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by Laura Anna Stortoni,Mary Prentice Lillie,Gaspara Stampa

eBook Gaspara Stampa: Selected Poems (English, Italian and Italian Edition) download ISBN: 0934977372
Author: Laura Anna Stortoni,Mary Prentice Lillie,Gaspara Stampa
Publisher: Italica Press (September 29, 2008)
Language: English Italian
Pages: 272
ePub: 1970 kb
Fb2: 1953 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi azw lit docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

We can thank Laura Anna Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie for this excellent translation and study of Gaspara Stampa's poetry. Gaspara's poetry is timeless.

We can thank Laura Anna Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie for this excellent translation and study of Gaspara Stampa's poetry. - VIA, vol. 6, no. 1.

Laura Anna Stortoni’s most popular book is Gaspara Stampa: Selected Poems. Lucia Bertani Dell'oro (Contributor). Antonia Giannotti Pulci (Contributor). Women Poets of the Italian Renaissance: Courtly Ladies & Courtesans by. Vittoria Colonna

Gaspara Stampa (1523 – 23 April 1554) was an Italian poet.

Gaspara Stampa (1523 – 23 April 1554) was an Italian poet. She is considered to have been the greatest woman poet of the Italian Renaissance, and she is regarded by many as the greatest Italian woman poet of any age. Stampa's father, Bartolomeo, originally from Milan, was a jewel and gold merchant in Padua, where she was born, along with her siblings Cassandra and Baldassarre

Gaspara Stampa, Laura A. Stortoni (Translator).

Gaspara Stampa, Laura A. Mary P. Lillie (Translator). It includes an introduction to the poet and her work, a note on the translation, and provides the reader with notes to the poems, a bibliography, and a first-line index.

Gaspara Stampa (1523-54) is considered the greatest woman poet of the Italian Renaissance and is regarded by many as the greatest . Gaspara Stampa, Selected Poems. Mary Prentice Lillie. Series: Poetry in Translation.

Gaspara Stampa (1523-54) is considered the greatest woman poet of the Italian Renaissance and is regarded by many as the greatest Italian woman poet of any ag. . Published by: Italica Press, Inc. DOI: 1. 307/j.

Browse through Gaspara Stampa's poems and quotes. When Stampa was eight, her father died and her mother, Cecilia, moved to Venice with her children Gaspara, Cassandra, and Baldassarre; whom she educated to literature, music, history, and painting. 14 poems of Gaspara Stampa. Still I Rise, The Road Not Taken, If You Forget Me, Dreams, Annabel Lee. Gaspara Stampa was an Italian poet. Gaspara and Cassandra excelled at singing and playing the lute, possibly due to training by Tuttovale Menon. Early on, the Stampa household became a literary club, visited by many well-known Venetian writers, painters and musicians.

Gaspara Stampa, Laura Anna Stortoni, Mary Prentice Lillie.

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Likewise Tylus omits mentioning English translations of Stampa's poems that have appeared in various anthologies or collections.

Ed. Troy Tower and Jane Tylus. Stampa was lauded by her contemporaries above all as a virtuosa, a singer and musician. Her Rime were published after her death and did not become widely known. Nevertheless, as Tylus mentions, she was included in books that preceded Bergalli's, . Likewise Tylus omits mentioning English translations of Stampa's poems that have appeared in various anthologies or collections.

Gaspara Stampa (1523-54) is considered the greatest woman poet of the Italian Renaissance, and she is regarded by many as the greatest Italian woman poet of any age. A highly skilled musician, Stampa produced some of the most musical poetry in the Italian language. Her sonnets of unrequited love speak in a language of honest passion and profound loss. They look forward to the women writers of the nineteenth century and are a milestone in women's literature. This dual-language edition of selected poems presents, along with the Italian original, the first English translation of Stampa's work. It includes an introduction to the poet and her work, a note on the translation, and provides the reader with notes to the poems, a bibliography, and a first-line index. Dual-language poetry. Introduction, bibliography, first-line index.
Comments: (4)
Stick
In my opinion, these poems do not have much intrinsic merit; they are important for women's studies or an understanding of Renaissance taste or a survey of Petrach's influence, not for a study of brilliant literature. Her metaphors are cliche in the extreme, her story is not very inventive, and her style is heavily derivative of Petrarch. There are some poems which are witty or poignant or lyrical, but these moments of inspiration do little to improve the rest of the collection, which consists of undistinguished laments.
Goodman
I have to start with a warning: I like the poetry of Gaspara Stampa very much but I also read it in the original. With that note, I am afraid that I was most interested in this book simply so that I could have more copies of her work, copies that weren't photo-copies caged over the years I spent studying Italian at university. The translations are fine, not particular inspired but not terrible either. For the reader who does not know Italian, they do well expressing the meaning of the poetry if not it's particular genius. However as "A Reader" pointed out, Stampa's true brilliance comes out in the original. "A Reader" also made a few other good points when she mentioned Dacia Maraini, and I think La Maraini touches a certain truth of Italian literature. In short, after an exhaustive effort on my several visits to Italy, I have never once been able to find a newly publised collection of Stampa's work. Infact, I have yet to find any used collections of her work. (They must have existed at some point, and perhaps one day I will find one.) Worse, of the many Italian book sellers I spoke with, very very few had ever heard of this writer. Veronica Franca, the other and rather more famous courtesan poet, was saved from similar neglect perhaps first by Maraini's own writting and certainly by the much romanticized biopic, "Dangerous Beauty."

And so, in my rather round about way, I must conclude that if you enjoy Italian poetry, in particular that written during the Renaissance, this collection is more than worth it's price. Indeed it is very nearly priceless.
Tamesya
"Gaspara Stampa: Selected Poems", edited and translated by Laura Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie, is a dual-language (English and Italian) compilation of selected poems by a woman considered by many to be the best woman poet of the Italian Renaissance, even the greatest Italian woman poet of all times. Stampa's poems are very similar to Petrarch's poems to Laura, in that a lover (the poet) sings praises of the beloved, while simultaneously lamenting the heart break and loss that comes with this intense and unrequited love. What is so unique and rare about these 16th century poems is that the poet and lover is a woman (and of questionable status), and the object of disire is a man. Stampa's poems are filled with so much passion and emotion that anyone who has been in love will be able to relate to the universal emotions that Stampa expresses. One of my favorite poems is one that is brief and simple, yet conveys such a depth of feeling that one is left wondering how so much could be communicated in so few and such uncomplicated words. These are my favorite types of poems. Stampa explains why love is more deadly than death: "Your cruel arrow, Love,/ Is sharper and more dire/ Even than Death's own dart/ Because through Death one simply dies on time,/ While you, when you attack/ Can strike a thousand times, yet never slay./ So, Love, your piercing dart,/ Is deadlier than Death." Stampa's poems by no means speak to a specific, narrow audience. Her experiences and poems are not dated or defined by her time, but speak to anyone, especially any woman, just as much now as they did over 400 years ago. Likewise, this edition of Stampa's poems is not limited in its audience. Many may find this volume useful and interesting - from Renaissance scholars to literature students, to those interested in Women's Studies, from students of Italian to poetry lovers, to romantics. I would highly recommend this book to anyone.
Jugore
Gaspara Stampa's use of language is rather simple and concise. There are really no tortured words, or tortured phrasings or linguistic metaphors, just laments of longing. Some scholars dismiss her simple words as being overwrought with emotion, but this misses the point of what she is communicating. The intensity of infatuation, of having a crush, of unrequieted love that makes you desperate has never been better expressed. While her direct expression of feelings don't satisfy the intellectual pursuit of contemporary critics, it is not to this audience whom she is writting to. She writes to the heart. Since her poems were meant to be read out loud the impact of each of her poems should only be appreciated in its entirety, dissecting them line by line only disservices them. Read her if you want to re-kindle the embers of your heart.