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eBook Shakespeare's Daughters download

by Sharon Hamilton

eBook Shakespeare's Daughters download ISBN: 0786415673
Author: Sharon Hamilton
Publisher: McFarland (March 25, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 191
ePub: 1932 kb
Fb2: 1926 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx rtf azw lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Sharon Hamilton teaches electives in Shakespeare, English literature and cross-cultural literature at Buckingham . I enjoyed this book thoroughly, was unable to put it down.

Sharon Hamilton teaches electives in Shakespeare, English literature and cross-cultural literature at Buckingham Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She lives in a suburb of Boston. Reading "Shakespeare's Daughters" was a wonderful way to jog my memory as to plots and characters.

Shakespeare's Daughters Sharon Hamilton McFarland Shakespeare (Art Today); detail from Under the Lemon .

Shakespeare's Daughters Sharon Hamilton McFarland Shakespeare (Art Today); detail from Under the Lemon Trees, Bordighera by Claude Monet, 1884 (PicturesNow. com) McFarland the young. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Cover art: Ophelia by John William Waterhouse, 1894 (Eyewire); Shakespeare (Art Today); detail from Under the Lemon Trees, Bordighera by Claude Monet, 1884 (PicturesNow.

Shakespeare's Daughters book. Hamilton compares father-daughter relationships in Shakespeare's plays, Capulet and Juliet, Prospero and Miranda, Ophelia and Polonius, Lear and his three daughters and even Portia's ties with her deceased father. I especially like how many of the plays are contrasted (Hamilton compares the fates of Juliet and Miranda, for example). It's easy to follow, easy to read and well-structured.

The father-daughter relationship was one that Shakespeare explored again and again

The father-daughter relationship was one that Shakespeare explored again and again. The father-daughter relationship was one that Shakespeare explored again and again. His typical pattern featured a middle-aged or older man, usually a widower, with an adolescent daughter who had spent most of her life under her father's control, protected in his house.

Shakespeare’s Daughters. by Sharon Hamilton Publish: Mar 25, 2003. His typical pattern featured a middle-aged or older man, usually a widower, with an adolescent daughter who had spent most of her life under her father’s control, protected in his house. The plays usually begin when the daughter is on the verge of womanhood and eager to assert her own identity and make her own decisions, especially in matters of the heart, even if it means going against her father’s wishes.

Shakespeare's daughters. Sharon Hamilton teaches electives in Shakespeare, English literature and cross-cultural literature at Buckingham Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In her debut, Hamilton (chair, English Dept. Buckingham Browne & Nichols Sc. Cambridge, MA) examines the varied range of father-daughter relationships in Shakespeare's dramas, arguing that the. Tam incelemeyi okuyun.

The father-daughter relationship was one that Shakespeare explored again and again. The plays usually begin when the daughter is on the verge of womanhood and eager to assert her own identity and make her own decisions, especially in matters of the heart, even if it means going against her father's wishes.

Kate Morgan is engaged to the most eligible bachelor in Sonoma County, the son of a wealthy wine family in Healdsburg, California

Kate Morgan is engaged to the most eligible bachelor in Sonoma County, the son of a wealthy wine family in Healdsburg, California. On a flight to visit her sister in Portland she is seated next to a young hard-bodied elite soldier who ignites her insides in a strange attraction she cannot deny.

The father-daughter relationship was one that Shakespeare explored again and again. His typical pattern featured a middle-aged or older man, usually a widower, with an adolescent daughter who had spent most of her life under her father's control, protected in his house. The plays usually begin when the daughter is on the verge of womanhood and eager to assert her own identity and make her own decisions, especially in matters of the heart, even if it means going against her father's wishes.

This work considers Capulet in Romeo and Juliet as an inept father to Juliet and Prospero in The Tempest as an able mentor to Miranda; Hermia in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Jessica in The Merchant of Venice and Desdemona in Othello as daughters who rebel against their fathers; Hero in Much Ado About Nothing, Lavinia in Titus Andronicus and Ophelia in Hamlet as daughters who acquiesce; Bianca in The Taming of the Shrew and Goneril and Regan in King Lear as daughters who cunningly play the good girl role; Portia in The Merchant of Venice, Viola in Twelfth Night and Rosalind in As You Like It as daughters who act in their fathers' places; and Marina in Pericles, Perdita in The Winter's Tale and Cordelia in Lear as daughters who forgive and heal.

Comments: (2)
Dozilkree
I enjoyed this book thoroughly, was unable to put it down. I haven't read enough Shakespeare, haven't seen many of the plays performed, but "Shakespeare's Daughter's" makes me understand two things: what I've been missing, and how thoroughly his themes and language have permeated our everyday lives.

Reading "Shakespeare's Daughters" was a wonderful way to jog my memory as to plots and characters. The author includes just enough of his poetry to lift the heart and make any would-be writer sigh with envy.

But by far the most interesting thing for me was Hamilton's skill in examining a range of plays through the common lens of the father-daughter relationship. Fascinating and timely. She uses Shakespeare's wisdom to illuminate the psychology of contemporary child-rearing. Great stuff.
Liarienen
Sharon Hamilton evidently knows her way around the works of William Shakespeare and, as she demonstrates in this analysis of Shakespearean depictions of father/daughter relations, around human nature in the raw. Any reading or re-reading of the plays will be immeasurably enhanced by the insights she winkles out. This is a book that thespians especially will benefit by.
Happily Ms. Hamilton's attempt to equate the English language's greatest wordsmith with a certain Will Shakspere of Stratford - a dreary and litigious businessman and one-time actor scarcely able to write his own name and sire incidentally of two apparently illiterate daughters - detracts but little from this invigorating volume.