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eBook Don't Bet on the Prince: Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England download

by Jack David Zipes

eBook Don't Bet on the Prince: Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England download ISBN: 1859280064
Author: Jack David Zipes
Publisher: Scolar Press (December 2, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1801 kb
Fb2: 1617 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr azw docx rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

This anthology of feminist fairy tales and critical essays acts as an. .A feminist look at fairy tales including short stories.

This anthology of feminist fairy tales and critical essays acts as an example of how the literature of fantasy and imagination can be harnessed to create a new view of the world. This book is split into three sections - tales for younger readers, tales for older readers, and criticism. The works have appeared in various sources elsewhere. If I were to recommend Don't Bet on the Prince: Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England that recommendation would be primarily for its small collection of contemporary fairy tales, only two of which I'd read before.

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Prince is not all bad-many stories are second rate (not just because of their feminist content, but because they are too far divorced from their source material to be effective retellings), Zipes is a constant irritation, but the other essays are thoughtful (if dated and brief) and there are some intriguing stories in the collection. But the volume aims to be more than this, and it's a lofty goal; that it fails to reach that goal makes it a disappointment.

Jack Zipes has put together the first comprehensive anthology of feminist fairy tales and essays to appear since the women's movement gained momentum in the 1960's. He has selected works by such gifted writers as Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, Tanith Lee, Jay Williams, Jane Yolen, Anne Sexton, Olga Broumas and Joanna Russ-all of whom, whether they consider themselves "feminists" or not, have written innovative stories which seek to break the classical tradition of fairy tales.

Jack David Zipes (born 1937) is an American academic and folklorist who has published and lectured on the subject of fairy tales, their evolution, and their social and political role in civilizing processes. According to Zipes, fairy tales "serve a meaningful social function, not just for compensation but for revelation: the worlds projected by the best of our fairy tales reveal the gaps between truth and falsehood in our immediate society

Similar books and articles. Collingwood, Fairy Tales and Totemism: A Historical Study on the Origins of European Religion (and Society). Someday My Prince Won't Come More Stories for Young Feminists.

Similar books and articles. Tales I Tell My Mother a Collection of Feminist Short Stories. John Karabelas - 2011 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (2):203-223. Images and Motifs in Children's Fairy Tales. Pat O'Connor - 1989 - Educational Studies 15 (2):129-144. Myth and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Women's Fiction. Susan Sellers - 2001. Rosemary Stones - 1988. Telling Tales Short Stories. Sara Maitland - 1983. Evil and Fairy Tales: The Witch as Symbol of Evil in Fairy Tales.

Grimm's Fairy Tales - Продолжительность: 3:09 The Princess and the Scrivener Recommended for you. 3:09. Зигзаг удачи - Продолжительность: 1:22:40 Киноконцерн "Мосфильм" Recommended for you. He has selected works by such gifted writers as Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, Tanith Lee, Jay Williams, Jane Yolen, Anne Sexton, Olga Broumas and Joanna Russ - all of whom, whether they consider themselves "feminists" or not, have written innovative stories which seek to break with the classical tradition of fairy tales.

If I were to recommend Don't Bet on the Prince that recommendation would be primarily for its small collection of.

If I were to recommend Don't Bet on the Prince that recommendation would be primarily for its small collection of contemporary fairy tales, only two of which I'd read before. The analyses and criticisms, while interesting and potentially educational for newbies, read somewhat like old news. So finding this collection of short stories, contemporary fairy tales with a zing of feminism, was very affirming for me. It's not that the men in the stories are all buffoons, or should be gotten rid of (the worst sort of "feminism").

book by Jack D. Zipes. com User, May 19, 2008. The book tells feminist fairy stories that are gentle with the guys too. Don't Bet On The Prince-Contemporary Feminist Fairy Tales in North America and England by Jack Zipes.

Jack Zipes has put together one of the comprehensive anthologies of feminist fairy tales and essays to appear since the women's movement gained momentum in the 1960s. He has selected works by such gifted writers as Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, Tanith Lee, Jay Williams, Jane Yolen, Anne Sexton, Olga Broumas and Joanna Russ - all of whom, whether they consider themselves "feminists" or not, have written innovative stories which seek to break with the classical tradition of fairy tales. The accompanying critical essays, by Marcia Lieberman, Sandra Gilbert, Susan Gubar and Karen Rowe, discuss how fairy tales play an important role in early socialisation, influencing the manner in which children perceive the world and their place in it even before they begin to read. "Don't Bet on the Prince" was created out of dissatisfaction with the dominant male discourse of traditional fairy tales and with the sexist social values and institutions which it supports. This book demonstrates how recent male and female writers, by looking at the classical literary fairy tale with new eyes, have changed the aesthetic constructs and social content of fairy tales in order to reflect the major changes in the roles of sex, gender, socialisation and education since the 1960s. It is an excellent example of how the literature of fantasy and imagination can be harnessed to create a new view of the world. "Don't Bet on the Prince" is for all those interested in questioning the traditional values and expectations by which our perceptions of ourselves are formed. It will be of special interest to those concerned with the feminist movement, women's studies and the growing feminist sensibility in fantasy literature. Its tales will also appeal to children, and the child in every adult.
Comments: (7)
Beazezius
I first read Don't Bet on the Prince roughly 20 years ago, and recently went searching for my copy (apparently loaned or lost). I bought a replacement copy and came to the realization that a lot has changed in 20 years.

My intent this time was to have some stories to read to my daughters that offered a counterpoint to the traditional/Grimm/Disney imaging of women in general and princesses in particular. Some of the stories are well above the elementary or middle school levels, while some others are appropriate as stories for children. Zipes acknowledges this by segmenting the stories into two groups, one for the young, and the other for the young at heart. Most are referential, though, in the sense that strong familiarity with the traditional tales make these more interesting. An additional section of feminist literary criticism follows.

To the end of stories for kids, I very much like "The Princess Who Stood on Her Own Two Feet," and "Prince Amilec." That said, there are most likely better anthologies of stories for children. As a bit of critical text, it certainly represents a step in the progression of feminist theory, just not the current one.
Lo◘Ve
Bought this book a number of years ago for my daughter. Recently purchased this issue for granddaughters. The message may be feminist, but men and boys would benefit from reading of young women approaching life's situations in a manner other than original fairy tales and children's books. Rather than caving in to the demands of men these women think for themselves. An excellent message that overshadows the helplessness of young women in original stories, but done in a lightweight manner.
Peles
The stories in the first section are entertaining, with that indescribable fairy tale sense of wonder and optimism. I am struggling to get into the second section, because too many of the stories don't have that sense of optimism that a good fairy tale should have, (according to things Zipes has written in his other books). One of the stories, by Jane Yolan, is more fantasy than fairy tale, and is downright tragic.

This might be a good book for the serious student of fairy tales or feminism, but I wouldn't read any of the stories in the second section to my children.
Katius
The book tells feminist fairy stories that are gentle with the guys too. Jack Zipes, the editor is, after all, a man. I've used the book with students, grandchildren, fellow feminists - all to a warm welcome. Highly recommended.
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In three sections (following a lengthy introduction), editor Zipes compiles three revised, purportedly feminist takes on traditional fairy tales: Feminist Fairy Tales for Young (and Old) Readers and for Old (and Young) Readers, 17 modern fairy tales from authors like Tanith Lee, Jane Yolen, and Anne Sexton among others, and four pieces of feminist literary criticism on fairy tales. That a work purports to be feminist, however, does not necessarily make it so. Or, rather, a work can claim to be feminist, can aim to be feminist, and still fall short of the mark--as is the case here. First, it's Zipes that drags down the anthology. In his overlong introduction and concluding critical essay, he's given to cumbersome academic dialog and bold leaps of reasoning, a tendency towards form (in place of content) which makes for inscrutable, unsubstantiated arguments. Those arguments are promising, but they beg clearer, more thorough address. The anthology's second weakness is the stories themselves. There are some gems--most provided by the authors mentioned above, and Carter's "The Donkey Prince" and Atwood's "Bluebeard's Egg" also appear on my list of favorites. But there are many stories which fail to push their feminist premises far enough, leaving them open to worrying commentary.

"In none of these tales is marriage a necessity or a goal for young women, rather it is a possibility which may or may not enter their plans. [...] In addition, the lives and careers of the young women are not telologically [sic] shaped by marriage (17)," writes Zipes in his introduction, yet in a surprising number of Prince's stories marriage is presumed--and in more, female energy is focused on male figures, roles, and relationships. The stories that don't fulfill heteronormative goals of romance, marriage, and childbirth often focus on that failure, mourning the sense of loss that accompanies it. For a purportedly feminist anthology, Prince has a surprisingly strong focus on men (even in the title!), and heteronormative standards are nearly inviolate. Perhaps I aim too high (and take too modern an approach) when I wish that Prince didn't constrain its feminism to heteronormative obligate male/female relationships; the fact that it does not, however, makes it limited in scope and depth. And then there's de Larrabeiti's story "Malagan and the Lady of Rascas," in which a husband has his wife made grotesque to force her to remain faithful, and when she does for many years remain faithful--and good, patient, and forgiving--he learns to be a decent human being. A story where men make decisions, women survive ill treatment without complaint or agency, and men reap the rewards of the experience is not feminist--certainly not feminist enough to fit a collection that totes the word so boldly on its cover.

Prince is not all bad--many stories are second rate (not just because of their feminist content, but because they are too far divorced from their source material to be effective retellings), Zipes is a constant irritation, but the other essays are thoughtful (if dated and brief) and there are some intriguing stories in the collection. But the volume aims to be more than this, and it's a lofty goal; that it fails to reach that goal makes it a disappointment. There are better feminist takes on fairy tales out there, even if they don't come in such proud packaging. I don't recommend this one.
roternow
This is such an amazing book. It's part of what lead me into my research into looking at strong female characters in folk tales. This book is a must for people who don't want to read stories about wishy washy princesses waiting for the prince, and scholars alike. I reccomend this book highly.
fire dancer
this is an excellent book. The stories are well written and varied in theme. I was captivated by the stories for young readers as well as the stories for old readers. buy this book for your children!
It includes feminist twists in the stories, but still has "gender assigned" stories...Do not buy this book if you have, like me, studied feminism in many ways. It will be sure to dissapoint you.
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