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by Nikolai Gogol,George Gibian,George Reavey

eBook Dead Souls (Norton Library (Paperback)) download ISBN: 039300600X
Author: Nikolai Gogol,George Gibian,George Reavey
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; First Edition edition (November 17, 1971)
Language: English
Pages: 480
ePub: 1640 kb
Fb2: 1427 kb
Rating: 4.2
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Nikolai Gogol's "Dead Souls" is an exploration of the methodology of malfeasance in tsarist Russia, where the spirits of serfs take on a statistical yet eerie reality for tax purposes, landowners being taxed on their payroll of serfs, including those who had died between tax-assessments.

Nikolai Gogol's "Dead Souls" is an exploration of the methodology of malfeasance in tsarist Russia, where the spirits of serfs take on a statistical yet eerie reality for tax purposes, landowners being taxed on their payroll of serfs, including those who had died between tax-assessments. Gogol's implicit allusions use a type of demonic doggerel to amuse yet alarm the reader as he looks for the haunting evanescences that are supposedly in the pages of the novel.

New York: Norton, 1986. Gibian, George, and Stephen Jay Parker, eds. The Achievement of Vladimir Nabokov: Essays, Studies, Reminiscences and Stories. Ithaca: Cornell University Center for International Studies, 1984. Criticism The Achievement of Vladimir Nabokov: Gibian, George, and Stephen Jan Parker, eds. Nabokov: Beyond Parody. In The Achievement of Vladimir Nabokov: Essays, Studies, Reminiscences and Stories.

Authors: Gogol, Nikolai, Gibian, George, Gibian, George, Reavey, G. DEAD SOULS NCE 8211 REAVEY TRANSLATI. Publisher: WW Norton & Co. QUICK DESPATCH. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol, George Gibian (Paperback, 1986). Brand new: lowest price.

George Gibian was Goldwin Smith Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. 4. Dead Souls (Norton Library). Nikolai Gogol, George Gibian (Illustrator), George Reavey (Translator). Published by W. W. Norton & Company (1971). His honors include Fulbright, Guggenheim, American Philosophical Society, and Rockefeller Foundation fellowships. He was the author of The Man in the Black Coat: Russia’s Lost Literature of the Absurd, The Interval of Freedom: Russian Literature During the Thaw, and Tolstoj and Shakespeare. ISBN 10: 039300600X ISBN 13: 9780393006001.

George Gibian has done us all a service in collecting a wealth of interesting material toward.

George Reavey, ed. George Gibian. George Gibian has done us all a service in collecting a wealth of interesting material toward. the teaching of Dead Souls. If W. Norton had not insisted on using the Reavey translation. ter from Donald Fanger's book on Gogol'; a section of Belyj's Masterstvo Gogolja; the section. from Nabokov's Nikolai Gogol on poslost'. All are excellent-with the exception of Wilson's. contribution, in which sexual psychology obscures the Romantic origins of the identification.

Hardback and paperback. "Dead Souls – Nikolai Gogol". Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Followed by. Dead Souls, Volume 2 (destroyed by the author before his death.

Nikolai Gogol, George Gibian, G. Reavey. Backgrounds" contains not only Gogol's correspondence relevant to the novel but also the four formal letters that set forth his views on the work.

Description for Dead Souls Paperback. Few literary works have been so variously interpreted as Nikolai Gogol's enduring comic masterpiece, Dead Souls. Num Pages: 608 pages, bibliography. BIC Classification: 1DVU; 2AGR; DSBF; DSK; FC. He was the author of The Man in the Black Coat: Russia's Lost Literature of the Absurd, The Interval of Freedom: Russian Literature During the Thaw, and Tolstoj and Shakespeare.

Nikolai Gogol, George Reavey (Translator). George Gibian (Illustrator)

The New Russian Poets, 1953 to 1966. Nikolai Gogol, George Reavey (Translator). George Gibian (Illustrator).

Part I of Dead Souls was published in 1842. Part II of Dead Souls exists only in fragments. The novel belongs to the great unfinished works of world literature (such as The Aeneid) whose incompletion bothers us very little.

A few factual points ought to be explained to the reader, even though the novel itself eventually suffices to clarify some of them. First, the title of the book. Among Russian serf-owning gentry, the idiomatic way to assess someone’s wealth was to express it in terms of the number of “souls” he owned―that is, male, adult serfs. Taxes on serfs had to be paid by the owner until the next census or registration date even if they may have died in the meantime. Gogol’s “dead souls,” in addition to this literal reference to serfs who had died since the last registration date for serfs, are also a metaphor for the dead moral and spiritual sensibilities of the many inhabitants of Gogol’s zoo. This title ran into trouble with Gogol’s censors, who held the ridiculous suspicion that the title might be a blasphemous attack on the immortality of the human soul. Gogol therefore added the title “Chichikov’s Adventures.”
Comments: (6)
Thorgaginn
I just love reading Egholm. Yesterday I finished the second novel with Peter Boutrup in the leading role - and it was one of the best crime novels I've ever read!
Egholms's writing keeps you reading on until the end, wanting to know how everything ties together. And then you must consider that I read in translation, so probably the Danish version is even better.

In this volume, Peter has coped with the loss of Felix (lead character in the first novel of the series). His boss Manfred and himself are now working in a convent named St. Mary's. One evening, Peter sees how a man approaches a young nun.
Not much later, he is approached by Sister Beatrice, to look into the disapperance of Sister Melissa. While Peter conducts his investigation, albeit unwillingly, the body of Melissa is found in the moat of the convent. She has been garotted...

In the meantime, diver Kir has found a box filled with human bones somewhere in a deep in the Kattegat. The bones are brought to the forensic unit to be inspected - and they turn out to be more than 60 years old. Both Mark Bille Hansen and Peter have a feeling these two finds are connected however, and so they prove to be.

More people get murdered, others disappear. It is Peter who finally can tie the loose ends and finds out the identity of the killer. But before he does, lots of things happen.

This book is full of aciton and also shows a lot of psychological insight. It also deals with things we all can come into contact with.

A must-read!
WinDImmortaL
Excellent. More from this author please!!?
Wel
Loved it, interesting addendum to Dicte TV series
uspeh
This is actually the second book in the “Peter Boutrup” series and I have not read the first – but this was easily read as a standalone and I thought it was superb.

When a young Nun is found murdered, her story links to a violent and unknown history. Peter Boutrop, who has problems of his own, gets caught up in the tangled web and is reluctantly drawn into a world he wants no part of.

There is a high quality character arc to this tale and the backdrop is brilliantly described to give you a sense of the surroundings. Quite apart from Peter there is a small group of well drawn, intriguing and often enigmatic characters to follow along with, whose lives you will find yourself hopelessly caught up in. I adored Peter as a character, so tough on the outside but just as conflicted inside as anybody else – his reluctance to get involved followed by an inate need to find the truth is endlessly compelling.

There are some great examples of Danish crime fiction around at the moment and this is top notch – beautifully written, with a very engaging and engrossing mystery, peppered with some marvellous and easily loveable characters, I shall definitely be reading the first book and I hope that the next one is not far away.

Highly Recommended for crime fiction fans.

Happy Reading Folks!
Moonshaper
Nikolai Gogol's "Dead Souls" is an exploration of the methodology of malfeasance in tsarist Russia, where the spirits of serfs take on a statistical yet eerie reality for tax purposes, landowners being taxed on their payroll of serfs, including those who had died between tax-assessments. Gogol's implicit allusions use a type of demonic doggerel to amuse yet alarm the reader as he looks for the haunting evanescences that are supposedly in the pages of the novel.

Gogol's story is like some of the Dickensian ghost stories as the narrator fancies inanimate things transformed and wriggling with life. The main character, Chichikov, is described with coy neutrality as "not overly fat, not overly thin", who first greets the reader with fleeting, unwanted apparitions in the form of vermin, "with cockroaches peeping out like prunes from every corner" in a wayside in. His servant Petruska, carries his greatcoat "a special odour all his own that had also been imparted to the next thing he brought in, a sack containing the sundries of a manservant's toilet", the special odour perhaps recalling the odour of sanctity or death conjured by Dostoevsky in "The Brothers Karamazov".

Chichikov buys the dead souls of serfs from landowners which entitles him to by land to "resettle" and so enter the boyar class. On a figurative level, Chichikov is also a dead soul, affable, inoffensive, unremarkable, at least superficially a nondescript part of the landowning establishment. He is a confidence-trickster whose plots, who ultimately outsmarts only himself. Gogol addressed himself with a parodic allusion, noting, "the dreadful appalling mass of trifles that mires our lives, all that lies deep inside the cold, fragmented quotidian characters with which our earthly, at times bitter and tedious path swarms...", as if he is another Chichkov, a writer seeking recognition for his work, but feeling that the minor distractions that haunt his thoughts prevent him from realising his literary ambitions, just as Chichikov does not realise his landowning aspirations.
The novel is littered with ethereal beings like the half formed table-guest of whom Gogol writes, "...It was hard to say definitely who she was, a married lady or a spinster, a relative, the housekeeper or a woman simply living in the house - something without a cap, about 30, and wearing a multicoloured shawl. There are people that exist on this earth not as objects in themselves, but as extraneous specks or tiny spots on objects. They sit in the same place, they hold their heads in the same way and you are almost ready to take them for a piece of furniture..." But spectral as such characters may seem, they can be heard in the near distance with some distinctness, whether in bedrooms above, or the maids' room or the pantry.

Chichikov recalls Goncharov's Oblomov in his love of earthly comforts, despite his interest in the realm of the dead, journeying with a well-equipped travelling box and a snuff box. Yet he is aware of his own human absurdity, as when he sees a Cossack dancer, describing him grotesquely as "an adult, a full-grown man suddenly leaps out all in black, plucked like a bird and wrapped up tight like a little devil, and then starts pumping his legs up and down."

Gogol's authorial voice asks of the reader whether Chichikov is "moral or immoral", but anticipates by providing his own answer: "Everything undergoes a rapid transformation in man. Before you know it, a dreadful worm has grown within him, and tyrannically sucked off all the vital juices for itself." The moral complacency of Chichikov, or anyone else who delves into the incomprehensible, with a view to deceive himself or others, will find himself overwhelmed by an ephemeral nemesis.
Gavigamand
i very loved this book his funny and sad about russia slaves the word dead souls its not only about the slaves its about their masters as plushkin,sobakevich and the others i realy love gogol he have lote of humor revisor is a great play