carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Music and the Irish Literary Imagination

eBook Music and the Irish Literary Imagination download

by Harry White

eBook Music and the Irish Literary Imagination download ISBN: 0199547327
Author: Harry White
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1838 kb
Fb2: 1660 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr lit txt azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Harry White examines the influence of music in the development of the Irish literary imagination from 1800 to the present day. He identifies music as a preoccupation which originated in the poetry of Thomas Moore early in the nineteenth century.

Harry White examines the influence of music in the development of the Irish literary imagination from 1800 to the present day. He argues that this preoccupation decisively influenced Moore's attempt to translate the 'meaning' of Irish music into verse, and that it also informed Moore's considerable impact on the development of European musical romanticism, as in the music of Berlioz and Schumann. He identifies music as a preoccupation which originated in the poetry of Thomas Moore early in the nineteenth century

Download books for free.

Download books for free. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Terence Killeen, Irish Times. Harry Whites Music and the Irish Literary Imagination is one of those rare, seismic books that shakes up and rearranges the ground beneath its readers. It is beautifully conceived and written: detailed, nuanced, eloquent, persuasive, and at times, very funny.

Yeats and the music of poetry Why . Synge abandoned music Opera and drama : Bernard Shaw and "The brandy of the damned" The 'thought-tormented music' of James Joyce Words after music : Samuel Beckett after Joyce Operas of the Irish mind : Brian Friel and music. Words alone : Seamus Heaney, music, and the jurisdiction of literary forms. M85 W458 30112071676081 1.

Home Journals Music & Letters 2012 Vol. 93 No. 1. Music and the Irish Literary Imagination. Thomson, A. J. (2012) Music and the Irish Literary Imagination In: Music & Letters, Vol. 93, No. 1, pp. 86-89.

Music and Letters, Volume 93, pp 93; doi:10. Keywords: Music, Harry White, Irish Literary Imagination. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Novelist Morrison takes a turn as a literary critic, examining the American literary imagination and finding it obsessed . I've read all of Toni Morrison's books which always takes the reader to the place and time of the characters she creates.

Novelist Morrison takes a turn as a literary critic, examining the American literary imagination and finding it obsessed with the white/black polarity. From beginning to end of each story, Morrison concludes a lesson that preceded adversity which withstands the storms of life. I would recommend this book to people.

This new reading of Irish literature identifies, for the first time, the formative influence of music in Irish writing over the past 200 years

This new reading of Irish literature identifies, for the first time, the formative influence of music in Irish writing over the past 200 years.

Harry White examines the influence of music in the development of the Irish literary imagination from 1800 to the present day. He identifies music as a preoccupation which originated in the poetry of Thomas Moore early in the nineteenth century. He argues that this preoccupation decisively influenced Moore's attempt to translate the 'meaning' of Irish music into verse, and that it also informed Moore's considerable impact on the development of European musical romanticism, as in the music of Berlioz and Schumann. White then examines how this preoccupation was later recovered by W.B. Yeats, whose poetry is imbued with music as a rival presence to language. In its readings of Yeats, Synge, Shaw and Joyce, the book argues that this striking musical awareness had a profound influence on the Irish literary imagination, to the extent that poetry, fiction and drama could function as correlatives of musical genres. Although Yeats insisted on the synonymous condition of speech and song in his poetry, Synge, Shaw and Joyce explicitly identified opera in particular as a generic prototype for their own work. Synge's formal musical training and early inclinations as a composer, Shaw's perception of himself as the natural successor to Wagner, and Joyce's no less striking absorption of a host of musical techniques in his fiction are advanced in this study as formative (rather than incidental) elements in the development of modern Irish writing. Music and the Irish Literary Imagination also considers Beckett's emancipation from the oppressive condition of words in general (and Joyce in particular) through the agency of music, and argues that the strong presence of Mendelssohn, Chopin and Janácek in the works of Brian Friel is correspondingly essential to Friel's dramatization of Irish experience in the aftermath of Beckett. The book closes with a reading of Seamus Heaney, in which the poet's own preoccupation with the currency of established literary forms is enlisted to illuminate Heaney's abiding sense of poetry as music.