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eBook Fundamentalism in America: Millennialism, Identity and Militant Religion (Tendencies Identities Texts Cultures EUP) download

by Philip H. Melling

eBook Fundamentalism in America: Millennialism, Identity and Militant Religion (Tendencies Identities Texts Cultures EUP) download ISBN: 0748609784
Author: Philip H. Melling
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; 1 edition (November 15, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1593 kb
Fb2: 1240 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

This important book challenges the idea that religious fundamentalism can adequately be understood as a paranoid, xenophobic faith. Philip Melling is Senior Lecturer in American Studies at the University of Wales, Swansea. He is author of Vietnam in American Literature (.

This important book challenges the idea that religious fundamentalism can adequately be understood as a paranoid, xenophobic faith. It demonstrates instead how it draws upon a long tradition of evangelical and millennialist scripture in its engagement with issues at the spiritual and ethical core of postmodernity in America. Hall,1990) and Man of Amman (Gomer, 1994). Библиографические данные.

oceedings{alismIA, title {Fundamentalism in America: Millennialism, Identity and . This important book challenges the idea that religious fundamentalism can adequately be understood as a paranoid, xenophobic faith.

oceedings{alismIA, title {Fundamentalism in America: Millennialism, Identity and Militant Religion}, author {Philip H. Melling}, year {1999} }. Philip H. Melling.

PDF This book explores the relationships between fundamentalist . America, South Asia and the Middle East that it can hardly be ignored. Christianity, whose authorities were usually hostile to activist millennialism, Aum's action orientation emanated from the prophet himself.

PDF This book explores the relationships between fundamentalist religious belief, political extremism and outbreaks of religiously inspired violence.

Concepts of fundamentalism as a response to exclusively modernist tendencies since the beginning of the twentieth century . Melling, Philip H. Fundamentalism in America: Millennialism, Identity and Militant Religion.

Concepts of fundamentalism as a response to exclusively modernist tendencies since the beginning of the twentieth century will therefore be questioned in this volume. Opening up a historical perspective reaching back to the early sixteenth century, several contributors begin to explore the rise of fundamentalisms at various points in history characterized by the experience of cultural change from the clash of innovative, or ng, tendencies (polyvalent) with what appears to be a re-actionary movement (monovalent).

See Philip H. Melling, Fundamentalism in America: millennialism, identity and militant religion (1999). As another scholar points out, "One of the major distinctives of fundamentalism is militancy. The militant aspect helps to explain the desire of fundamentalists to become active in political change" Ronald D. Witherup, Biblical Fundamentalism: What Every Catholic Should Know (2001) p 2. ^ "Militant" in Merriam Webster Third Unabridged Dictionary (1961) which cites "militant suffragist" and "militant trade unionism" as example.

Fundamentalism in America : Millennialism, Identity and Militant Religion.

Philip H. Melling (2001). Edinburgh University Press. p. 193. ISBN 978-0748609789

Philip H. ISBN 978-0748609789. The Peoples Temple movement began in the 1950s as an independent Pentecostal congregation of white and black working-class familie. ome argue it was initially a Christian sect that then became a new religious movement. Anthony B. Pinn (2009). African American Religious Cultures.

Tendencies, identities, texts cultures.

Edinburgh University Press. Tendencies, identities, texts cultures. 0748609776, 0748609784. 0748609776,0748609784,0748609776,0748609784. This item appears on. List

Fundamentalism usually has a religious connotation that indicates unwavering attachment to a set of irreducible beliefs.

Fundamentalism usually has a religious connotation that indicates unwavering attachment to a set of irreducible beliefs

I will argue that Protestant fundamentalism in America can be understood . No articles were designed as specific attacks on modernist tendencies, no. .

I will argue that Protestant fundamentalism in America can be understood best by viewing the movement through four distinct periods, or phases : (1) an irenic phase, which runs from approximately 1893–1919 and serves as a harbinger to fundamentalism proper ; (2) a militant phase, that runs from 1920–1936 and which encompasses the now famous nist controversies ; (3) a divisive phase from. These phases of fundamentalism cannot be examined without a grasp of recent historiography in the field

This important book challenges the idea that religious fundamentalism can adequately be understood as a paranoid, xenophobic faith. It demonstrates instead how it draws upon a long tradition of evangelical and millennialist scripture in its engagement with issues at the spiritual and ethical core of postmodernity in America. The author examines the contradictions of fundamentalism as they appear in prophecy, sermon, film and fiction, including work by Gore Vidal, Peter Matthiesen, Thom Jones, Alison Lurie and Pete Dexter. He shows, in an original reading, how scripture, race and politics have combined in the conservative opposition to the Clinton presidency in the writings of influential figures such as Pat Robertson, Salem Kirban and Hal Lindsey. Clinton's failure, in this view, had less to do with sexual depravity than his abandonment as a Southern Methodist of the Church's evangelising mission, so essential in fundamentalist belief to the advent of the millennium. In its wide-ranging consideration of the rhetoric of the 'New World Order', the literature of prophecy, Cold War films, tele-evangelism, cross-border texts and postnationalist writing, this book provides a vital and compelling account of the present crisis in religious and national identity in the United States.