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by Hershel Parker

eBook Melville: The Making of the Poet download ISBN: 0810124645
Author: Hershel Parker
Publisher: Northwestern University Press; 1 edition (December 11, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1783 kb
Fb2: 1892 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Hershel Parker, H. Fletcher Brown Professor Emeritus at the University of Delaware, is the .

What Parker does do in MELVILLE: THE MAKING OF THE POET is cite, document, and discuss thoroughly the evidence related to Melville's reading and study of poetry from his earliest years that renders obsolete and unsustainable the unfounded, inaccurate view that poetry for Melville was a sideline, an afterthought, a way to escape the disappointing contemporary reception and poor sales of prose.

As Hershel Parker demonstrates in this book, Melville was steeped in poetry long before he called himself a poet. His work corrects two of the most pernicious misconceptions about Melville perpetuated by earlier critics: that he repudiated fiction writing after Pierre, and that he hadn’t begun writing poetry (let alone had a book of poems ready for publication) as early as 1860. In clearing up these misapprehensions, Parker gives a thorough.

Who would have looked for philosophy in whales, or for poetry in blubber?" the London John Bull remarked in October of 1851.

Parker is the H. Fletcher Brown Professor Emeritus at the University of Delaware.

Herman Melville : a biography. writing desk: 1886-1891 - In and out of the house of the tragic poet: 1886-1891. Traces Melville's life from his childhood in New York, through his adventures abroad as a sailor, to his creation of "Moby-Dick," and forty years later, to his death, in obscurity. Association of American Publishers PROSE Award (volume 2), 2002.

Publication, Distribution, et. Evanston, Ill. Melville's lost books and the trajectory of his career as poet A poet in prose: how critics prepared Melville to think of himself as a poet Melville as hearer and reciter of poetry The omnipresence of poetry, 1820s-1848 The renewed power of poetry in Melville's life, 1849-1856 The status of poetry and the temptation of flunkeyism A nonpartisan.

Hershel Parker (Parker, Hershel). used books, rare books and new books. Melville: The Making of the Poet: ISBN 9780810124646 (978-0-8101-2464-6) Hardcover, Northwestern University Press, 2007. Find all books by 'Hershel Parker' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Hershel Parker'. Billy Budd, Sailor and Other Uncompleted Writings: The Writings of Herman Melville, Volume 13. ISBN 9780810111141 (978-0-8101-1114-1) Softcover, Northwestern University Press, 2017. Moby-Dick As Doubloon; Essays and Extracts, 1851-1970. by Hershel Parker, Harrison Hayford.

Herman Melville ranks with Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson as one of the three great American poets of the nineteenth century.

Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder, by Caroline Fraser (Metropolitan Books).

Melville Biography: An Inside Narrative is Hershel Parker's history of the writing of Melville biographies, enriched by his intimate working relationships with great Melvilleans, dead and living. Next, Parker traces six decades the persistent war New Critics have waged against biographical scholarship on Melville

“Who would have looked for philosophy in whales, or for poetry in blubber?” the London John Bull remarked in October of 1851. And yet, the reviewer went on, “few books which professedly deal in metaphysics, or claim the parentage of the muses, contain as much true philosophy and as much genuine poetry as the tale of the Pequod's whaling expedition.” A decade and a half before surprising the world with a book of Civil war poetry, Melville was already confident of what was “poetic” in his prose. As Hershel Parker demonstrates in this book, Melville was steeped in poetry long before he called himself a poet. Here Parker, the dean of Melville studies, gives a compelling, in-depth account of how one of America’s greatest writers grew into the vocation of a poet. His work corrects two of the most pernicious misconceptions about Melville perpetuated by earlier critics: that he repudiated fiction writing after Pierre, and that he hadn’t begun writing poetry (let alone had a book of poems ready for publication) as early as 1860. In clearing up these misapprehensions, Parker gives a thorough and thoroughly involving account of Melville’s development as a poet. Parker demonstrates for the first time just how crucial poetry was to Melville from childhood to old age, especially its re-emergence in his life after 1849. Drawing on Melville's shrewd annotations of great British poets and on his probing, skeptical engagement with commentaries on poetry (particularly by the great Scots reviewers), Parker paints a richly textured portrait of a hitherto unseen side of Herman Melville.

Comments: (4)
watching to future
Melville, as a born genius to poetic prose, adopted the painstaking journey of an autodidact to become an accomplished poet; Parker brilliantly examines and documents this process. an absolute MUST for Melville lovers and Literature lovers too.
Virtual
Poets don't just happen, especially American poets. Like many of his contemporaries, Melville agonized over what it meant to become a poet--and Parker reveals step-by-step how Melville chose not to become the poet of "Young America," but instead came to see himself, and to fashion himself, as a contemporary of Tennyson and Arnold.

In the mode of his two-volume biography of Melville, Parker analyzes the known (Melville's books of poetry and criticism and the running commentary he kept up with their authors in the margins) and speculates responsibly about the uncertain (conversations with living writers and critics like H. T. Tuckerman).

Specifically disclaiming a critical assessment of Melville's poetry, Parker comprehensively lays out the groundwork for such an assessment and opens the door for informed critical analysis. Along with Stovall's THE FOREGROUND OF LEAVES OF GRASS this book demonstrates the intensity of both external study and re-imagination of self in the process of becoming a poet in Nineteenth-Century America.
Heraly
Those wanting to know Herman Melville the poet and how much poetry meant to him all of his life would do well to start with Hershel Parker's MELVILLE: THE MAKING OF THE POET. This book will surely prove foundational in the coming years and decades as Melville enthusiasts and scholars come to enjoy easy access to Melville's poetry -- many for the first time -- as it becomes readily available in the forthcoming final two volumes of the Northwestern-Newberry series, THE WRITINGS OF HERMAN MELVILLE.

Parker intentionally does not excerpt or quote much of Melville's poetry, nor does he offer extended discussions concerning Melville's status as a poet. However he does suggest that Melville's poetry might be favorably ranked with the poetry of Dickinson, Whitman, the Brownings, and Tennyson. Parker is not alone in suggesting and arguing for the worth of Melville's poetry. Many poets, readers, and critics have praised Melville's poetic writings -- Robert Penn Warren, Muriel Rukeyser (The Life of Poetry), and, more recently, Helen Vendler (Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology), to name just a few.

What Parker does do in MELVILLE: THE MAKING OF THE POET is cite, document, and discuss thoroughly the evidence related to Melville's reading and study of poetry from his earliest years that renders obsolete and unsustainable the unfounded, inaccurate view that poetry for Melville was a sideline, an afterthought, a way to escape the disappointing contemporary reception and poor sales of prose masterworks like MOBY-DICK. In following Melville's reading and book buying, Parker shows us glimpses of him finding, reading, and purchasing works (e.g., purchasing on October 27, 1861 Henry Taylor's NOTES FROM LIFE IN SEVEN ESSAYS) that encouraged him to assume the identity of a poet and pursue the sort of life best suited to the writing of poetry.

Finally, perhaps not the least of the facts you will learn when reading MELVILLE: THE MAKING OF THE POET, are those related to Parker's re-telling and re-documenting (the evidence has been lying in plain site for decades) Melville's failed, but very real, attempt to publish in 1860 what would have been his first published volume of poetry, titled simply, by Melville himself, POEMS.

If you want to understand and appreciate Melville the poet and the poetry he wrote, this is an essential, foundational book to add to your reading library.
adventure time
Mr. Parker is a major scholar in Melville Studies. This "review" is the humble opinion of a nonscholar Melville lover.

If you have an overpowering need to see numerous small documented facts about Herman Melville's penchant for poetry, your passion will be fulfilled by Mr. Parker. He offers a page by page surfeit of names, titles, and references about what HM studied and knew about poetry. The thorough documentation is fine but the book also echoes with many a "might have," "may have," "could have" and other indicia of speculation about HM's interest in or discussion (even perhaps in the privacy of his home) of poetry. Within this effort to prove that HM was a true poet (I believe he was but was he a great one?) and that Kazin and others who say otherwise were wrong, there are many interesting insights and bits of Melvilleiana.

Mr. Parker's gives us over 200 pages of text on HM as a poet with but a few lines of HM's verse and equally sparse commentary on the verse. This is strictly a book about HM the poet not HM's poetry. If you want to know through fact and speculation how HM became a poet, this volume a fine place to start. Personally, a concise journal article would have done the job for me. I would still like to know more about HM's poetry.