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eBook Thurber on Crime download

by James Thurber

eBook Thurber on Crime download ISBN: 0892964502
Author: James Thurber
Publisher: Mysterious Press (November 1, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1718 kb
Fb2: 1868 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit docx lrf rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894 – November 2, 1961) was an American cartoonist, author, humorist, journalist, playwright, children's book author, and celebrated wit.

James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894 – November 2, 1961) was an American cartoonist, author, humorist, journalist, playwright, children's book author, and celebrated wit. He was best known for his cartoons and short stories published mainly in The New Yorker magazine, such as "The Catbird Seat", and collected in his numerous books. He was one of the most popular humorists of his time, as he celebrated the comic frustrations and eccentricities of ordinary people.

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How can anyone describe this book? It isn't a parable, a fairy story, or a poem, but rather a mixture of all three. It is beautiful and it is comic. It is philosophical and it is cheery. What we suppose we are trying fumblingly to say is, in a word, that it is Thurber. Littlejack has a map that indicates the existence of a treasure on a far and lonely island, and Black has a ship to get there. So the two bad men team up and sail off on Black's vessel, the Aeiu.

Thurber on Crime book. James Thurber is a classic golden age New Yorker writer- he did articles, stories AND cartoons! Versatile. Thurber on Crime is just what it says- a collection of (very) short fiction, factual articles about police dogs (four different articles) and his cartoons. At 200 pages, it's a fast, fast read. I skimmed several of the stories near the end- the "childrens book as film noir" story was particularly painful and dated.

Born in Columbus, Ohio, Thurber was blinded in one eye in a childhood accident. He attended Ohio State University but left without earning a degree.

One of the greatest American humorists of our century, Thurber was not a man to shrink from danger-as long as he was safely ensconced behind his typewriter or drawing board. Here is a collection of ruminations on everyday villainy-stories, articles and drawings on the evil that men and women do. 32 line drawings. Born in Columbus, Ohio, Thurber was blinded in one eye in a childhood accident. In 1925 he moved to New York City, where he joined the staff of the New Yorker in 1927 at the urging of his friend E. B. White.

Author:James Thurber. Thurber On Crime, 1991 (ed. Robert Lopresti). People Have More Fun Than Anybody: A Centennial Celebration of Drawings and Writings by James Thurber, 1994 (ed. Michael J. Rosen). James Thurber: Writings and Drawings, 1996, (ed. Garrison Keillor), Library of America, ISBN 978-1-88301122-2. The Dog Department: James Thurber on Hounds, Scotties, and Talking Poodles, 2001 (ed. The Thurber Letters, 2002 (ed.

Back James Thurber Print. From poetry, novels, and memoirs to journalism, crime writing, and science fiction, the more than 300 volumes published by Library of America are widely recognized as America’s literary canon

Back James Thurber Print. James Thurber in front of some of his drawings, 1945. Bob Landry/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images). From poetry, novels, and memoirs to journalism, crime writing, and science fiction, the more than 300 volumes published by Library of America are widely recognized as America’s literary canon. With contributions from donors, Library of America preserves and celebrates a vital part of our cultural heritage for generations to come.

1596 RUR. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty: A New Musical Based on the Classic Story.

2726 RUR. The Last Flower: A Parable in Pictures. 1596 RUR. James Thurber, Joe Manchester.

One of the greatest American humorists of our century, Thurber was not a man to shrink from danger--as long as he was safely ensconced behind his typewriter or drawing board. Here is a collection of ruminations on everyday villainy--stories, articles and drawings on the evil that men and women do. 32 line drawings.
Comments: (3)
Dakora
Great book with great stories!
Bladecliff
James Thurber, best remembered today as the creator of Walter Mitty, is one of the group of staff writers who earned The New Yorker its reputation as the "greatest magazine in the world, perhaps the best that ever was," as the old commercial used to inform us. There were several different types of writers in that group, the infamously long essays were turned out by folks like Joseph Mitchell and Berton Roueche (my two favorites), while shorter pieces, drawings, poems, etc., were the province of Thurber, Robert Benchley, E. B. White and several other polymaths. Considering the range of his duties, that he was writing for a weekly magazine, and the length of his career (the pieces in this collection span a period from 1929 to 1961), you could probably fill numerous volumes with Thurber's work and indeed there are plenty of collections of his varied output available, many published during his life but many others posthumous.
Though he would not be considered a crime writer, this book happens to be organized around the topic of crime, and that serves to give it a thematic coherence that a random anthology would lack. Included are drawings, stories, and articles that cover a whole range of topics, fiction and nonfiction. Plenty of folks only look at the cartoons in The New Yorker, and if you enjoy that style of humor, you'll enjoy Thurber's drawings. His artwork borders on the amateurish--and since he eventually went blind, it got worse as he went along--but it's certainly distinctive.
Most all of the stories are written with the wry wit for which Thurber was best known--in his Introduction, Donald E. Westlake calls it "gentle comedy." There's an especially good true tale about an employee who stole tens of thousands of dollars from Harold Ross, the magazine's publisher, before being caught. Though ostensibly an attempt to understand the thief, who ended up committing suicide, Thurber turns it into an opportunity to poke fun at Ross.
But far and away the best thing in the book, and one of the best stories I've ever read, is "The Macbeth Murder Mystery." An American woman visiting an English hotel accidentally grabs The Tragedy of Macbeth instead of one of the cheap mysteries she intended. Undaunted, she simply reads the play as a whodunit, and to the narrator's astonishment, decides that the Macbeths are not guilty. Her explanations, full of perfectly rational references to the traditions and conventions of the detective genre, eventually ensnare the narrator and the reader, and when, by the end of the story, he's offered his own solution to the mystery and is ready to take on Hamlet, we too are carried away by the demented logic of the tale.
The book's worth reading for that story alone; the rest is gravy.
GRADE : B+
Cordantrius
Off-beat and idiosyncratic, the gentle stories, snippets, and cartoons in Thurber on Crime will make you chuckle, laugh, wince, and groan. A few may even baffle you, especially those that seem no more than sketches whose purpose Thurber never discovered. As crime writer Donald E. Westlake says in the Foreword; "Thurber on crime. There's nothing in the world quite like it."