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eBook Chemistry of Non-stoichiometric Compounds (Oxford Science Publications) download

by Koji Kosuge

eBook Chemistry of Non-stoichiometric Compounds (Oxford Science Publications) download ISBN: 0198555555
Author: Koji Kosuge
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 17, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1976 kb
Fb2: 1392 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

Chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds. Chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds. by. Kosuge, Kōji, 1937-.

Chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds. Crystals - Defects, Inorganic compounds. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled;.

As inorganic materials are put to more and more practical uses-mainly in electric, magnetic, and optical devices-materials scientists must have an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the chemical and physical properties of inorganic compounds.

What is this due to? We need to step back a little to some inorganic chemistry concepts for oxides.

Non-Stoichimetric defects Sources: Chemistry of Non-Stoichiometric Compounds, K. Kosuge, Oxford Science, 1994 Web page of Cava Lab, Waldner and Eriksson, Calphad Vol. 23, No. 2, pp. 189-218, 1999 The phase diagram of many oxides is exceedingly complicated. What is this due to? We need to step back a little to some inorganic chemistry concepts for oxides. Consider the simple example of SrTiO 3, a perovskite

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Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. This unified presentation of the chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds is the first monograph on the subject for two decades.

This unified presentation of the chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds is the first monograph on the subject for two . Koji Kosuge, Professor of Solid State Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto.

This unified presentation of the chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds is the first monograph on the subject for two decades.

This unified presentation of the chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds is the first monograph on the subject for .

Publications related to Inorganic Chemistry. This chapter deals with definition and classification of the nonstoichiometric compounds, and point defects in the nonstoichiometric compounds are introduced. In solid-state chemistry, nonstoichiometric compounds constitute a special type of solid-state compounds. ChemInform Abstract: CVD and Its Related Theories in Inorganic Synthesis and Materials Preparations.

To develop an appropriate theory of nonstoichiometric compounds, it is then necessary to address crystal-chemical and thermodynamic issues. This paper is also concerned with the defect structure of highly imperfect crystals of nonstoichiometric compounds with a broad homogeneity range: the concepts of defect and structural transition due to defect interactions and temperature effect. The thermodynamic aspect of the problem includes criteria for evaluating the stability of imperfect nonstoichiometric crystals

Chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds. Author: Kosuge, Koji, 1937-. Oxford science publications. Personal Author: Kosuge, Koji, 1937-. Uniform Title: Futeihi kagobutsu no kagaku. Publication Information: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 1994. Physical Description: x, 262 p. : ill. ; 24 cm. Series: Oxford science publications. Series Title: Oxford science publications. Subject Term: Crystals - Defects.

Non-stoichiometric compounds are chemical compounds with an elemental composition that cannot be represented by a ratio of well-defined natural numbers, and therefore violate the law of definite proportions. Often, they are solids that contain crystallographic point defects, such as interstitial atoms and vacancies, which result in excess or deficiency of an element, respectively.

As inorganic materials are put to more and more practical uses--mainly in electric, magnetic, and optical devices--materials scientists must have an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the chemical and physical properties of inorganic compounds. This volume--the first of its kind in twenty years--provides a unified presentation of the chemistry of non-stoichiometric compounds based on statistical thermodynamics and structural inorganic chemistry. Four modern examples of non-stoichiometric compounds--ionic conducting compounds, hydrogen absorbing alloys, magnetic materials, and electrical materials--are discussed in detail. Students and researchers in structural inorganic chemistry, crystallography, materials science, and solid state physics will find this much-needed book both practical and informative.