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by Thomas Docherty

eBook Postmodernism: A Reader download ISBN: 0231082215
Author: Thomas Docherty
Publisher: Columbia University Press (April 15, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 257
ePub: 1870 kb
Fb2: 1793 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Postmodernism: A Reader gathers in one volume a comprehensive selection of articles, essays and statements by leading figures - among them Leotard . Thomas Doherty is professor of english at Trinity College, Dublin.

Postmodernism: A Reader gathers in one volume a comprehensive selection of articles, essays and statements by leading figures - among them Leotard, Habermas, James on, Baudrillard, Ego, and Forty - writing across the divergent terrains on which the struggles over postmodernism are taking place: In the fields of philosophy and politics, in the artistic and cultural avant-garde, architecture and urbanicity, feminism and ecology, an. He is the author of Reading (Absent) Character; John Donne Undone; On Modern Authority; and After Theory: rxism.

Postmodernism: A Reader. Columbia University Press, 1993 - 528 sayfa. Postmodernism: A Reader gathers in one volume a comprehensive selection of articles, essays, and statements by leading figures - among them Lyotard, Habemas, Jameson, Baudrillard, Eco, and Rorty - writing across the divergent terrains on which the struggles over postmodernism are taking place: in the fields of philosophy and politics, in the artistic and cultural avant-garde, architecture and urbanicity, feminism. and ecology, and in the Third world. Routledge, 1 Tem 2016 - 540 sayfa. This reader provides a selection of articles and essays by leading figures in the postmodernism debate. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor?

Postmodernism: A Reader gathers in one volume a comprehensive selection of articles, essays and statements by leading figures - among them Leotard .

Docherty Postmodernism a Reader - Free ebook download as Word Doc . oc), PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or view presentation slides online. Discover everything Scribd has to offer, including books and audiobooks from major publishers. Docherty Postmodernism a Reader. Uploaded by. Den Tovic.

Bratislava: Slovenský spisovateľ, Docherty, Thomas, ed. Postmodernism: A Reader. Salamanca: Spanish Association for American Studies, Durusoy, Gertrude. A Comparative Study of Books for Children as Popular Culture. New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo, Singapore: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 3 Durán, Isabel. The Power of (Auto)Biography in Recent Literary Studies. Power and Culture in America: Forms of Interaction and Renewal. Eds. Buken, Gulriz, Raw, Laurence, and Isci, Gunseli Sonmez. Izmir: The British Council in Association with the American Studies Association of Turkey and Ege University, Eco, Umberto.

This reader provides a selection of articles and essays by leading figures in the postmodernism debate.

Postmodernism a Reader. Similar books and articles. This article has no associated abstract. Poststructuralism in Continental Philosophy. Added to PP index 2015-02-13.

DOCHERTY, Thomas (e. Postmodernism: A Reader The Cultural Studies Reader. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester, 1993. DURING, Simon, ed. The Cultural Studies Reader. The End of History and The Last Man. London: Free Press, 1992. Postmodernity, Ethics and the Novel: From Leavis to Levinas.

The arguments over postmodernism are among the most important intellectual debates of our time. Going beyond the poststructuralist controversy in its interdisciplinary scope, postmodernism questions the fundamental civil, political, ethical, and cultural criteria that make criticism and theory available, necessary, legitimate, or, indeed, even possible. But given that the key texts are widely scattered, the broad range of arguments remains relatively unknown.Postmodernism: A Reader gathers in one volume a comprehensive selection of articles, essays, and statements by leading figures -- among them Lyotard, Habemas, Jameson, Baudrillard, Eco, and Rorty -- writing across the divergent terrains on which the struggles over postmodernism are taking place: in the fields of philosophy and politics, in the artistic and cultural avant-garde, architecture and urbanicity, feminism and ecology, and in the Third world. The material assembled here enables a serious and rigorous consideration of the question "Are we at -- and should we endore -- the end of modernity?"
Comments: (4)
Kigabar
Item was delivered promptly and was as described
Jerdodov
Some pages seem to have been omitted. There's a random page 37 inserted after page 31, and no pages 32-36 at all.
Mmsa
The editor, Thomas Docherty (a professor of English) wrote in the Preface to this 1993 collection of essays and other brief writings, “We are not at the end of history; we are rather at the beginning of a rethinking of modernity, a rethinking of the world under the sign of postmodernism. Yet although the term ‘postmodernism’ has become one of the most insistently used terms in the cultural debates of recent years, it is a term which has often been used with a great deal of imprecision… The central rationale for this anthology is to indicate the enormous and eclectic body of interests upon which the postmodern debate has made a significant mark. The gathering of pieces will also reveal how philosophically serious and difficult much of the argument it… It is thus a good moment to gather together in one volume a diverse and extensive body of writings on the subject which have shaped the varied debates.”

The authors/artists in this anthology include Jean-Francois Lyotard, Jürgen Habermas, Jean Baudrillard, Umberto Eco, Michael Nyman, Richard Rorty, and many others. The writings are grouped together in sections such as “Aesthetic and Cultural Practices,” “Architecture and Urbanicity,” “Politics,” “Feminism,” and more.

Docherty wrote in his Introduction, “reconsiderations of culture in terms of the relation between the aesthetic and the political come to their fullest development in the more recent work of [Fredric] Jameson and Lyotard. But it should immediately be noted that a deep formative influence lying behind much of the contemporary debate is the legacy of the Frankfurt School… to which I shall return in more detail below. For present purposes, the salient fact is that aesthetic postmodernism is always intimately imbricated with the issue of a political postmodernism.” (Pg. 3) He adds, “The name for this aestheticisation of the political is ‘representation.’ In the postmodern, representation, as both a political and an aesthetic category, has come under increasing pressure…” (Pg. 14)

Lyotard observes in one of his essays, “Postmodern architecture finds itself condemned to undertake a series of minor modifications in a space inherited from modernity, condemned to abandon a global reconstruction of the space of human habitation. The perspective then opens onto a vast landscape, in the sense that there is no longer any horizon of universality, universalization, or general emancipation to greet the eye of postmodern man, least of all the eye of the architect. The disappearance of the Idea that rationality and freedom are progressing would explain a ‘tone,’ style, or mode specific to postmodern architecture. I would say it is a sort of ‘bricolage’: the multiple quotation of elements taken from earlier styles or periods, classical and modern; disregard for the environment; and so on.” (Pg. 47)

Another essayist suggests, “Analysis of postmodernity, however conscientious, must bear the same ‘until further notice,’ incomplete character, as the traditional theories of modernity once did; constructed from within modernity, they perceived the latter as a yet unfinished, and hence organically open-ended, process. Analysis of postmodernity cannot be anything more than a mid-career report.” (Pg. 139)

An essayist reviews the position of philosopher Arthur Danto: “modernist art became energized by an internal ‘logic’ necessarily progressing towards the revelation of art’s real essence---an essence that would not be assimilable in terms of other forms of communication. In Warhol’s Pop Art, this progression issues in its logical culmination. The essence of art is, in effect, declared as institutional. This self-congruence of art with its own essence is the culmination of art history. After it there can be nothing new in a distinctively artistic sense… in other words, postmodern art is essentially post-historical. Art, in effect, has come to an end.” (Pg. 182)

Another essayist argues, “The failure of political discourse and ideological dogma has caused the superstition of art as a progress attitude to be overcome. Artists have realized that the principles of progressivist thought can be reduced, in the final analysis, to an internal progression or evolution of language along lines of escape which parallel the utopian escape of ideology. The art of the immediate past sought to take part in social change through the expansion of new processes and new materials, moving away from painting and from the static time of the work. Present art tends to discard illustrations of what lies outside itself, and to turn back on its own footsteps.” (Pg. 258-259)

Still another essayist asks, “What rupture does so-called postmodernism imply in this set-up? Does postmodernist criticism, interpreted as a crisis in the assumptions behind modernity, in any way modify our reading of the role which the province has hitherto played on the map of international dependencies? Modernity has always been intimately linked to the idea and practice of writing. The storage of knowledge in books generated meaning and fixed reference points; the book as history is also history as the book. Postmodernity, on the other hand, declares itself concerned not with the question of establishing meanings, but with the challenging of the very concept of any monological or univalent structure of signification.” (Pg. 467)

One must of course observe that this collection is now more than twenty years old---an eternity, for a movement which strives to be “the latest thing.” However, for anyone seeking a broad overview/orientation of the earlier phases of postmodernism, this book will be very useful.
Defolosk
This is a good anthology for those just learning about postmodernism, but it's kind of silly if you know anything about this world-o-theory; it's just excerpts from larger essays (includes works by Lyotard, Jameson, Habermas, Hassan, Crimp, Crowther, Baudrillard, Eco, Jencks, Laclau, Rorty, etc.); if you need to buy it for school (it's great for using as a teaching tool for basic intro theory sort of courses, or if you're trying to teach pomo lit and need a quick theoretical framework), go ahead, but if you want to learn about Postmodernism, go actually read the Jameson, Baudrillard, Jencks, and Lyotard and poke about online for Eco essays (a lot of this stuff is available online). The nature of this anthology is that you'll only know _about_ these theories; if you actually need/want to know what you're talking about without embarrassing yourself, read the primary sources. Of course, such could be said for most anthologies, but these particular issues are more delicately complex than they are anthologizeable.