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by Linda M. Lewis

eBook Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face With God download ISBN: 0826211461
Author: Linda M. Lewis
Publisher: University of Missouri; First edition (January 27, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1142 kb
Fb2: 1131 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf lit lrf mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Elizabeth Barrett Browning believed that "Christ's religion is essentially poetry-poetry glorified

Elizabeth Barrett Browning believed that "Christ's religion is essentially poetry-poetry glorified. In Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress, Linda M. Lewis studies Browning's religion as poetry, her poetry as religion. The book interprets Browning's literary life as an arduous spiritual quest-the successive stages being a rejection of Promethean pride for Christ-like hu Elizabeth Barrett Browning believed that "Christ's religion is essentially poetry-poetry glorified

Linda M. Lewis is the author of Germaine De Staël, George Sand, and the Victorian Woman Artist (. 0 avg .

Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 1806-1861 Religion. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Lewis, Linda M. Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face with Go. Most Popular Documents for ENGLISH 2319. Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face with God. Columbia: University of Missouri, 1998.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's spiritual progress: face to face with God. University of Missouri Press. Encyclopedia Article. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Maria Edgeworth, Henry James, Ella Hepworth Dixon, Henrik Ibsen. "Barrett Browning Institute". Retrieved 22 September 2014.

as Linda M. Lewis (Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Spiritual Progress In the correspondence Barrett Browning kept with the Reverend William Merry.

A Poets Work and Its Setting ), however, and more recent scholars such as Linda M. Lewis (Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Spiritual Progress. Face to Face with God ); Jerome Mazzaro ( Mapping Sublimity: Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese, in Critical Essays, 291–305); and Cynthia Scheinberg (Women’s Poetry and Religion in Victorian England: Jewish Identity and Christian Culture ) have focused on the strong Judeo-Christian.

Linda M. Lewis is Margaret H. Mountcastle Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas. She is the author of Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face with God (University of Missouri Press). Библиографические данные. The Promethean politics of Milton, Blake, and Shelley.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's spiritual progress : face to face with God /. Saved in: Main Author: Lewis, Linda . 1942-. Published: Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c1998. Subjects: Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 1806-1861 Religion. Mountcastle Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Bethany College in. .Shelly and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face with God (University of Missouri Press). She is the author of The Promethean Politics of Milton, Blake, and Shelly and Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress: Face to Face with God (University of Missouri Press). Germaine de Staël, George Sand, and the Victorian Woman Artist. Издание: иллюстрированное.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress : Face to Face with Go.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress : Face to Face with God. by Linda M. Lewis.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning believed that "Christ's religion is essentially poetry—poetry glorified." In Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress, Linda M. Lewis studies Browning's religion as poetry, her poetry as religion. The book interprets Browning's literary life as an arduous spiritual quest—the successive stages being a rejection of Promethean pride for Christ-like humility, affirmation of the gospels of suffering and of work, internalization of the doctrine of Apocalypse, and ascent to divine love and truth.

Lewis follows this religious crusade from the poet's childhood to her posthumous Last Poems--including such topics as her Bible reading, her introduction to the Greek church fathers and the English Protestant reformers, the theological debates in which she participated, her quarrel with the theology of Paradise Lost, and her scandalous involvement in mesmerism and Swedenborgianism. Using insights from contemporary feminist thought, Lewis argues that Browning's religious assumptions and insights range from the conventional to the iconoclastic and that women's spirituality is, for Browning as well as for other Victorian women writers, separate from orthodox patriarchy. Lewis demonstrates that Browning's political and social ideology--often labeled inconsistent and illogical—really makes sense in light of this spiritual quest, which leads her to confront her God "face to face."

Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress examines not only Browning's most admired works, such as Sonnets from the Portuguese and Aurora Leigh, but also her large body of political works and her important early poems—The Seraphim and A Drama of Exile. This intertextual book compares Browning's ideology to that of feminists such as Margaret Fuller, Harriet Martineau, and Florence Nightingale; influential conservatives such as Thomas Carlyle; and those most esteemed of Victorian poets, Alfred Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning.

Concluding with an examination of religion as a central focus of Victorian women poets, Lewis clarifies the ways in which Browning differs from Christina Rossetti, Felicia Hemans, Dora Greenwell, Jean Ingelow, and Mary Howitt. Elizabeth Barrett Browning's Spiritual Progress maintains that Browning's peculiar face-to-face struggle with the patristic and poetic tradition—as well as with God—sets her work apart.