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eBook Legends of Vancouver download

by E. Pauline Johnson,Robin Laurence

eBook Legends of Vancouver download ISBN: 1550545531
Author: E. Pauline Johnson,Robin Laurence
Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre Ltd (February 1, 1998)
Language: English
ePub: 1686 kb
Fb2: 1642 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit txt azw mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Emily Pauline Johnson (also known in Mohawk as Tekahionwake), commonly known as E. Pauline Johnson or just . See if your friends have read any of E. Pauline Johnson's books. E. Pauline Johnson, Robin Laurence.

Emily Pauline Johnson (also known in Mohawk as Tekahionwake), commonly known as E. Pauline Johnson or just Pauline Johnson, was a Canadian writer and pe. . Pauline Johnson’s Followers (12). in Six Nations Indian Reserve outside Brantford, Ontario, Canada.

Legends of Vancouver book. A much-loved Canadian classic, LEGENDS OF VANCOUVER takes the. A much-loved Canadian classic, LEGENDS OF VANCOUVER takes the reader back to a time long ago, before the city of Vancouver was built, when the land belonged to the Squamish people. These legends tell the stories behind many prominent natural features in and around Vancouver.

You can read Legends of Vancouver by E Pauline Johnson in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Emily Pauline Johnson (also known by her Mohawk stage name as Tekahionwake- pronounced dageh-eeon-wageh, literally: 'double-life') (10 March 1861-7 March 1913), commonly known as E. Pauline Johnson or just Pauline Johnson, was a Canadian p. Pauline Johnson or just Pauline Johnson, was a Canadian poet, author and performer who was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Pauline Johnson Memorial. Start your tour with a visit to the Emily Pauline Johnson (Takehionwake) memorial. The Legend of a Chief’s great love for his daughters.

Legends Of Vancouver. by E. Pauline Johnson. Strange South Carolina. Legends Of Vancouver - E. Foo Foo. Patrick Riot. YOU can see them as you look towards the north and the west, where the dream hills swim into the sky amid their ever-drifting clouds of pearl and grey. They catch the earliest hint of sunrise, they hold the last color of sunset.

Legends of Vancouver by E. Pauline Johnson (1862-1913). But scarcely any prefatory remarks are necessary. This book may well stand on its own merits

Legends of Vancouver by E. Vancouver & Victoria, . David Spencer, Limited, 1911. LEGENDS of VANCOUVER. This book may well stand on its own merits. Still, it may be permissible to record one's glad satisfaction that a poet has arisen to cast over the shoulders of our grey mountains, our trail-threaded forests, our tide-swept waters, and the streets and sky-scrapers of our hurrying city, a gracious mantle of romance. Vancouver takes on a new aspect as we view it through her eyes.

Legends of Vancouver. One fee. Stacks of books. by. Johnson, E. Pauline, 1861-1913. Vancouver ; Victoria : D. Spencer. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. a; thomasfisher; toronto. University of Toronto. Fisher - University of Toronto. Uploaded by AaronC on July 14, 2015.

Vancouver takes on a new aspect as we view it through her eyes. Chief Johnson was of the renowned Mohawk tribe, being a scion of one of the fifty noble families which composed the historical confederation founded by Hiawatha upwards of four hundred years ago, and known at that period as the Brotherhood of the Five Nations, but which was afterwards named the Iroquois by the early French missionaries and explorers.

A much-loved Canadian classic, LEGENDS OF VANCOUVER takes the reader back to a time long ago, before the city of Vancouver was built, when the land belonged to the Squamish people. These legends tell the stories behind many prominent natural features in and around Vancouver.
Comments: (3)
Yggfyn
Legends of Vancouver by Pauline Johnson is a charming compilation of Coastal Indian myths. It was a delight to read the tales about so many locations and attractions I grew up with: Siwash Rock, Lost Lagon, Coal Harbour, Point Grey and Deer Lake. Also included is a Native version of The Great Flood and a very interesting account of Britain's Prince Arthur of Connaught and the Iroquois, which I'm sure might be viewed as controversial today due it's description of the Iroquois support of the British crown. The writing reflects the racial sentiments of the day (1911).

As mixed race English and Iroquois, Johnson lives in both worlds and writes with authenticity and great love for the Native peoples. The prose is beautiful albeit a bit florid for today's tastes.

I learned a lot about the culture of the Coastal First Nations peoples as I previously didn't imagine our Coastal Indians using canoes, arrows and being as warlike as depicted in these tales.

The book would have been enhanced by photos of the various locations throughout the city and with illustrations of the mythical warriors, princesses, Chiefs and medicine men as well.

Legends of Vancouver should be required reading for all Vancouver schoolchildren.
Valawye
To start off my review, this is some of the most beautiful prose that I have ever read, and I don't usually say such things. It was nicely descriptive, but without going over into irritating, and I got an amazing sense of place, time, and ever character while reading.

Each story is not only the legend itself, but also the story of how the author learned the legend, which is something many authors attempt, but few ever succeed at, let alone as well as this author. It's like there are these little personal footprints along with each of the stories, giving you a glimpse not just of the society through the story, but also of the society through who told the story to the author, and where. It's amazing; I have no better words for it than that.

There is no active table of contents, and the one footnote is not linked.

The legends contained are:

The Two Sisters
The Siwash Rock
The Recluse
The Lost Salmon-Run
The Deep Waters
The Sea-Serpent
The Lost Island
Point Grey
The Tulameen Trail
The Grey Archway
Deadman's Island
A Squamish Legend of Napoleon
The Lure in Stanley Park
Deer Lake
A Royal Mohawk Chief
Iseared
I recently made my first trip to the city of Vancouver, and in preparation for the journey I wanted to read some literature on the area. I heard that Legends of Vancouver, by E. Pauline Johnson was the quintessential Vancouver book and one widely read among the locals. Published in 1911, this book is a collection of 15 short stories based on legends of the Native American tribes (or as they say in Canada, First Nations) of the British Columbian coast.

Johnson was born in Ontario, of mixed European and Mohawk Indian ancestry. She is not only the author but also the first-person narrator of these stories, in which she describes herself as an Iroquois. In a typical story, Johnson travels around the Vancouver area meeting various chiefs or tillicums (tribal members) of the Squamish, Haida, or other indigenous peoples of the area. These Indian acquaintances then grace her with one of the traditional legends of their people, usually related to a specific mountain, rock, or lake in the vicinity and how it came to be. As far as Indian legends go, there are no epics here. These are very brief and simplistic tales, almost like a Native American variation on Aesop's Fables. Each relates a tale of love, loyalty, bravery, or revenge, often concluding with God turning someone into a rock. Thus are explained the origins of such landmarks as Siwash Rock, Point Grey, Deadman's Island, the two mountains known as "the Lions," and more. The final story has nothing to do with Vancouver at all, but rather gives an account of Prince Arthur of England's visit to the Iroquois tribes of Ontario.

The Indian tales that serve as Johnson's raw material are underwhelming at times, but they are elevated considerably in quality and effect by the storytelling skills of the author. Johnson's writing bears a striking resemblance to the Indian stories of Jack London in their campfire atmosphere, but without all the machismo, the racism, and the gratuitous violence. Her descriptions of the natural environment are strikingly painted, and she displays a great deal of reverence for the local landscape. She also spins a good yarn, giving the reader a vivid glimpse into what life may have been like in Vancouver before the "Palefaces" arrived. There's never a surprise ending, but though the plots may be predictable the stories are often uplifting and inspirational in their honest and forthright illustrations of human nature. Johnson's opening remarks about Coastal Indian culture are frequently more fascinating than the stories themselves. She describes how these Indians value kindness above all qualities—even over strength, intelligence, and bravery; how they appreciate the value of a good mother more than the power of a great hunter or warrior; how they venerate the trees for all the gifts they provide; and how they have a strange fascination with Napoleon Bonaparte.

I can see how residents of Vancouver would be quite taken by these stories, for they deal in the lore of places and sites that they see every day. For outsiders, however, this is not an essential read by any means. Don't expect to gain any insight into the modern city or its history, or you'll be disappointed. Those who are predisposed to literature of the West, however—like the stories of London, Bret Harte, or Frank Norris—will appreciate Johnson's naturalistic storytelling and enjoy this picturesque look back at the early days of the Pacific Northwest.