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eBook This Simian World download

by Clarence Jr. Day,1stworld Library

eBook This Simian World download ISBN: 1421809168
Author: Clarence Jr. Day,1stworld Library
Publisher: 1st World Library - Literary Society (February 20, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 108
ePub: 1368 kb
Fb2: 1796 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mbr doc rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Librivox recording of This Simian World by Clarence Day, J. thissimianworld 1 day.

Librivox recording of This Simian World by Clarence Day, Jr. Read by Epistomolus  . Clarence Day, J. best known for his work Life with Father, presents a satirical speculation on how the world might be different if we apes had not risen to prominence, but rather one of the other species had become dominant in our place. summary by Epistomolus). For more free audiobooks, or to become a volunteer reader, please visit librivox. M4B audio book (49mb).

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Clarence Shepard Day, Jr. (1874–1935) was an American author and cartoonist, best known for his work Life With Father. The following year, he joined the New York Stock Exchange, and became a partner in his father's Wall Street brokerage firm. Day enlisted in the Navy in 1898, but developed crippling arthritis and spent the remainder of his life as a semi-invalid. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable . Похожие книги: This Simian World. Clarence Day Jr. Our monkey-blood is also apparent in our judgments of . т 470. This Simian World (Classic Reprint).

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at ww. stWorldLibrary. ORG - - Last Sunday, Potter took me out driving along upper Broadway, where those long rows of tall new apartment houses were built a few years ago. It was a mild afternoon and great crowds of people were out. Sunday afternoon crowds.

This Simian World book.

Clarence Shepard Day, J. (November 18, 1874–December 28, 1935) was an American author. Born in New York City, he graduated from St. Paul's School and Yale University in 1896. Scenes from the book, along with its 1932 prequel, God and my Father, and its posthumous 1937 sequel, Life with Mother, were the basis for a 1939 play by Howard Lindsay and Russell Crouse, which became one of Broadway's longest-running, non-musical hits. In 1947-the year the play ended on Broadway-William Powell and Irene Dunne portrayed Day's parents in the film of the same name.

Published May 22, 1920.

This Simian World - Clarence Day. The Project Gutenberg EBook of This Simian World, by Clarence Day. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with. almost no restrictions whatsoever. Published May 22, 1920. Reprinted Nine Times.

Our monkey-blood is also apparent in our judgments of crime

Our monkey-blood is also apparent in our judgments of crime. Elephants would have probably taken an opposite stand. They aren't creatures of impulse, and would be shocked at crimes due to such causes; their fault is the opposite one of pondering too long over injuries, and becoming vindictive in the end, out of all due proportion

Clarence Day, J.

Clarence Day, J. Genre(s): Humorous Fiction, Satire.

Title: This Simian World. Author: Clarence Day, Jr. Posting Date: December 31, 2012 Release Date: November, 2004 First Posted: February 6, 2003. The Project Gutenberg EBook of This Simian World, by Clarence Day, Jr. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at ww. utenberg. Title: This Simian World.

Last Sunday, Potter took me out driving along upper Broadway, where those long rows of tall new apartment houses were built a few years ago. It was a mild afternoon and great crowds of people were out. Sunday afternoon crowds. They were not going anywhere, - they were just strolling up and down, staring at each other, and talking. There were thousands and thousands of them. "Awful, aren't they!" said Potter. I didn't know what he meant. When he added, "Why, these crowds," I turned and asked, "Why, what about them?" I wasn't sure whether he had an idea or a headache. "Other creatures don't do it," he replied, with a discouraged expression. "Are any other beings ever found in such masses, but vermin? Aimless, staring, vacant-minded, - look at them! I can get no sense whatever of individual worth, or of value in men as a race, when I see them like this. It makes one almost despair of civilization."
Comments: (7)
Acebiolane
I first read this book as a teenager in the 1930s. I have never forgotten the paragraph that appears on page 91 of the book. It reads "It is possible that our race may be an accident in a meaningless universe living it's brief life uncared for on this dark, cooling star." That and the rest of this paragraph I regard as one of the most profound assessments of the human condition. In spite of the passage of 70 or more years I have never forgotten it and never will.
Usic
It is a delightfully thoughtful book of ways humanity is like it is because of its simian, monkeyish, ancestry.

I didn't describe the characters because there aren't characters.
Iseared
Bought this to replace one I had loaned. It's been out of print for many years. Out of the box thinking from the 1920's.
Mall
Not a master peace.
Stanober
I thought I wrote a review of this book years ago. This Simian World (1920, 1936) by Clarence Day now has some new reprints or collections in which it can be purchased. There was a song and movie called Born Free that is a perfect match for the beginning of chapter 6, so I will quote a few lines.

Let us take the great cats.
They are free from this talent for slave-hood.
Stately beasts like the lion have more independence of mind
than the ants,--and a self-respect,
we may note, unknown to primates.
Opilar
I'm surprised, albeit pleasantly, to see this book back in print. Day's musings on "human nature" focus on how our simian ancestry may have shaped our behavior patterns and outlook on life. This may have been a radical concept when first written in the 1920's, but it will be somewhat old hat for a modern student of evolutionary theory. Still, it is entertainingly written, especially in its imaginings of what, say, a civilization of intelligent cats or ants or birds might be like.
Ishnsius
The first half of the book speculates on humanity's future if it had descended from cats, elephants, or cows. The second, and better, half is some of the saddest and best writing on the human condition produced in the 20th century. I never tire of reading this book and often give copies to friends. It is a joy to see it back in print.

It is better written and funnier than all of the top selling 'humor' books on the bestseller lists.