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eBook The English Fable: Aesop and Literary Culture, 1651-1740 (Cambridge Studies in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Thought) download

by Jayne Elizabeth Lewis

eBook The English Fable: Aesop and Literary Culture, 1651-1740 (Cambridge Studies in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Thought) download ISBN: 0521025311
Author: Jayne Elizabeth Lewis
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (March 30, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 248
ePub: 1593 kb
Fb2: 1918 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw mobi rtf lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were published in England

Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were published in England. In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the explosion of interest in fable from its origins at the end of the English Civil Wars to its decline, and shows how three Augustan writers - John Dryden, Anne Finch and John Gay - experimented with fable as a literary form.

In this book, the author explores how Aesop and his fables helped to shape English literature. She explains how people in England took a sudden interest in Aesop between the years 1651 and 1740 in response to sociopolitical crisis. Welcome to Aesop's Fables. This source provides Aesop’s fables as retold by students enrolled in a class at the University of Massachusetts

The English Fable book

The English Fable book. Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were published in England. In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the explosion of interest in fable from its origins at the end of the English Civil Wars to its decline, and shows how three Augustan writers - John Dryden, Anne Finch and John Gay - Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were. published in England.

In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the explosion of interest in fable from its origins at the end of the . Paperback or Softback. Condition: New. The English Fable: Aesop and Literary Culture,. Seller Inventory BBS-9780521025317.

In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the explosion of interest in fable from its origins at the end of the English Civil Wars to its decline, and shows how three Augustan writers - John Dryden, Anne Finch and John Gay - experimented with fable as a literary form.

Fables, Winchilsea, Anne Kingsmill Finch, Countess of, 1661-1720 - Criticism and interpretation, Aesop's fables - Parodies, imitations, etc, Animals in literature, English literature - Greek influences, English literature - 18th century - History and criticism, English literature - Early modern, 1500-1700 - History and criticism, Fables, English - History and criticism, Politics and literature - Great Britain - History - 17th century, Politics and literature - Great Britain - History - 18th century. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press.

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Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were published in England. In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the national obsession with Aesop's fables during this period as both a figural response to sociopolitical crises, and an antidote to emerging anxieties about authorship.

Cambridge Studies in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Thought (20). Collections: Show more. This new study of the origins of the English novel argues that the novel emerged from historical writing. This 1993 book looks at Dryden's literary relationships with Ben Jonson and with French authors (notably Corneille), at issues raised by the work thought to be his greatest by Romantic and contemporary readers, Fables Ancient and Modern; and at Samuel Johnson's definition of Dryden, whose biography in Johnson's Lives was the author's favourite.

In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the national obsession with Aesop's fables during this period as both a figural response to sociopolitical crises, and an antidote to emerging anxieties about authorship.

In The English Fable, Jayne Elizabeth Lewis describes the national obsession with Aesop's fables during this period as both a figural response to sociopolitical crises, and an antidote to emerging anxieties about authorship

The English Fable : Aesop and Literary Culture, 1651-1740.

The English Fable : Aesop and Literary Culture, 1651-1740. It ask what about fables encouraged their survival, indeed their proliferation, in a contentious and transitional age.

Between 1651 and 1740 hundreds of fables, fable collections, and biographies of the ancient Greek slave Aesop were published in England. Jayne Elizabeth Lewis decribes the explosion of interest in fable from its origins at the end of the English Civil Wars to its decline, and shows how three Augustan writers--John Dryden, Anne Finch and John Gay--experimented with fable as a literary form. Often underestimated because of its links with popular nonliterary forms, fable is shown to have played a major role in the formation of the modern English culture.