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by Dorothy Parker

eBook The Portable Dorothy Parker download ISBN: 0140150749
Author: Dorothy Parker
Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised, Enlarged edition (December 9, 1976)
Language: English
Pages: 640
ePub: 1555 kb
Fb2: 1255 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx lit mobi txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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The Portable Dorothy Parker book.

The portable Dorothy Parker. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

The Portable Dorothy Park. has been added to your Cart. Dorothy Parker was born in West End, New Jersey, in 1893 and grew up in New York, attending a Catholic convent school and Miss Dana's School in Morristown, New Jersey

The Portable Dorothy Park. Dorothy Parker was born in West End, New Jersey, in 1893 and grew up in New York, attending a Catholic convent school and Miss Dana's School in Morristown, New Jersey. She then became drama critic of Vanity Fair and the central figure of the celebrated Algonquin Round Table.

Parker died of a heart attack at the age of 73 in 1967. In her will, she bequeathed her estate to the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. foundation. Following King's death, her estate was passed on to the NAACP. Библиографические данные.

Dorothy Parker, more than any of her contemporaries, captured the spirit of the Jazz Age in her poetry and prose, and The Collected Dorothy Parker includes an introduction by Brendan Gill in Penguin Modern.

Dorothy Parker, more than any of her contemporaries, captured the spirit of the Jazz Age in her poetry and prose, and The Collected Dorothy Parker includes an introduction by Brendan Gill in Penguin Modern Classics. Dorothy Parker was the most talked-about. Points of View: An Anthology of Short Stories. Many of the 44 stories come from a new writing generation with a contemporary c. Dorothy Parker: In Her Own Words. by Dorothy Parker · Barry Day. 2004·.

Dorothy Parker Rose Petal Gin is made with pink and red rose petals and crushed elderberries – one of the key . As when you dip into the Portable Dorothy Parker book, you will love your encounter in this theater piece with Parker's unique voice and experience.

Dorothy Parker Rose Petal Gin is made with pink and red rose petals and crushed elderberries – one of the key botanicals in the core. The Portable Dorothy Parker. EVA HEINEMANN ADDS: This was beyond enjoyable and so informative.

Dorothy Parker was born in West End, New Jersey, in 1893 and grew up in New York, attending a Catholic convent school and Miss Dana's School in Morristown, New Jersey

Dorothy Parker was born in West End, New Jersey, in 1893 and grew up in New York, attending a Catholic convent school and Miss Dana's School in Morristown, New Jersey. She then became drama critic of Vanity Fair and the central figure of the celebrated Algonquin Round Table

The Portable Dorothy Parker. A female humor writer before Tina Fey. (Although I do love Tina Fey too. The Portable Dorothy Parker (I am not sure what this pulp noir cover is all about though, I like the original hardcover much better).

Stories, poems, articles, and reviews by the American humorist reveal the range of her wit and satire
Comments: (7)
Kazimi
I picked up this book because I have been reading other books that have quoted her. These quotes are often very funny. "This book should not be put down lightly," she said. "It should be thrown against the wall." Add to this that she was a member of that famous or infamous roundtable at the Algonquin, and I thought her stories and reviews would be a riot. I was surprised that in the cover portrait of her she seemed so sad. When I began to read some of the poems and stories, it was obvious that the cover photograph was appropriate. I now see her as a terribly lonely person who thought about death too much. Her acerbic wit seems to be camouflage. The fact that I was surprised by what I found in this collection of her writing doesn't mean that I thought it was bad. Because Dorothy Parker was different from what I expected, doesn't mean she was worse than I expected--just different.
Skiletus
Before purchasing this, I owned the Modern Library edition, "The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker." Having laid hands on this Viking Portable, I sold off the other and now prize this. Though it comes in softcovers, there's a more bountiful selection of Parker from a broader range of her works, especially among the best of her "Constant Reader" reviews for "The New Yorker." If you love Parker, you're sure to appreciate this collection. If you haven't had the pleasure of meeting her, I know of no better introduction.
Braned
Could I love Dorothy Parker any more?? Her stories have given me so much to think about and chew on. I first read this almost 2 decades ago, and the stories still resonate with me. I reread and learn even more from them. I could live without the poetry, but the other stuff is incredible. You get a snapshot of what life was like from 1919-1950's (different stories showcase different eras) but more importantly there are lessons and themes that resonate just as much today. They are unchanging. Dorothy, I would have loved to be your pal.
Usishele
It's not enough to say that Dorothy Parker was great, or that she was brilliant. It's hard to see from a distance her colossal impact on the literary world. When you buy this book (and you WILL buy it; these aren't the droids you're looking for) immediately read some of the very earliest stories. They are of WWI vintage or so. If you remember high school literature, short stories written just before Parker put pen to paper were the somewhat longer "chapter of a novel" type, of Guy de Maupassant, or W. Somerset Maugham. Dorothy Parker virtually invented the "slice of life" short story, which she brought to the New Yorker. This style became the standard of the fledgling magazine, popular with the public, and without a doubt helped get the magazine off the ground.
This style is still the pervasive one today.
Short stories were not all Mrs. Parker wrote. She wrote play reviews, and as Constant Reader book reviews. She could dismiss a play with "House Beautiful is Play Lousy," or take down her least favored AA Milne with "Tonstant Weader frowed up." She once spent the better part of a review complaining about her hang-over. She kept New Yorker readers coming back week after week, laugh junkies after a fix. And so she changed the voice of the reviewer as well. Previously, the reviewer voice had been detached and quite dry, rattling off obligatory lines about the costumes, the sets, the leading actor, the leading actress-- as predictable as the label on a shampoo bottle. The wonderful Libby Gelman-Waxner is her direct descendent. Pauline Kael is a niece, although she might have bristled at the suggestion. Andrew Harris and Elvis Mitchell can thank Mrs. Parker for their unfettered freedom.
The best thing about reading this collection is discovering the sheer joy Mrs. Parker took in writing. She was good and she knew it.
She once said, in reviewing the unfortunate book Debonair, that the curse of a satirist is that "she writes superbly of the things she hates," but when she tries to write of things she likes, "the result is appalling." Personally, I find Parker moving and eloquent in her reviews of the Journal of Katherine Mansfield, and Isadora Duncan's posthumously published autobiography, two books that touched and impressed her, but it is true that her distinctive voice croons most seductively when she doesn't like something. Unfortunately, one is left with the impression that she didn't like much other than gin, Seconal and dogs, but I don't think that's true. If she were as unhappy as is commonly believed, she would have escalated her suicidal behavior, and not have lived to the age of 74. She would not have had the passion to march for the acquittal of Sacco and Venzetti, to travel to Spain during the country's civil war, to volunteer as a war correspondent during WWII, and to join in voice and body the civil rights movement in her last decade.
I think disdain rather than anger is a better word for what she felt towards the targets of her wit-- and it is true that sometimes a retrospective view of her own behavior was the target, but the ability to laugh at oneself is the sign of, well, if not mental health, at least a well-rounded emotional self.
And by the way, since Parker had no heirs, she left her estate, including future earnings from her work, to Dr. Martin Luther King jr., and when he sadly died the year after she did, he passed on the right to profit from the Parker works to the NAACP, so for every copy of this book sold, the author's cut profits the NAACP.
Rainshaper
Already owned one copy. I bought this copy as a graduation present for a loved one.
santa
I bought this book just for "The Waltz". I read it in high school, and laughed so hard I could hardly breathe. As soon as I got the book, it was the first thing I read, and again, I could hardly breathe! I'm so glad it hadn't lost its charm <3
Kemath
Her conversations, filled with wit, were superior to her literary efforts, filled with gloom. As a study on how to select and use words, these stories are edifying, but their content is depressing.
I am late to appreciate this fine woman's poetry. A few quotes from a friend is what got me interested. When you learn of her work, you'll want this book so you won't have to track down her work from so many decades. Sharp of tongue and crisp of wit, this fine collection will give many a cold rainy afternoon's armchair & hot cocoa the polish it so richly deserves.