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eBook Fiction against History: Scott as Storyteller download

by James Kerr

eBook Fiction against History: Scott as Storyteller download ISBN: 052103356X
Author: James Kerr
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 26, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 156
ePub: 1153 kb
Fb2: 1718 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf mobi lrf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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Fiction against History:.

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The bride of Lammermoor: history as dreamwork - Redgauntlet: the historical romance as metafiction.

Walter Scott was acutely conscious of the fictionality of his historical novels. This contradiction, reflected in Scott's generic mixture of romance and realism, remains unresolved, even.

Fiction against history. Scott as storyteller. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Fiction against history from your list? Fiction against history. Published 1989 by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York.

Personal Name: Kerr, James, 1953-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge ; New York All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Fiction against history : Scott as storyteller, James Kerr. Cambridge ; New York. Cambridge University Press, (c)1989. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Fiction Against History: Scott as Storyteller. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Scott, Chaucer, and Medieval Romance: A Study in Sir Walter Scott’s Indebtedness to the Literature of the Middle Ages. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1987. Shaw, Harry E. The Forms of Historical Fiction: Sir Walter Scott and His Successors. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1983.

Fiction Against History : Scott as Storyteller.

Walter Scott was acutely conscious of the fictionality of his "historical" narratives. Assuming Scott's keen awareness of the problems of historical representation, James Kerr reads the Waverley novels as a grand fictional project constructed around the relationship between the language of fiction and the historical reality. Scott deliberately played fiction and history off against one another; and we can see throughout his novels a tension between the romancer, recasting the events of the past in accordance with recognizably literary logics, and the historian, presenting an accurate account of the past. This contradiction, reflected in Scott's generic mixture of romance and realism, remains unresolved, even in the most self-conscious of his works. It is in this interplay of fiction and history that Professor Kerr identifies the rich complexity of the Waverley novels.