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eBook From Here to Infinity download

by Ian Stewart

eBook From Here to Infinity download ISBN: 0192832026
Author: Ian Stewart
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Revised, Subsequent edition (May 23, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1440 kb
Fb2: 1735 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lrf mbr mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

From Here to Infinity: A Guide to Today's Mathematics, a 1996 book by mathematician and science popularizer Ian Stewart, is a guide to modern mathematics for the general reader.

From Here to Infinity: A Guide to Today's Mathematics, a 1996 book by mathematician and science popularizer Ian Stewart, is a guide to modern mathematics for the general reader. It aims to answer questions such as "What is mathematics?", "What is it for " and "What are mathematicians doing nowadays?".

From Here to Infinity can be highly recommended t! o many readers, all of whom will find and take away something different, something unique to themselves. For the mathematically bored will come enthusiasm

From Here to Infinity can be highly recommended t! o many readers, all of whom will find and take away something different, something unique to themselves. For the mathematically bored will come enthusiasm. For the casual mathematician and armchair computer programmer will come some interesting ideas for a rainy day, and for those with more mathematical knowledge will come a wealth of new areas to explore and sources to refer to.

From Here to Infinity book. Ian Stewart also included some chapters which are completely absent in Devlin's book: informatics and data processing. The resemblance is probably necessary as both of those books are introductions to modern mathematics. Ian Stewart also included some chapters which are completely absent in Devlin's book: informatics and data processing

From Here to Infinity book.

Ian Stewarts book is a survey of the developments in mathematics over the last couple of years, allowing the reader . In another of his books designed to make mathematics popular, Ian Stewart takes us through some of the latest advances in mathematics.

Ian Stewarts book is a survey of the developments in mathematics over the last couple of years, allowing the reader to come to grips with cutting edge mathematics without the need to equip him or her -self with the technical apparatus normally required to cross this intellectual terrain.

According to From Here to Infinity, good mathematics has an air of economy and an element of surprise. Ian Stewart is Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University in England

According to From Here to Infinity, good mathematics has an air of economy and an element of surprise. One could easily make the same claim for this instructive, amusing, and sometimes mind-boggling book. Ian Stewart is Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University in England. His many books include Does God Play Dice?, The collapse of Chaos (with Jack Cohen), Game, Set and Math, and Fearful Symmetry: Is God a Geometer? (with Martin Golubitsky). He contributed to a wide range of newspapers and magazines, and writes the "Mathematical Recreations" column of Scientific American.

Read about the latest discoveries, including Andrew Wile's amazing proof of Fermat's Last Theorem, the newest advances in knot theory, the Four Colour Theorem, Chaos Theory, and fake four-dimensial spaces. See how simple concepts from probability theory shed light on the National Lottery and tell you how to maximize your winnings.

Ian Stewart, a professor of mathematics at the University of Warwick in England, crafts a series of letters to an imaginary correspondent named Meg, who . From Here to Infinity.

Ian Stewart, a professor of mathematics at the University of Warwick in England, crafts a series of letters to an imaginary correspondent named Meg, who contemplates a career in math and goes from high school to university, graduate work and finally tenure as a math professor. Offers good advice. description of the community of mathematics is true and appealing.

Good Book Guide show more. Good Book Guide show more. Ian Stewart is Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University.

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In this retitled and revised edition of The Problems of Mathematics, renowned mathematician Ian Stewart gives math buffs and non-technical readers--as well as students of the subject--the perfect guide to today's mathematics. This challenging and fascinating book includes three new chapters that cover the most recent developments in the mathematics field, including one on Kepler's sphere-packing problem, to which a solution has been at last announced after a wait of 380 years.Stewart, a particularly gifted mathematician and writer, shows us not only that math can be explained in everyday language, but that it can be downright fun as well. Puzzle solvers especially will delight in accounts of puzzles like Fermat's famous theorem, manifolds (a kind of mathematical origami in many dimensions), and the patterns in chaos. And what reader wouldn't want probability theory explained by demonstrating how to maximize one's lottery winnings? According to From Here to Infinity, good mathematics has an air of economy and an element of surprise. One could easily make the same claim for this instructive, amusing, and sometimes mind-boggling book.
Comments: (2)
Skunk Black
In another of his books designed to make mathematics popular, Ian Stewart takes us through some of the latest advances in mathematics. He gives a history of some of the world's finest mathematicians and trickiest problems before showing how they can (or can't) be solved. This book is not confined to theory though; the author applies the concepts he has described to such topics as computer public/private key encryption (as used in PGP) and the lottery to show how apparently abstract theory has a valid use, even if that use is discovered many years after the original theory.
The book goes into detail about each of the author's chosen topics. Whilst this detail is sometimes too complex for the layman to understand, it is useful for future reference and can provide ideas for some interesting computer programming exercises. The material is presented in such a manner that skipping some of the more technical maths doesn't interrupt the flow of the information.
The book represents great value for money. There is a lot of content here, and each chapter is relatively self-contained so that the work does not need to be read in order but can be dipped into. Good use is made of cross-referencing between the chapters though, which really helps to bind the book together.
The author makes further research beyond the scope of the book easily possible by giving names of mathematicians and scientists responsible for discoveries, along with a list of suggested material for further reading at the back of the book. There is also an index, which is useful for a volume of this size.
As well as being interesting from a mathematical point of view, the book is genuinely entertaining, which keeps the pages turning. The book is also inspiring, which is handy if you're a disillusioned student facing endless revision and maths exams. By showing where mathematics came from and where it is going, the author injects interest into what is often thought of as a stale subject.
From Here to Infinity can be highly recommended t! o many readers, all of whom will find and take away something different, something unique to themselves. For the mathematically bored will come enthusiasm. For the casual mathematician and armchair computer programmer will come some interesting ideas for a rainy day, and for those with more mathematical knowledge will come a wealth of new areas to explore and sources to refer to. This book thoroughly deserves all five stars.
Nettale
This is Stewart's finest popularisation. My favourite of all time (I have three well-thumbed copies in two different editions).
Why is this book so special? Well, firstly it benefits from Stewart's accomplished story telling and crystal clear mathematical explanations. Secondly, because it looks at the *unsolved* problems at the cutting edge of mathematics, whereas all his other texts cover either recreational math, or well-known fully-solved theories.
Each chapter studies a different problem, starting with the roots of the history of the topic; covering successes and embarrassing failures in the development of the subject; introducing personalities and concluding with a state-of-the art review, where he conveys the surprise and excitement of new discovery. Thrillingingly Stewart reports strange, glamorous and unexpected results from all areas of pure mathematics, and leaves us with an aching sense of mystery for those matters that still elude our grasp.
A total turn-on for the mathematically sensitive, this would be a special gift for an aspiring mathematician or a layman who has made good progress with the standard math popularisations.