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by David Allan

eBook A Nation of Readers: The Lending Library in Georgian England download ISBN: 0712349677
Author: David Allan
Publisher: British Library (January 15, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1725 kb
Fb2: 1106 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt lit doc docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

A Nation of Readers book.

A Nation of Readers book.

Request PDF On Jan 19, 2010, James Raven and others published A Nation of Readers: The Lending Library . Description based on issue (Aug. 1880); Electronic reproduction. National Library of Australia, 2010.

Description based on issue (Aug. Journal of Asian and African studies.

A Nation of Readers compellingly argues that the proliferation of library facilities greatly increased the quantity and . David Allan is reader in history at the University of St. Andrews and has held visiting fellowships at several universities, including Harvard and Yale.

David Allan is reader in history at the University of St.

Allan, David, A Nation of Readers: The Lending Library in Georgian England (London, 2008). Allan, David ‘Opposing Enlightenment: Revd Charles Peters’ Reading of the Natural History of Religion', Eighteenth-Century Studies, 38 (2005), 301–21. Allan, David, ‘A Reader Writes: Negotiating The Wealth of Nations In an Eighteenth-Century English Commonplace Book’, Philological Quarterly, 83 (2004), 207–33. Allan, David, ‘Some Notes and Problems in the History of Reading: Georgian England and the Scottish Enlightenment’, The Journal of the Historical Society, 3 (2003), 91–124.

2010 David Allan, University of St. Andrews, for the book A Nation of Readers: The Lending Library in Georgian England, (London: British Library, 2008). 2016 Cheryl Knott, University of Arizona, for the book Not Free, Not for All: Public Libraries in the Age of Jim Crow (University of Massachusetts Press, 2015).

Reading was one of the defining obsessions of Georgian England-serving as both passionate interest and the natural .

Reading was one of the defining obsessions of Georgian England-serving as both passionate interest and the natural focus for intensive criticism and controversy for the middle and upper classes of the day. It’s not surprising then that a proliferation of book lenders and booksellers would strike up a competition for the patronage of a generation of readers.

Home page, Staff/ David Allan. Allan, David A Nation of Readers: The Lending Library in Georgian England (Hardcover), British Library Publishing Division, 2007, 288 pp. ISBN 0712349677.

Электронная книга "Making British Culture: English Readers and the Scottish Enlightenment, 1740–1830", David Allan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Making British Culture: English Readers and the Scottish Enlightenment, 1740–1830" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Eliza Atkins Gleason Book Award. American Library Association, Library History Round Table.

Commonplace Books and Reading in Georgian England. Download (PDF). Читать. The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales, I. 940-1216. David Knowles, C. N. L. Brooke, Vera C. M. London.

Reading was one of the defining obsessions of Georgian England—serving as both passionate interest and the natural focus for intensive criticism and controversy for the middle and upper classes of the day. It’s not surprising then that a proliferation of book lenders and booksellers would strike up a competition for the patronage of a generation of readers. This pioneering volume on the history of reading in eighteenth-century England explores the origins, organization, and impact of book clubs, reading societies, and subscription and circulating libraries, as well as the opportunities increasingly offered to readers by a variety of other collections—including those provided by religious, educational, and recreational institutions. A Nation of Readers compellingly argues that the proliferation of library facilities greatly increased the quantity and diversity of texts available. It also suggests that the resulting circulation of books on a previously unimaginable scale made possible the creation of a substantial and broadly based reading public, thereby adding immeasurably to the cultural vitality that so distinguished Georgian England and left its mark on literary generations to come.