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by Verlyn Flieger

eBook Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien's World download ISBN: 0873387449
Author: Verlyn Flieger
Publisher: The Kent State University Press; Revised edition (January 28, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1148 kb
Fb2: 1467 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf txt doc mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Verlyn Flieger first published this book in the early 1980s, only a few years after the publication of The Silmarillion.

Verlyn Flieger first published this book in the early 1980s, only a few years after the publication of The Silmarillion. Many of the essays in this work deal with Flieger's analysis of the influence on Tolkien of his fellow Inkling, Owen Barfield.

Splintered Light book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

This collection includes two of Tolkien's best fairy stories. The world of Faery is the setting for Smith of Wootton Major

This collection includes two of Tolkien's best fairy stories. The world of Faery is the setting for Smith of Wootton Major. The preparation of Great Cake to mark the Feast of Good Children was a human, cheerful occasion, but other less material powers wer. Interrupted Music: The Making of Tolkien's Mythology. The content of Tolkien's Mythology, the Silmarillion, has been the subject of considerable exploration and analysis for many years, but the logistics of its development have been mostly ignored and deserve closer investigation

A great deal of work has been done in Tolkien studies since the present book was first written

A great deal of work has been done in Tolkien studies since the present book was first written. This is more than helpful; it is indispensable.

Splintered Light and Sundered Veil. Published by Thriftbooks.

Kent State University Press.

Free delivery worldwide. Tolkien is perhaps best known for ""The Hobbit"" and ""The Lord of the Rings"", but it is in ""The Silmarillion"" that the true-depth of Tolkien's Middle-earth can be understood.

J. R. R. Tolkien is perhaps best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but it is in The Silmarillion that the true depth of Tolkien’s Middle-earth can be understood. The Silmarillion was written before, during, and after Tolkien wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. A collection of stories, it provides information alluded to in Tolkien’s better known works and, in doing so, turns The Lord of the Rings into much more than a sequel to The Hobbit, making it instead a continuation of the mythology of Middle-earth. Verlyn Flieger’s expanded and updated edition of Splintered Light, a classic study of Tolkien’s fiction first published in 1983, examines The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings in light of Owen Barfield’s linguistic theory of the fragmentation of meaning. Flieger demonstrates Tolkien’s use of Barfield’s concept throughout the fiction, showing how his central image of primary light splintered and refracted acts as a metaphor for the languages, peoples, and history of Middle-earth.
Comments: (7)
Grillador
Verlyn Flieger first published this book in the early 1980s, only a few years after the publication of The Silmarillion. It was the first important study of Tolkien's great story, and this Revised Edition, published twenty years later, has additional value because the longer time period allows deeper perspective.

Many of the essays in this work deal with Flieger's analysis of the influence on Tolkien of his fellow Inkling, Owen Barfield. Barfield had developed a linguistic theory of the fragmentation (or splintering) of meaning, which caused Tolkien to rethink many of his own ideas on philology. Flieger demonstrates that Tolkien used Barfield's concept throughout his writings, but most especially in the stories and tales which became The Silmarillion. Flieger's masterly retelling and analyses of many of those tales, especially those dealing with Feanor's creation of the Silmarils, their theft by Morgoth after his destruction of the Two Trees of Valinor, and the ensuing rebellion of the Noldor breathe fresh life into words that I have dearly loved ever since first reading them in 1977.

Splintered Light, like the rest of Flieger's work, is a highly scholarly but accessible and fascinating work. All lovers of the worlds created by J.R.R. Tolkien owe it to themselves to read and savor Flieger's fascinating analyses.
Wenes
I have read enough about and by Dr. Tolkien that it is difficult for me to find something fresh or new. But this book goes back to the first parts of Tolkien's creation to the Music of the Ainur and how it informs everything that follows - even to the singing of Tom Bombadil to show how really old he is. This is not a book for me to read in one sitting. It takes some thought and in some way is more like a text than a review or survey. But if you seriously want to know about Tolkien's vision and his desire to revive a English mythology, this is the book for you. It is all there from Music to LIght to Language.
Uriel
This is another of Flieger's book that focuses on a specialized aspect of Middle-earth as the other book, A Question of Time, did. This one is more centered on The Silmarillion and on the idea of language. It speaks of Feanor's creation of the Silmarils and what happened because of that event and his inability to let go of his possession, as later Frodo will be unable to do, and of Beren and Thingol and much else in that immensely detailed tapestry of the early history of the Elves, Dwarves and Men.

It has also in the later chapters much of interest to say about Frodo and how he was "broken by a burden of fear and horror - broken down, and in the end made into something quite different," as the Professor wrote in one of his letters. "Filled with clear light" he was to become, though we see but the beginning of that transformation and can only guess that it continued after he went West. There is also an analysis of "The Sea-Bell" poem which is my favorite of mine due to its association with Frodo. Another very interesting book from Flieger and my favorite of hers. If you only read one of hers, read this one!
Rindyt
Finally a book that explains the differences among the Vanyar, Sindarin, and Noldorin elves; who the Calaquendi and Moriquendi were; why the story of Maeglin was important; in short, this book really put the Silmarillion into persepctive for me. As other reviewers have noted, Dr. Flieger explains not just Tolkien's literaure, but also Tolkien's philosophy. Anyone stumped by the Silmarillion should read this book. Anyone who loves Tolkien must read this book
Yanthyr
Excellent insights into Tolkiens use of mythic language.
Maucage
A wonderful work of literary criticism and scholarly analysis of Tolkien. Flieger delves deep into Middle-Earth and inspects all facets of Tolkien's world. I highly recommend this for all Tolkien fans interested in the linguistics behind the mastermind.
Aria
highly recommended
This book will change your perspective not only on The Lord of the Rings, but on life in general. I know it has done mine. The idea of language developing from mythology, and not the other way round as has been the common conception, was a new one to me when I read this book. Though I had always held the belief that God, myth, and language are interconnected ("In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God") I had never fully grasped the impact and full meaning of that until I read this book.Owen Barfield's theories, whilst interesting, were always just slightly abstruse for me: Verlyn Flieger has done me - and the rest of the literary world - a great service in setting forth and clarifying such excellent reasoning.
Though it is highly technical in some parts - most specifically in the chapters on the etymology, significance and meaning of names - it is as riveting as a first-rate mystery. I found myself unable to put it down. As all good books do, it definitely warrants a second, third, fourth, and fifth reading, and will not get old with repeated study. Hobbyist philologists (like me) and anyone interested in language, myth, religion, philosophy, or The Lord of the Rings (which adroitly combines all four) must read this book. It will change your life and your outlook on the world and our relation to it and its Maker.