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eBook Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium download

by Walter E. Kaegi

eBook Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium download ISBN: 0521814596
Author: Walter E. Kaegi
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (April 21, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 372
ePub: 1316 kb
Fb2: 1857 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit mbr mbr txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium will also enhance readers' knowledge of the Muslim-Arabic expansion .

Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium will also enhance readers' knowledge of the Muslim-Arabic expansion into Middle Eastern territory. Kaegi's work breaks considerable new ground by refuting many old, generally superficial views of Heraclius, while putting his considerable achievements firmly into the political, social, cultural, and military frame-work of his times. A meticulous narrative.

Emperor of the Romans. Walter Emil Kaegi (March 27, 2003). Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium. Cambridge University Press. p. 236. ISBN 978-0-521-81459-1. Solidus of Emperor Heraclius (aged 35–38). Purported letter sent by Muhammad to Heraclius, emperor of Byzantium; reproduction taken from Majid Ali Khan, Muhammad The Final Messenger Islamic Book Service, New Delhi (1998). In Surah 30, the Qur'an refers to the Roman-Sasanian wars as follows: 30:2 The Romans have been defeated 3 In the nearest land.

On Heraclius’ reigning, see KAEGI, Walter Emil (2003). Guilherme Queiroz de Souza. analyzed Italian manuscripts of the text and brought to light the name of a probable author, Nicephorus 11. 2 The importance of the myth of Heraclius in Medieval West appeared in the academic literature of the nineteenth century.

Walter E. Kaegi is Professor of History, The University of Chicago. He is the author of many books, including Byzantium and the Decline of Rome (1968), Byzantine Military Unrest 471-843 (1981), Army, Society and Religion in Byzantium (1982), Some Thoughts on Byzantine Military Strategy (1983), and Byzantium and the Early Islamic Conquests (1992, paperback 1995). Библиографические данные.

This book evaluates the life and empire of the pivotal yet controversial Byzantine emperor Heraclius (a. Heraclius' skills enabled him to capture and recapture important territory, including Jerusalem, Syria and Egypt.

This book evaluates the life and empire of the pivotal yet controversial Byzantine emperor Heraclius (ad. 610-641), a contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad. His stormy war-torn reign is critical for understanding the background to fundamental changes in the Balkans and the Middle East, including the emergence of Islam. Yet, they proved to be of little value when he confronted early Islamic conquests. Categories: History\Memoirs, Biographies.

Heraclius emperor of byzantium. PUBLISHED BY THE PRESS SYNDICATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE The Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1RP, United Kingdom. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS The Edinburgh Building, Cambridge cb2 2ru, UK 40 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011-4211, USA 477 Williamstown Road, Port Melbourne, VIC 3207, Australia. Ruiz de Alarco´n 13, 28014 Madrid, Spain Dock House, The Waterfront, Cape Town 8001, South Africa. C Walter E. Kaegi 2003.

Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium book. First, there is the writing of the book. It begins well enough – even if the discussion of possible Armenian origins soon outstays its welcome.

This book evaluates the life and empire of the pivotal yet controversial and poorly understood Buzantine emperor Heraclius (AD 610 641), a contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad. His stormy and war-torn reign is critical for understanding the background to fundamental changes in the Balkans and the Middle East, including the emergence of Islam, at the end of antiquity. He respectievely captured and recaptured important swathes of territory, including Jerusalem and Syria and Egypt.

Monks and Laymen in Byzantium, 843–1118. New York: Cambridge University Press.

This book evaluates the life and empire of the pivotal yet controversial Byzantine emperor Heraclius (ad. 610-641), a contemporary of the Prophet Muhammad. His stormy war-torn reign is critical for understanding the background to fundamental changes in the Balkans and the Middle East, including the emergence of Islam. Heraclius' skills enabled him to capture and recapture important territory, including Jerusalem, Syria and Egypt. Yet, they proved to be of little value when he confronted early Islamic conquests.
Comments: (7)
Giamah
First off this is the best book out there on Heraclius. Second, that's a very sad thing. I don't know what's wrong with Walter Kaegi because he's a brilliant historian but he cannot write for squat. This book is probably the most disorganized and disjointed book I've ever read. That bits of brilliance still peek through is a testament to the depths of his scholarship but would a little editing really have hurt? It's over 300 pages long so it's not like it was done so quickly it didn't have time to be reviewed before publication. The number of times that this book repeats itself is horrifying. Not just a summary either, Kaegi actually includes the same material multiple times throughout the book. Between the repeats the text is dense and confusingly worded with sentences that need to be translated. I have to wonder, is English this man's native language? Why didn't he have a proofreader go over it before he published it. A little bit of editing could have made this book a masterpiece.

Good news though: once you get past the difficult wording and the repeated information the information is quite solid and insightful. Of particular interest is the discussion of the importance of intelligence in Byzantine warfare and the strength of North Africa during the 7th Century. This is good information and displays a solid analysis of the facts. So there are some real gems here that make it worth picking your way through the entirely unnecessarily complicated text. Also of interest are the slim facts presented dealing with Heraclius' personality. The man doesn't seem to have been a particularly nice man which wouldn't be a surprise except for the way he's been romanticized over the years. The account is not lacking in sympathy however. It would take a pretty heartless biographer to feel nothing when confronted with the tribulations that confronted Heraclius during his time as Emperor. The book is not really a biography in the strictest sense since most of Heraclius' life outside his actions as Emperor is rather obscure. Kaegi wrote two other books on the Arab conquest, Byzantium and the Early Islamic Conquests and Muslim Expansion and Byzantine Collapse in North Africa. I haven't read the second one but the first one is a more detailed look at the events in Syria that are described fairly briefly in this book. If you liked this book then I can recommend that one for sure. I'll check out the third one but I suspect it will be more of the same.

Those looking for a popular history of the time would be better suited reading Geoffrey Regan's The First Crusader. I can't say that's a great book either but it is more easy to understand. If you want a serious and detailed look at the Emperor's life then this book here is your best bet. Hopefully someday someone will write a masterpiece on Heraclius. Until then this is the best you're gonna get.
Nirn
Readers with a special interest in seventh-century Byzantium will find that Kaegi has saved them much work. By extracting and synthesizing the best from the assortment of contemporary and later works on this period, the author has provided a comprehensive as well as deeply probing historical analysis. Even better, his frequent footnotes and ample bibliography point the reader to a variety of primary and secondary sources. Kaegi's work is therefore a springboard toward understanding this complex, tumultuous, and ultimately tragic era in Byzantine history.

Of course, as the title promises, the narrative centers on Herakleios, but his life is itself a study in Byzantine political and military history. Kaegi paints for the reader a thorough portrait of this remarkable emperor and the incessant struggles that plagued his reign.

All that said, I do have to agree with those reviewers who criticize Kaegi's writing style. Frankly, one has to be genuinely interested in the subject matter in order to get through this book. Kaegi's sentence structure is often clumsy, and his division of paragraphs sometimes appears to defy logic. Particularly curious - especially for a historian - is his frequent omission of the pluperfect where this tense would seem to be required. Also, as one reader has remarked, Kaegi's speculations sometimes become annoyingly lengthy and even repetitive. One needs a fair amount of patience to read through some of the chapters.

However, none of the shortcomings in Kaegi's writing should discourage devotees of Byzantine history taking up this well-researched work.
Macill
This is a good sound academically written book. It addresses a little known personality whose life reads like a Greek tragedy; triumph, defeat, triumph again and finally ignominous failure. Keagi has, I'm sure, mined the available ancient texts but the repetition of his speculations, naturally without recorded foundations, does get a bit tedious. Still, he makes a convincing case that Heraclius was no First Crusader, as another book on this emperor implies. That was simply because the Byzantines did not quite understand the religious implications of the Muslim movement in the beginning. I recommend this book for all history buffs of this era and this empire.