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by Alex Zwerdling

eBook Improvised Europeans: American Literary Expatriates In London download ISBN: 0465032753
Author: Alex Zwerdling
Publisher: Basic Books; First Edition edition (May 28, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 400
ePub: 1278 kb
Fb2: 1266 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit mobi mobi rtf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Alex Zwerdling is Letters and Science Alumni Distinguished Professor of English at the University of. .

Alex Zwerdling is Letters and Science Alumni Distinguished Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the author of Orwell and the Left and Virginia Woolf and the Real World. Through the exploration of the lives and works of four profoundly influential American literary "insurgents," Zwerdling tells the story of their transgenerational fight to clear a space for the recognition of the worthiness American literature among English and European elites.

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American power was expanding and American writers-including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Whitman-were . In striving to answer these questions, Alex Zwerdling illuminates the lives and careers of Henry Adams, Henry James, .

American power was expanding and American writers-including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Whitman-were acclaimed at home and abroad. England’s condescending air toward America had already become inappropriate. Eliot, and Ezra Pound as never before. These men chose to live their lives abroad at a crucial point in American history, both domestically and internationally. The massive influx of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe began to whittle away the Anglo-Saxon majority.

Includes bibliographical references and index. The transatlantic slanging match - The reconciliation fantasy - Anglo-Saxon panic - Henry Adams's baffled patriotism - Adams adrift, 1890-1918 - Henry James's cosmopolitan opportunity - James's patriotic readers and the perils of transatlantic union - Henry James: the return of the native - Ezra Pound: the appearance of the. Comet - Pound's meteoric descent - . Eliot's career strategy - Displacing Eliot's poetry.

The ambivalence of pen-toting expatriates is Zwerdling's absorbing subject. That is, be remains unhappily American-and half erased by his own hand. And those expats are well known indeed: the Americans Henry Adams, Henry James, Erza Pound, and . Eliot, all of whom found themselves while living in London. Although Zwerdling's introductory chapters discussing broader cultural Anglo-American competition and attempted reconciliation are too discursive and extended to launch the book with the brio that it needs, his clarity and concision elsewhere give readers the guidance they require in following sometimes wayward footsteps.

Expatriation may have offered "a way of achieving abroad what no longer seems possible at home," but as Zwerdling observed of James, "being a citizen of the world might only be a glamorous name for homelessness

Expatriation may have offered "a way of achieving abroad what no longer seems possible at home," but as Zwerdling observed of James, "being a citizen of the world might only be a glamorous name for homelessness. Zwerdling offers many nuanced and thought-provoking insights without ever lapsing into theoretical jargon.

Improvised Europeans : American Literary Expatriates in London. by Zwerdling and Alex Zwerdling. American power was expanding and American writers-including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Whitman-were acclaimed at home and abroad.

Improvised Europeans. American literary expatriates and the siege of London. Published 1998 by Basic Books in New York. American Authors, American literature, Americans, Authors, American, Biography, English influences, History and criticism, Homes and haunts, Intellectual life, Modernisme (littérature), Résidences et lieux familiers, Exilschriftsteller, Intelectuais (influências), Vie intellectuelle, Amerikaans, Littérature américaine, Literatura norte-americana (história e crítica), Histoire, Écrivains américains, Schrijvers, Schriftsteller,.

At the turn of the century the United States seemed poised to overtake its European rivals on all fronts; its many strengths were finally being recognized—the wealth of resources, the profusion of ideas and innovation, and the artistic talent of its citizens. American power was expanding and American writers—including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Whitman—were acclaimed at home and abroad. England's condescending air toward America had already become inappropriate. The United States had reached a new level of respectability in the world. In light of this favorable international climate, why then did some of America's most talented young writers travel to London to become, as Henry Adams put it, ”improvised Europeans”?Few writers have been studied and analyzed as much as the quartet at the heart of this book. But Alex Zwerdling was perplexed by this shared and often overlooked aspect of their background: Why, at the dawn of the American century, did these writers choose to go ”back” to what was called ”the Old World”? And why would these brilliant thinkers include in some of their most acclaimed work material that is today reviled as offensive—anti-Semetic, racist, anti-feminist? What was happening in the United States that repelled them? In striving to answer these questions, Alex Zwerdling illuminates the lives and careers of Henry Adams, Henry James, T.S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound as never before.These men chose to live their lives abroad at a crucial point in American history, both domestically and internationally. The massive influx of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe began to whittle away the Anglo-Saxon majority. The end of slavery created a renewal of efforts to make true the Constitution's claim to universal equality. Women's confidence and authority grew as they fought for independence and their own rights. These developments, Zwerdling argues, were large factors in why these four writers fled. He examines their works and their lives in the context of the American scene they left, and also in the context of the British scene they left for. His brilliant cultural history uses personal correspondence, unprinted articles, and other previously unknown sources to unravel the historical forces that shaped these literary lions. Depicting their careers as a roller-coaster ride through alien territory, the book shows that they produced extraordinary work in the midst of perpetual friction, indifferece, and even active hostility.