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eBook Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years download

by Red Smith

eBook Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years download ISBN: 1566632897
Author: Red Smith
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (February 8, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1164 kb
Fb2: 1600 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt lrf lit azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Red Smith on Baseball is as essential to a good sports library as any single book can b. A must for baseball fans.

From Publishers Weekly. The Trojan War had Homer. Baseball had Red Smith. Makes a great gift, even as an e-book.

Red Smith on Baseball book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

great baseball writer reminiscences. Published by Thriftbooks. The subtitle indicates for whom this book will have the greatest appeal: "The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years. com User, 11 years ago. Red Smith was one of New York's premier baseball writers. His career spanned the period from 1941 to 1981. He was in his prime in the 1950s and 1960s when I was a avid baseball (Yankee) fan and I read all the sports columns particularly those in the New York Times or the Herald Tribune. Included are 167 of Smith's best columns (written during the years 1941-1981) which were syndicated in almost 300 newspapers throughout the United States.

Red Smith's writing is recognized as the best in the field.

Baseball Essays & Writings. Red Smith on Baseball : The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years. Red Smith's writing is recognized as the best in the field. Here is a selection of his most memorable columns-175 of them, from 1941 to 1981. offers lasting lessons about matters journalistic and literary.

Ira Berkow: Red: A Biography of Red Smith, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE, 2007. Phyllis Smith: Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years, Ivan R. Dee, Chicago, IL, 2000. Walter "Red" Smith at the SABR Bio Project. php?title Red Smith (writer)&oldid 1060082".

Walter Wellesley "Red" Smith (September 25, 1905 – January 15, 1982) was an American sportswriter. Smith’s journalistic career spans over five decades and his work influenced an entire generation of writers. Writing in 1989, sportswriter David Halberstam called Smith "the greatest sportswriter of the two eras.

Red smith on baseball. The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years. Although Smith covered sports from 1926 to 1981, this collection only includes his writings from 1940 through the end of. his career. The earlier years in this period-from the 1946 season (when baseball returned from WWII) to the late 1950s-are. remembered by many fans as the golden era of the game, and Smith’s coverage of it stands to this day as some of the best. sportswriting ever penned.

The Head Game: Baseball Seen From the Pitcher's Mound By ROGER KAHN A veteran baseball writer surveys some of. .

The Head Game: Baseball Seen From the Pitcher's Mound By ROGER KAHN A veteran baseball writer surveys some of the great pitchers in the history of the game. Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years By RED SMITH A Red Smith compendium, with special emphasis on the golden age of the Yankees, Giants and Dodgers. Past Time: Baseball as History By JULES TYGIEL How each American generation has reinvented baseball to fit new perceptions.

Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years (2000). By Red Smith It's hard to argue with this book's subtitle, even if the bulk of the 175 columns collected here hail from the 1940s and '50s

Red Smith on Baseball: The Game's Greatest Writer on the Game's Greatest Years (2000). By Red Smith It's hard to argue with this book's subtitle, even if the bulk of the 175 columns collected here hail from the 1940s and '50s. Red Smith packed more insight, humor, wit, and dazzling wordplay into every one his New York newspaper columns than most sports bloggers manage in an entire season. 19 of 20. 1. Five Seasons: A Baseball Companion (1977) by Roger Angell.

Red Smith's writing is recognized as the best in the field. Here is a selection of his most memorable columns―175 of them, from 1941 to 1981. His prose...offers lasting lessons about matters journalistic and literary. ―Robert Schmuhl, University of Notre Dame. The most admired and gifted sportswriter of his time.... Red Smith's work...tended to be the best writing in any given newspaper on any given day. ―David Halberstam, New York Times Book Review
Comments: (7)
Saithinin
If you are a fan of baseball and of good writing, then you already have this book. If for some reason it's escaped your attention, it's the perfect antidote for post-World Series withdrawal. There is no need to repeat all the good things said about this man as a writer, so I'll limit myself to a few observations. The choice of columns documents Red's contributions to the cults of Dimaggio and Stengel. There are also several columns about the last game of a WS, and it's interesting to see how much space he used in short columns to come up with new descriptions of the pile-up on the mound after the last pitch. Finally, two quibbles: this book was not proof-read, it was spell-checked. That's a disgrace to a writer as careful as Red. And the cover photo appears to be Dodger Stadium, which, considering the columns inside the book about Walter O'Malley's abandonment of Brooklyn, is ironic to put it mildly. These are just irritations, though. Overall, this is a must-have in a baseball collection.
Deeroman
Red Smith is of an era when sportswriting was literature, when these writers took real pride in their language and tone-and Smith is the top of the heap. A must for baseball fans. Makes a great gift, even as an e-book.
Quashant
You can't go wrong picking up a baseball book by one of the game's greatest writers. Smith made you smile, laugh out loud and think.
WOGY
very good...a little dry, but still great pieces from the forties in date order up to the 70's....great pieces of history. book arrived in great condition
Binar
Brilliant, moving writing. I've given copies to many friends in the past few years.
Makaitist
Many still call Red Smith (1905-1982) the best baseball columnist that ever lived. This collection of his top baseball writing from 1941-1981 shows Smith in his usual from; literate, knowledgeable, and ever cherishing those ninety feet between the bases. Readers come away from a Smith column better informed about the game, its personalities, even history and current events. Having written mostly for newspapers in Philadelphia and New York, Smith's columns are weighted towards East Coast baseball from the 1940-50's, when the national pastime was undisputed king. There are pieces about the Brooklyn Dodgers, New York Giants, Indians, Yankees, Leo Durocher, Joe DiMaggio, Ted Williams, Willie Mays, Casey Stengel, Bob Feller, Ernie Banks, etc. A general knowledge of baseball history is helpful as you'll see references to such long-gone entities as the Boston (Braves) and Philadelphia (Athletics). Recounting Babe Ruth's funeral, Smith writes of ex-teamates sweltering in a church pew in the August heat. "I'd give anything for a cold beer right now," whispered one. "So would the Babe," came the reply. Later, Smith sided with Curt Flood as that center fielder dared request the universal right of common laborers to negotiate with all potential employers - baseball's arrogant refusal spurred Flood's lawsuit which, although unsuccessful, helped usher in arbitration and free agency. Ironically, Smith refers repeatedly to "rounders," but I recall no informing note that baseball is believed to have evolved from this English children's game. Red Smith is gone but hardly forgotten, and younger fans can experience his treasured prose in these easy-reading pages.
Malann
Now it is done. Now the story ends. And there is no way to tell it. The art of fiction is dead. Reality has strangled invention. Only the utterly
impossible, the inexpressibly fantastic, can ever be plausible again.
-Last Chapter (October 4, 1951)
That is perhaps the most famous opening of any column in the history of journalism, and deservedly so. In fact, as you read this extraordinarily fine
collection of Red Smith's baseball writings, it is remarkable to realize just how many of his lines and phrases you recognize. Of course, when Smith
was a sportswriter, the sports page often contained the best writing in the paper. Today our image of journalists is absurdly inflated by Watergate and
the generation it inspired, but watch a movie from the '30s or 40s (say The Front Page) and you'll see just how low was the esteem they were held in.
But the sports guys had plum jobs so the position attracted truly talented men, from Damon Runyan to Ring Lardner to Paul Gallico to Smith himself.
Through some happy confluence of the stars Smith wrote for The New York Herald Tribune during the period when New York City not only had
three baseball teams but three very good baseball Writing on deadline teams : the 1940s and 50s versions of the Yankees; Dodgers; and Giants. This
book, though it covers other decades too, draws heavily from this period, which has not suffered from inattention over the years, but it is Smith's
descriptions of what happened (as with the opening line above) that remain in our minds. Here's another of my favorites, written on October 4, 1947,
after Cookie Lavagetto and the Dodgers had broken up a Floyd Bevens no-hitter to beat the Yankees and win the World Series :
The unhappiest man in Brooklyn is sitting up here in the far end of the press box. The 'V' on his typewriter is broken. He can't write either
Lavagetto or Bevens.
Even writing on a daily deadline, Smith managed to toss off great lines like that in nearly every column. There are links to a fair sampling of his
pieces below and the book is most highly recommended.
GRADE : A+
Red Smith was one of New York's premier baseball writers. His career spanned the period from 1941 to 1981. He was in his prime in the 1950s and 1960s when I was a avid baseball (Yankee) fan and I read all the sports columns particularly those in the New York Times or the Herald Tribune. The very first column about Mickey Owen's dropping Heinrich's third strike is a gem and a great choice to start out with. The articles are in a chronological order by decades. While there is some coverage of the 1970s and 1980s over half the book covers articles from the 40s and 50s and well over two thirds of it covers through the 60s. He likes to quote Casey Stengel who had many gems to include.
This is great for Yankee fans as brings back memories of the teams of the 50s and the way they were managed.