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by James Campbell

eBook This Is the Beat Generation: New York-San Francisco-Paris download ISBN: 0520230337
Author: James Campbell
Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (November 5, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 340
ePub: 1577 kb
Fb2: 1981 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw mbr lrf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds th. .

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds th.This book is interesting because James Campbell is not American, he's Scottish and barely knew any of the writers. He has lots of information that he's gathered but sometimes I think he draws odd conclusions from a small amount of fact. For instance, when he tries to paint Kerouac and Ginsberg as racist. I've never read any substantial evidence of that. A well written and entertaining history of not just the Beat Generation but also the period of time in primarily New York, Paris and San Francisco. Aug 07, 2015 Samantha Emily Evans rated it it was amazing.

Thankfully, James Campbell dishes out plenty of both in "This Is the Beat Generation, wherein he chronicles .

Thankfully, James Campbell dishes out plenty of both in "This Is the Beat Generation, wherein he chronicles one of the most (in)famous literary movements of the twentieth century. This book nicely illustrates, in a tone neither worshipful nor deploring, how resolutely the Beat movement was borne out of friendship, and is often less tiresome than reading actual beat writing. James Campbell is the author of Exiled in Paris: Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Samuel Beckett and Others on the Left Bank(1995), Talking at the Gates: A Life.

That evening, Ginsberg gave a reading at St James's Church, Piccadilly, where William Blake was baptized. He was exuberant and spontaneous, yet had everything under control.

This Is the Beat Generation: New York, San Francisco, Paris (1999). Thom Gunn in Conversation with James Campbell (2000). Syncopations: Beats, New Yorkers, and Writers in the Dark (2008). Williams, Bob (7 September 2008). The Compulsive Reader. Retrieved 4 December 2010.

His personal fascination for the Beat Generation, in particular Jack Kerouac, was sparked in 1971, but .

His personal fascination for the Beat Generation, in particular Jack Kerouac, was sparked in 1971, but he was frustrated that information about Beat writers and their books was hard to come by in the UK at that time. Ring and Beat Scene are acknowledged sources in James Campbell's book, This Is the Beat Generation: New York–San Francisco-Paris.

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds the leading . In between, we move to San Francisco, where Ginsberg gave the first public reading of Howl.

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds the leading members of what was to become the Beat Generation in the shadows of madness and criminality. Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs had each seen the insides of a mental hospital and a prison by the age of thirty. A few months after they met, another member of their circle committed a murder that involved Kerouac and Burroughs as material witnesses. This book charts the transformation of these experiences into literature, and a literary movement that spread across the globe. In between, we move to San Francisco, where Ginsberg gave the first public.

James Campbell visits a new exhibition at the Pompidou Centre and a pivotal moment in cultural history. James Campbell is the author of Paris Interzone and This Is the Beat Generation: New York, San Francisco, Paris

James Campbell visits a new exhibition at the Pompidou Centre and a pivotal moment in cultural history. James Campbell is the author of Paris Interzone and This Is the Beat Generation: New York, San Francisco, Paris. Beat Generation is at Centre Pompidou, Paris, until 3 October.

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds the leading members of what was to become the Beat Generation in the . I started reading this book with little prior knowledge of the beat movement and authors. I also didn't expect much from the book, thinking that it would probably be a rather academic piece of writing. And what a pleasant surprise it turned out to be! The book was so gripping that I finished it in a few days, reading long passages at a time.

The Beat Generation' refers to a group of authors whose literature explored and influenced American culture in the .

The Beat Generation' refers to a group of authors whose literature explored and influenced American culture in the post-World War II er. After moving west to San Francisco, the group added core members Gary Snyder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti (one of the founders City Lights Bookstore), Michael McClure, Philip Whalen, and Lew Welch. Since then, Beat culture has been entwined with the city of San Francisco.

Beginning in New York in 1944, James Campbell finds the leading members of what was to become the Beat Generation in the shadows of madness and criminality. Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs had each seen the insides of a mental hospital and a prison by the age of thirty. A few months after they met, another member of their circle committed a murder that involved Kerouac and Burroughs as material witnesses. This book charts the transformation of these experiences into literature, and a literary movement that spread across the globe. From "The First Cut-Up"--the murder in New York in 1944--we end up in Paris in 1960 with William Burroughs at the Beat Hotel, experimenting with the technique that made him notorious, what Campbell calls "The Final Cut-Up." In between, we move to San Francisco, where Ginsberg gave the first public reading of Howl. We discover Burroughs in Mexico City and Tangiers; the French background to the Beats; the Buddhist influence on Kerouac, Gary Snyder, and others; the "Muses" Herbert Huncke and Neal Cassady; the tortuous history of On the Road; and the black ancestry of the white hipster.
Comments: (2)
Fast Lovebird
I started reading this book with little prior knowledge of the beat movement and authors. I also didn't expect much from the book, thinking that it would probably be a rather academic piece of writing. And what a pleasant surprise it turned out to be! The book was so gripping that I finished it in a few days, reading long passages at a time. It covers the rise to prominence of the dramatis personae of the beat movement (focusing on Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs), giving enough information on their backgrounds to facilitate an understanding of how this influenced them and their writing, but does not dwell on unnecessary minutiae in the process. All the information is presented in a concise and remarkably readable manner. The author points out the foibles of the beats, but is not too judgemental, leaving it to the reader to come to his own conclusions.
But the best thing about this book is the way the author links events and people in a witty, intelligent way without falling into the very beat trap of being pretentious. It can serve as an example to all authors wishing to write an intelligent, accessible work of non-fiction.
Whitestone
[...]. But then I also suggest getting a subscription to the National Enquirer, for the same rhetoric to be found in that rag is to be found in this book's overtly slanted viewpoint. Every luminary in this significant literary and cultural movement is depicted as psychotic, criminal, racist, and sexually confused. Nothing positive about the Beat Generation is mentioned. Granted, the Beats had their personal faults, but who doesn't? Campbell does a great disservice to his readers by not presenting a balanced perspective of the Beats and the influence they have had around the world. If you're looking for fair, introspective commentary on the Beat Generation...look elsewhere.