carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures

eBook Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures download

by Mary Ruefle

eBook Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures download ISBN: 1933517573
Author: Mary Ruefle
Publisher: Wave Books; First Edition edition (August 7, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1809 kb
Fb2: 1700 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: rtf doc lrf txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Mary Ruefle is the author of Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism (Wave Books, 2012), and Selected Poems (Wave Books, 2010), winner of the William Carlos Williams Award.

Mary Ruefle is the author of Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures, a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism (Wave Books, 2012), and Selected Poems (Wave Books, 2010), winner of the William Carlos Williams Award. She has published ten other books of poetry, a book of prose (The Most of It, Wave Books, 2008), and a comic book, Go Home and Go to Bed!, (Pilot Books/Orange Table Comics, 2007); she is also an erasure artist, whose treatments of nineteenth century texts have been exhibited in museums and galleries, and include the publication of.

Mary Ruefle is the author of many books, including Dunce (Wave Books, 2019), My Private Property (Wave Books, 2016), Trances of the Blast (Wave Books, 2013), Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures (Wave Books, 2012), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle.

Mary Ruefle is the author of many books, including Dunce (Wave Books, 2019), My Private Property (Wave Books, 2016), Trances of the Blast (Wave Books, 2013), Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures (Wave Books, 2012), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism, and Selected Poems (Wave Books, 2010), winner. of the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America.

Madness, Rack, and Honey book. Over the course of fifteen years, Mary Ruefle delivered a lecture every six months to a group of poetry graduate students. Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding instead an utter-and utterly n.

Mary Ruefle (born 1952) is an American poet, essayist, and professor. She has published many collections of poetry, the most recent of which, Dunce (Wave Books, 2019), was longlisted for the National Book Award in Poetry. Ruefle's debut collection of prose, The Most Of It, appeared in 2008 and her collected lectures, Madness, Rack, and Honey, was published in August 2012, both published by Wave Books

Readers will react the same way when they turn the pages of Mary Ruefle’s Madness, Rack, and Honey, in which good sense and nonsense alike appear as steps on the path to enlightenment. But how many readers will that be? This is one of the wisest books I’ve read in years, and it would be a shame to think that only poets will read it. Yes, poetry is the nominal topic. For 15 years Ruefle, a much published poet, gave a lecture every six months to a group of graduate students, and those lectures are collected here.

Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding . Finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award

Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding instead an utter-and utterly n. Finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. Mary Ruefle has published more than a dozen books of poetry, prose, and erasures. She lives in Vermont. Other Titles of Interest. From the publisher: A new collection of exciting and vivacious prose poems

Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding instead an. .

Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding instead an utter-and utterly n.

4:03 MADNESS, RACK AND HONEY by Mary Ruefle. 5:12 WEST WITH THE NIGHT by Beryl Markham. September 7, 3p HAY FORUM DALLAS - DAY 1. Documentary & Activism Photography Steve Pavey Exhibit Kick off with Kael Alford. War on Women With Miriam Toews, Cristina Rivera Garza & Leni Zumas. Backyard Salsa Party With Fusion Latina.

This is one of the wisest books I've read in years... —New York Times Book ReviewNo writer I know of comes close to even trying to articulate the weird magic of poetry as Ruefle does. She acknowledges and celebrates in the odd mystery and mysticism of the act—the fact that poetry must both guard and reveal, hint at and pull back... Also, and maybe most crucially, Ruefle’s work is never once stuffy or overdone: she writes this stuff with a level of seriousness-as-play that’s vital and welcome, that doesn’t make writing poetry sound anything but wild, strange, life-enlargening fun. -The Kenyon ReviewProfound, unpredictable, charming, and outright funny...These informal talks have far more staying power and verve than most of their kind. Readers may come away dazzled, as well as amused... —Publishers WeeklyThis is a book not just for poets but for anyone interested in the human heart, the inner-life, the breath exhaling a completion of an idea that will make you feel changed in some way. This is a desert island book. —Matthew DickmanThe accomplished poet is humorous and self-deprecating in this collection of illuminating essays on poetry, aesthetics and literature... —San Francisco Examiner

Over the course of fifteen years, Mary Ruefle delivered a lecture every six months to a group of poetry graduate students. Collected here for the first time, these lectures include "Poetry and the Moon," "Someone Reading a Book Is a Sign of Order in the World," and "Lectures I Will Never Give." Intellectually virtuosic, instructive, and experiential, Madness, Rack, and Honey resists definition, demanding instead an utter—and utterly pleasurable—immersion. Finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award.

Mary Ruefle has published more than a dozen books of poetry, prose, and erasures. She lives in Vermont.

Comments: (7)
BOND
Mary Ruefle is an intriguing writer. I'm surprised I had not crossed her literary path before learning about this book. She is well-known and much honored as a poet, though "Madness, Rack, and Honey" consists of essays that began as lectures delivered at Vermont College, where she teaches. They are very poetic essays, too, which make me eager to read more of her poetry than the few examples I've found posted online. She has a unique turn of mind (and the perfect poet's name) and seems to live and breathe her work, much as Emily Dickinson (whom she writes of here) once did. What results, whether essay or poem, is full of delight and amazement at everyday life. Her grasp of poetry and its practitioners, present and past, is dazzling as well. She has obviously read widely and deeply, and speaks heartfully of the experience. Her students are lucky indeed to have a teacher who can convey the elusive beauties of poetry in such a clear and subtle fashion. Others can buy a copy of this beautiful book.
Legionstatic
A collection of lecture texts, notes, and frameworks for lectures on poetry, for graduate courses taught by the author. Ruefle says she isn’t a natural lecturer, but she is a very natural presenter of ideas, and I encountered several that made me close the book and think about them for a while before going on — a good recommendation for a book whose design is to make you think about things. This will be a reread, probably multiple times, in chunks and as a whole.
Anaragelv
Beauty, sympathy, poetry, balance. A satisfying and filling collection of memories and observations, each with its own texture. Absorbing Ruefle's writing feels somehow less like reading than like employing other senses... hard to think of anyone to compare her to.
Uscavel
Mary Ruefle is poet, essayist, and professor; the recipient of numerous awards and honors. She has received the Whiting Writers’ Academy Award, an award in literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, as well as Guggenheim Foundation and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. She has published eleven books of poetry, most recently Trances of the Blast (2013).
"Madness, Rack, and Honey" is a collection of Ruefle’s lectures to graduate students dating from 1994.The lectures presented in Madness, Rack, and Honey, while for the purpose of educating poets, are nothing akin to the more common perception of a lecture. Such discourse is generally associated with the clichéd image that one is being spoken at, tendentiously, tediously, in a flat and bland style. Ruefle, however, is not standing at the lectern here, reading at the students from the same textbook they were assigned at semester’s beginning. She is not the jaded and worn speaker who can recite the words backward, forward, sideways, and while playing poker on Friday night. Ruefle’s lectures stand out like gold charms on a bracelet – each collected for a specific memory, place, or event, able to stand on its own, yet as a collection, they combine and connect one to another, to form a bracelet as unique and special as the person wearing it. The book presents 14 charms, each its own story, and together as a collection, a precious and unique whole.
Reading this book made me want to break out in song. It is melodic and lyrical, a sweet violin andante that pushes forward while you long to be held back in its grasp. There is a waywardness to her lectures. They follow no known map; the actually resist being mapped. Ruefle shares discourse on Emily Dickinson, secrets, endings and beginnings, fear, poetry and the moon. And upon introduction of one of these topics, she then wanders far and wide away from and back to the beginning. There is such a beauty in how she performs this magic. She makes extensive use of the voice of others, often relying on the wisdom of others to attempt an explanation, or certify a digression.
What is madness, rack, honey? It is Ruefle’s metaphor for what is poetry, a paradox, a non-linear abstraction, the essence of poetry. As she puts it:
“As practitioners of poetry you are practitioners of madness, rack, and honey. You are mercy-givers who execute. You are executioners who show mercy.” (p. 141). This definition is exquisite. Read it again. Mercy-givers and executioners, such a bold thought. A contradiction. A magical cloak for the poet to wear; turn right and it is one thing, turn left, the opposite. A paradox which Ruefle attempts to resolve in her collected lectures. One which she speaks contrary to her assertions frequently and with full knowing. She admits she is serving up truth which she then belies. Part of the fascination for the poet in poetry is that it bends back upon itself, snaking away from certainty which presenting a truth for the moment. “It is also the nature of poetry to determine or affirm one’s relation to the incomprehensible condition of existence (p.132).” There are options here, not certainties.
Madness, Rack, and Honey: Collected Lectures
Talrajas
Brilliant!
Marinara
This volume still amazes me though I am not much of a poetry buff. I find myself giving it over and over again to people I know read a lot, hate gift cards. The review (Bookworm) led me to Mary Ruefle. My thanks.
Grarana
Mary Ruefle's lectures are so interesting as I would expect from a creative writing professor. So glad I purchased this book.
Madness, Rack and Honey is one of the most important books of contemporary poetic theory I've come across in many years, totally non-academic and written from the point-of-view of a practitioner and innovator of the craft, emphasizing the real over the ideal, the rock-hard detail over the abstract concept. To see Ruefle's mind at work, finding correspondences between seemingly incompatible topics, is a wonder, and her voice rings with clarity and tinkles with offbeat humor. Compare these lithe lectures to Louise Gluck's stodgy prose theorizing, also useful in its way, but not half as much fun and ultimately cold-hearted and academic.

The edition by Wave Books is comfortable to read, on sturdy paper and with nice wide margins for making notes.