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by Robert W. Greene

eBook Just Words: Moralism and Metalanguage in Twentieth-Century French Fiction download ISBN: 0271008997
Author: Robert W. Greene
Publisher: Penn State University Press; First Edition edition (July 13, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 204
ePub: 1694 kb
Fb2: 1146 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf mobi rtf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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Rubrics: French fiction 20th century History and criticism Moral conditions in literature Narration (Rhetoric) Ethics in literature. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

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Are the words that a novelist uses adequate to his or her elusive subject-the. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

9109353 20. Personal Name: Greene, Robert . 1933-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Publication, Distribution, et. University Park, Pa. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Robert W. Greene discovers that the two apparently divergent intentions in question (metalinguistic vs. moralistic) often . moralistic) often paradoxically coexist in French fiction. Also, no doubt because it is more consistently self-conscious than that of any previous era, the fiction of twentieth-century France seems to illustrate this convergence with special brillance. Robert W. Greene is Professor of French Studies at the State University of New York, Albany, and author of The Poetic Theory of Pierre Reverdy (1967) and Six French Poets of Our Time (1979). Communication Studies.

Greene, Robert W. 1993. Robert Lowell's Shifting Colors: The Poetics Of The Public & The Personal.

Bohn takes up many of the most challenging, well-known, and lingering critical questions for students of Surrealism, and the reader comes away from the book having learned many important new things, along with the answers to several other, older problems. In an analysis that spans the first two-thirds of the twentieth century, Bohn surveys writers and artists from France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Argentina, Mexico, Chile, and the United States, examining both their aversion to mimesis and the solutions they devised to replace it.

Harrison has modernized the spelling an. More).

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. Harrison has modernized the spelling an. A looking-glasse for London and England ; George a Greene, the pinner of Wakefield ; Selimus, Emperour of the Turkes, and, A maidens dreame, 1591-1599.

Are the words that a novelist uses adequate to his or her elusive subject- the human condition? .

Are the words that a novelist uses adequate to his or her elusive subject- the human condition? Are they pertinent, accurate, invariably fair, unflinchingly.

By: Robert W. Greene.

Are the words that a novelist uses adequate to his or her elusive subject—the human condition? Are they pertinent, accurate, invariably fair, unflinchingly honest? Or do the novelist's words execute essentially formal maneuvers, engaging our interest through their patterns rather than their reach? And what about a possible third, synthesizing option? Robert W. Greene discovers that the two apparently divergent intentions in question (metalinguistic vs. moralistic) often paradoxically coexist in French fiction. Also, no doubt because it is more consistently self-conscious than that of any previous era, the fiction of twentieth-century France seems to illustrate this convergence with special brillance.

From L'lmmoralist (1902) to L'Usage de la parole (1980) Greene explores combinations and permutations of moralistic analysis and metalinguistic commentary in a particular sequence of prose narrative. Along the way, he observes Gide, Proust, Malraux, Camus, Duras, and Sarraute, each in his or her own fashion, moving ceaselessly back and forth between soundings of the heart and diagnoses of the tongue.