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by Roy Meador,Marvin Mondlin

eBook Book Row: An Anecdotal and Pictorial History of the Antiquarian Book Trade download ISBN: 0786716525
Author: Roy Meador,Marvin Mondlin
Publisher: Carroll & Graf; 1st Carroll & Graf Trade Paperback Ed edition (October 19, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 416
ePub: 1333 kb
Fb2: 1814 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: azw mbr lit mobi
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Marvin Mondlin, Roy Meador. The American Story of the Bookstores on Fourth Avenue from the 1890s to the 1960s.

Marvin Mondlin, Roy Meador. New York City has eight million stories, and this one unfolds just south of Fourteenth Street in Manhattan, on the seven blocks of Fourth Avenue bracketed by Union Square and Astor Place

He is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America and numerous other book-related organizations.

He is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America and numerous other book-related organizations. Roy Meador, a book collector and freelance writer, has been published in such national periodicals as the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Smithsonian, and Analog.

He is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America and the author of Appraisals. He lives in New York City. Roy Meador was a book collector and freelance writer. His work was published in the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, Smithsonian, and Analog. He lived in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Библиографические данные. Book Row: An Anecdotal and Pictorial History of the Antiquarian Book Trade.

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Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Marvin Mondlin, Roy Meador.

Bibliographic Details. David Kaye David Kaye Books & Memorabilia 22745 Ventura Blvd. Publisher: Carroll & Graf New York. Publication Date: 2004. Woodland Hills, CA 91364 USA Tel: 818-224-4141 DavidKBooksl. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller. Bookseller: Bookseller: David Kaye Books & Memorabilia Address: Woodland Hills, CA, . AbeBooks Bookseller Since: October 9, 1998.

I had hopes of Book Row providing a glimpse into the past of the Manhattan neighborhood in which I live and a window into long-gone independently owned bookstores. It was instead a flood of trivial names and dates that provided very little context or description, and consequently very little to fuel understanding or the imagination.

Book-Row : An Anecdotal and Pictorial History of the Antiquarian Book Trade. by Marvin Mondlin, Marvin Modlin, Roy Meador. The city has eight million stories, and this one unfolds just south of 14th Street in Manhattan, mostly on the seven blocks of Fourth Avenue bracketed by Union Square and Astor Place.

An Anecdotal and Pictorial History of the Antiquarian Book Trade. By Marvin Mondlin and Roy Meador

An Anecdotal and Pictorial History of the Antiquarian Book Trade. By Marvin Mondlin and Roy Meador. Book Row remembers places that all lovers of books should never forget, like Biblo & Tamen, the shop that defied book-banning laws; the Green Book Shop, favored by John Dickson Carr; Ellenor Lowenstein’s world-renowned gastronomical Corner Book Shop (which was not on a corner); and the Abbey Bookshop, the last of the Fourth Avenue bookstores to close its doors.

Marvin Mondlin, Madeleine B. Stern.

The city has eight million stories, and this one unfolds just south of 14th Street in Manhattan, mostly on the seven blocks of Fourth Avenue bracketed by Union Square and Astor Place. There, for nearly eight decades, from the 1890s to the 1960s, thrived a bibliophiles' paradise. They called it the New York Booksellers' Row, or, more commonly, Book Row. It's an American story, the story that this richly anecdotal historical memoir amiably tells: as American as the rags-to-riches tale of the Strand, which began its life as book stall on Eighth Street and today houses 2.5 million volumes in twelve miles of space. It's a story cast with colorful characters: like the horse-betting, poker-playing go-getter and book dealer George D. Smith; the irascible Russian-born book hunter Peter Stammer, the visionary Theodore C. Schulte; Lou Cohen, founder of the still-surviving Argosy Book Store; gentleman bookseller George Rubinowitz and his legendary shrewd wife Jenny. Rising rents, street crime, urban redevelopment, television-the reasons are many for the demise of Book Row, but in this volume, based on interviews with dozens upon dozens of the book people who bought, sold, and collected there, it lives again.
Comments: (7)
Jusari
A wonderfully researched and well-written work. Reading this took me back to the mid-60s, when I traveled down with a friend to the East Village every Saturday to check out all the stores on Book Row, primarily searching for the works of Edgar Rice Burroughs. All the stores are here, with tales of their histories and owners.
X-MEN
My grandfather was a book dealer on Book Row, so I bought it to learn some more about his business.
Peras
Excellent.
Goldendragon
Very good
Early Waffle
This is a wonderful attempt to look at the century and a quarter of the world of Books,Bookstores,Booksellers,Book Buyers,Rare Book Collectors,Just Plain Avid Readers,The Normal as well as the Eccentric;but all Bibliophiles in one form or another; and what took place in Book Row of New York.What an amazing world it was, and a world that we are not likely to see again. While a street or section occupied by bookstores is not unique to New York,this was one of the most famous in the world. There still places where there are collections of bookstores,even some "Book Villages" that have a nostalgic ring to what Boor Row was,;but Book Row ,and all involved, was the real thing.
Most of what is talked about in this book went on long before my time as an avid reader,but I can still appreciate what a thrill it must have been to be a regular visitor to this place.
I think that the real value in reading this book is to see how greatly the whole experience of buying and selling of books,be they new,used,rare,expensive,cheap,or whatever;has changed so much and so quickly.About 25 or so years ago,when I seriously searched out books for my collection ,I visited literally hundreds of bookstores,particularly the Used & Rare ,and encountered a wide array of stores and sellers,and what a thrill to find a store that I had never been in;and find a new "treasure".Even when not finding anything,the bookseller and the store was still an experience.
However;what I used to call "going book sailing" is nothing what it used to be and many of the stores I used to haunt are "gone with the wind".I guess for the same reasons as with Book Row. The rents kept rising,buildings were demolished for highrises and condos,the Booksellers became old and didn't change with the rapidly changing world of books,the newer sellers who entered the trade have become a totally different breed,the Internet has changed everything and made an unbelievably amount of books and information about books available to any Book Lover,regardless of where he lives or what means are at his disposal.So,one by one the conventional bookstores have just withered and faded away.The price of gas has also made it expensive to run around the country to various bookstores.
The publishers are still churning out massive numbers of new titles ,reissues and books at such a rate that there are books everywhere,and at prices that vary all over the map;both for new and used books. For instance,many charities and university alumni groups have seen where they can obtain unlimited amounts of donations of books of every type and along with them lots of volunteers to sort,price and sell them to raise funds.These sales attract huge crowds,who make excellent finds. The curious thing is that a lot of the small time dealers are there scooping up books to sell on the Internet,at obviously much higher prices,and have become the buyers competitor rather than friend.In this book, the authors allude to the fact that many of the booksellers couldn't or wouldn't change and learn to buy and sell ,or otherwise,merchandise their books to retain their customers. The charities and others,changed the whole game,and greatly to the benefit of the buyers.If that wasn't a great enough deathnell;the Internet makes virtually any book one wants ,readily available at whatever,cost,rarity ,condition,etc. the buyer desires.No longer is it a matter of 'take what I got, at my price,or Good Luck".So,this book sure shows what the book world used to be;and what a wonderful world it was;but all that is a thing of the past.
Of all the great quotes you'll find in this book,and there are many;I think the quote that is most apropos is by someone who is not even a bookseller,book buyer or any kind of a Bibliophile ,and is found on page 365.

"Considering the long-ago past and eras that are gone with the wind on wings of time will seem a waste to those who dismiss ancient history as "weary,stale,flat and unprofitable." Baseball manager Sparky Anderson pointed out the futility of living in the past: "There's no future in it." A New York book dealer,quoted by the "New York Times" (May 31,1981),...and that was over 25 years ago...doubted the existence of serious interest among contemporary booksellers in the vanished shops of Fourth Avenue,which were no longer revalent to the needs and problems of modern bookstores: Those who remember them don't want to be reminded,and those who don't,won't care.It's like talking about a five-cent sandwich.No one knows what you are talking about."
Bibliophiles should give a big clap and thanks,to Marvin Mondlin and Roy Meador for bringing Book Row to those who have to be resolved with,"oh well,it was before my time,and so was the 25-cent bleacher seat and the 5-cent soda".
Fenritaur
I have to admit I'm divided on this book. As a 4-5 block slice of New York City history, it's thoroughly researched and reported and many times engaging, with some real characters from a decidedly off-center cache. And as an insider's look at a burgeoning book trade with more book shelves per square block than we're ever likely to see again (sadly), I found it in turn wistfully nostalgic in both the descriptions of dead booksellers and quotes from the ones still alive, and elegiac in its ruminations on the sad state of our post-Book Row culture.

The problem is, each of the things I liked about it work against it as well. Its narrow scope is problematic, at least within the framework Meador and Mondlin use, with many of the chapters seeming a lot like the ones before them with the names changed and a lot of factual repetition. And the nostalgia can get a little overbearing, with a pretty strong Neo-Luddite bias toward internet book dealers ("Those who had the books and the know-how might buy and sell books on the Net, but we'd like to hear Peter Stammer's, Sam Dauber's, and Jack Biblo's views of them as secondhand book dealers"). You could also say that as estate book buyer for the Strand Meador's neutrality might come into question, and you wouldn't be disproved with chapter titles like "The Strand Lives On" and almost a third of the glossy pictures devoted to the Bass family that runs the Strand.

In sum I'd say this is a book for book-industry specialists (especially the older ones who might recognize more of the names the authors drop without much historical grounding) and book buffs with enough interest to sift through 400 pages that could have easily been 200. I fall more into the latter than the former, but even then would recommend Chapters One, Two, Five, Nine, Eleven, Fourteen, Fifteen, the Appendix (a cool little pre-Book Row history of books in NYC), and the foreword by legendary book collector Madeleine B. Stern.
Ferri - My name
Reading Mondlin and Meador's descriptions of the long-gone used-book emporia that once graced Fourth Avenue in New York City both depressed and exhilarated me. Depressed, because I'll never have a chance to browse their musty aisles crowded with books. Exhilarated, because this volume successfully captures the thrill of browsing that I've experienced at the Strand bookstore (the sole Book Row survivor) and a few other stores. It's too bad the mindset of our culture has shifted to one in which an intelligent pleasure like browsing for good, cheap used books--in person, in a physical store--has been marginalized. Yes, Web bookbuying has its advantages, but still...I feel something precious has been lost.
It is refreshing to read books written by bibliophiles who express a true appreciation for fine books. They are true literary aesthetes. I've never known scholars or even poets to express such a love of books. Reading "Book Row" has inspired me to acquire more of the classics in fine editions. I think the authors were a little too dismissive of the Internet which has been a tremendous help to me in finding rare books. I no longer have to settle for what I find on the shelves in bookstores with bad taste in books. I can always find exactly what I want to read. The Internet is the greatest bookman there ever was!