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by Forrest G. Robinson

eBook The Author-Cat: Clemens's Life in Fiction download ISBN: 0823227871
Author: Forrest G. Robinson
Publisher: Fordham University Press; 1 edition (November 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1233 kb
Fb2: 1506 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi rtf lrf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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Are you an author? Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and . The Author-Cat: Clemens's Life in Fiction Nov 15, 2007. by Forrest G. Robinson.

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Forrest Robinson is Distinguished Professor of English at University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the author of numerous books and articles including In Bad Faith: The Dynamics of Deception in Mark Twain's America; The Author-Cat: Clemens' Life in Fiction; and The Jester and the Sages: Mark Twain in Conversation with Nietzsche, Freud, and Marx. External metadata update. 2019-02-21T11:16:43Z.

Forrest Robinson examines the dynamic that leads Samuel Clemens to disclose inadvertently more about . With this as a guiding idea Robinson offers tantalizing and complicated readings of familiar events in Clemens' life

Forrest Robinson examines the dynamic that leads Samuel Clemens to disclose inadvertently more about himself in his travel writing and fiction than he is capable of revealing when he turns to autobiography, a medium in which the ' own term-too easily rakes dirt over painful truths. With this as a guiding idea Robinson offers tantalizing and complicated readings of familiar events in Clemens' life. Incidents are reexamined in terms of how they surface in the fiction and the thread of guilt and denial is traced as it manifests throughout the work from The Innocents Abroad to The Mysterious Stranger.

new light on a tormented moral life

Forrest G. Robinson argues that, by contrast, it is in his fiction that Clemens most fully-if often s himself. new light on a tormented moral life. His book challenges conventional assumptions about the humorist's personality and creativity, directing attention to what William Dean Howells describes as the depths of a nature whose tragical seriousness broke in the laughter which the unwise took for the whole of him. eISBN: 978-0-8232-4746-2.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Having It Both Ways: Self-Subversion in Western Popular Classics. ISBN 9780826317506 (978-0-8263-1750-6) Softcover, Univ of New Mexico Pr, 1996. Coauthors & Alternates.

Main Author: Robinson, Forrest G. 1940-. Corporate Authors: ProQuest (Firm).

Export to EndNoteWeb. The author-cat Clemens's life in fiction /. Main Author: Robinson, Forrest G.

Robinson Crusoe (/ˈkruːsoʊ/) is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published on 25 April 1719.

Gaining a cat’s confidence is different from gaining the confidence of any other animal.

Robinson takes no care for the honour of his family. I began to reflect on Robinson’s lordly estates. Ping-pong with a cat is a simplified and more individualistic form of the proper game. You play it close to the ground, and you imagine the net. Gaining a cat’s confidence is different from gaining the confidence of any other animal.

His attempt to tell the unvarnished truth about himself is preserved in nearly 250 autobiographical dictations.

At the end of his long life, Samuel Clemens felt driven to write a truthful account of what he regarded as the flaws in his character and the errors of his ways. His attempt to tell the unvarnished truth about himself is preserved in nearly 250 autobiographical dictations. In order to encourage complete veracity, he decided from the outset that these would be published only posthumously.

Nevertheless, Clemens’s autobiography is singularly unrevealing. Forrest G. Robinson argues that, by contrast, it is in his fiction that Clemens most fully―if often inadvertently―reveals himself. He was, he confessed, like a cat who labors in vain to bury the waste that he has left behind. Robinson argues that he wrote out of an enduring need to come to terms with his remembered experiences―not to memorialize the past, but to transform it.

By all accounts―including his own―Clemens’s special curse was guilt. He was unable to forgive himself for the deaths of those closest to him―from his siblings’ death in childhood to the deaths of his own children. Nor could he reconcile himself to his role in the Civil War, his part in the duel that prompted his departure from Virginia City in 1864, and―worst of all―his sense of moral complicity in the crimes of slavery.

Tracing the theme of bad faith in all of Clemens’s major writing, but with special attention to the late work, Robinson sheds new light on a tormented moral life. His book challenges conventional assumptions about the humorist’s personality and creativity, directing attention to what William Dean Howells describes as “the depths of a nature whose tragical seriousness broke in the laughter which the unwise took for the whole of him.”