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eBook Slavic Sins of the Flesh: Food, Sex, and Carnal Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) download

by Ronald D. LeBlanc

eBook Slavic Sins of the Flesh: Food, Sex, and Carnal Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction (Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies) download ISBN: 1584657677
Author: Ronald D. LeBlanc
Publisher: New Hampshire (June 30, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 356
ePub: 1639 kb
Fb2: 1948 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf lrf lrf mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

This remarkable work by Ronald D. LeBlanc is the first study to appraise the representation of food and sexuality in the nineteenth-century Russian novel

This remarkable work by Ronald D. LeBlanc is the first study to appraise the representation of food and sexuality in the nineteenth-century Russian novel. The treatment of carnal desire in these renowned works of fiction stimulated a generation of young writers to challenge Russian culture’s anti-eroticism, supreme spirituality, and utter disregard for the life.

This remarkable work by Ronald D. LeBlanc is the first study to appraise the representation of food and sexuality .

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Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction, Ronald D. LeBlanc Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies, Volume 10, pp. .

Slavic Sins of the Flesh: Food, Sex and Carnal Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction, Ronald D. LeBlanc. Durham,nh: University of New Hampshire Press, 2009. Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies, Volume 10, pp 101-102; doi:10.

Becoming Modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies. Durham: University of New Hampshire Press, 2009. Recommend this journal.

Analysis of nineteenth century travel writing in British colonies of the South Seas demonstrates how these texts may . LeBlanc, Ronald D. 2009. Slavic sins of the flesh: Food, sex, and carnal appetite in nineteenth-century Russian fiction

Analysis of nineteenth century travel writing in British colonies of the South Seas demonstrates how these texts may be considered colonial/ imperial discourse rather than just touristic documents alone. Colonial travel writing of this period typically presents Western European prac- titioners (usually the authors themselves) drawing moral assessments of native colonial cultures from journeys that become part vacation, part civic duty. Slavic sins of the flesh: Food, sex, and carnal appetite in nineteenth-century Russian fiction. Durham: University Press of New England.

Slavic Sins of the Flesh: Food, Sex, and Carnal Appetite in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction. Ghostly Paradoxes: Modern Spiritualism and Russian Culture in the Age of Realism by Ilya Vinitsky (pp. 365-366). Series: Becoming modern: New Nineteenth-Century Studies by Ronald D. LeBlanc (pp. 357-358).

This work by Ronald D. Saved in: Main Author: LeBlanc, Ronald Denis.

On these shores blagodarnost’ to Anna Brodsky (and Clava) for astute reads and precious communal apartment lore; and to Alexander Genis for his erudition and passion-and epicurean feats. This book is imagined as a meal that spans decades of the Soviet experience. Our real meals wouldn’t mean much without the company of Irina Genis, Andrei and Toma Zagdansky, and Alex and Andrea Bayer

This remarkable work by Ronald D. LeBlanc is the first study to appraise the representation of food and sexuality in the nineteenth-century Russian novel. Meticulously researched and elegantly and accessibly written, Slavic Sins of the Flesh sheds new light on classic literary creations as it examines how authors Nikolay Gogol, Ivan Goncharov, Grigorii Kvitka-Osnovyanenko, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Lev Tolstoy used eating in their works as a trope for male sexual desire. The treatment of carnal desire in these renowned works of fiction stimulated a generation of young writers to challenge Russian culture's anti-eroticism, supreme spirituality, and utter disregard for the life of the body, so firmly rooted in centuries of ideological domination by the Orthodox Church.
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