The volumes editors and John Stackhouse also add important introductory essays that orient the reader to postmodernity and various apologetic strategies. All this makes for a book indispensable for theologians, a wide range of students and reflective pastors.
Comments: (3)
Xangeo
"Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World" is a credible attempt to tackle a difficult issue--how to make the Gospel relevant and understandable to a world that has increasingly rejected the Enlightenment understanding of truth and rationality. As a multi-author text (Phillips and Okholm are the editors), some of the articles are more insightful than are others. (I found the ones by James Sire and William Lane Craig to be particularly useful.) However, all of the articles have something to commend them and therefore are worth reading. This itself is a selling point, since typically in works of this sort at least one or two of the contributions are close to worthless. Such is not the case with this book.

My only criticism is that the contributors for the most part spoke to the theoretical issues (which is important) while giving short shrift to the practical matter of how to address the concerns of the postmodern individual in specific one-on-one situations (which is equally if not more important). For those primarily interested in a more practical approach, one which primarily addresses this further concern, I would recommend Bearing Witness: Sharing the Gospel in a Post-Christian Age.
Rolling Flipper
Christian Apologetics in the Postmodern World is an edited volume composed of an introduction by the editors and ten independently authored articles.

The aim of the book is to open debate and present different points of view on the subject of effective apologetics in a postmodern context. The volume is varied in its scope from articulating the shift from Romanticism to postmodern thought to the approach of apologetics from the African American grain of theology. Each essay seeks to give an explanation for how apologetics ought to be done and usually have personal experiences to go along with their thoughts and findings. Even though the authors are presenting their case from their varied experiences and they don't often agree on a central approach to the issue at hand, they all seem to be devout followers of Christ and want to see the Church succeed in being the light to the whole world. The articles are written to a more academic audience.

The strength of the book is perhaps also its weakness. It is fantastic to get different threads of thought in one volume. William Lane Craig passionately advocates an adherence to Objective Truth. Philip Kenneson, however, approaches his apologetic with the title "There's no Such Thing as Objective Truth, and It's a Good Thing, Too." It is very enlightening to get different basis of thought. If you are looking for a concrete strategy on how "to do" apologetics in a postmodern context-you may need to look elsewhere.

I would highly recommend this book. It helped open up new avenues of thought. Also it bolstered my resolve with one the themes common to each article which is to be the church is the best apologetic because we embody the changing power of God and are the best resource we have to defend our faith.
Marr
Necessarily the idea that "objective truth" does not exist is going to strike a bitter chord with most Christians. I believe this book does a fine job of introducing the thinking Christian to what postmodernism truly is (not the denial of "truth" per se, but the denial that claims to truth can be made from an objective standpoint) and why the Christian should be concerned about it.
Of the essays in the book, James Sire's and Philip Kenneson's do the best work in representing either side of the view. Sire argues that postmodernism is nothing but relativism in a new package and should be treated accordingly. Kenneson argues that claims to "truth" are not necessarily wrong, but that we need to examine the method by which we arrive at those claims.
In the end, I'm sure, it is Sire's opinion that will be adopted by the vast majority of readers if only because it is a familiar one that most (if not all) Christians have been reared on. It's a shame that Kenneson will probably be dismissed as being "merely a relativist" simply because he is honest regarding the human condition--specifically its inability to interpret experiences apart from the experiences themselves. The model of thought he provides frees the church of the burden of "proving the truth" and instead allows it to return to its original mission of "living the truth."