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eBook Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks download

by Larry Evers,Ofelia Zepeda

eBook Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks download ISBN: 0816515220
Author: Larry Evers,Ofelia Zepeda
Publisher: University of Arizona Press (March 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 97
ePub: 1927 kb
Fb2: 1772 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lit lrf mobi docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

An anthology of writings by contemporary Native American authors on the theme of home places, including stories from oral traditions, autobiographical writings, songs, and poems. xi, 97 pages ; 22 cm. Associated-names. Evers, Larry; Zepeda, Ofelia.

An anthology of writings by contemporary Native American authors on the theme of home places, including stories from oral traditions, autobiographical writings, songs, and poems. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Some are stories from oral traditions, others are autobiographical writings, and some are songs or poems. But all are contemporary, and all have as a unifying element a strong central theme in Native American writing: home places. Some of the contributors define the home place as a center of established values, while others speak of its cultural or physical geography. Healing powers are often found at home places.

Some are stories from oral traditions, others are autobiographical writings, and some are songs or poems View. Derived Words in Tohono O'odham.

Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks (1995). Contemporary Authors Online. Retrieved via Biography in Context database, 2016-12-26. Where Clouds Are Formed (2008). Jewed 'i-Hoi, Riding the Earth (2009). a b c Native American Women. p. 343. ^ Brenda Norrell (January 14, 2012). Tucson schools bans books by Chicano and Native American authors". Retrieved January 16, 2012.

Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks more. Publication Date: 1995. Publication Name: World Literature Today.

Ofelia Zepeda (born in Stanfield, Arizona, 1952) is a Tohono O'odham . In 1999, Zepeda received a MacArthur Fellowship.

Ofelia Zepeda (born in Stanfield, Arizona, 1952) is a Tohono O'odham poet and intellectual. She was a student of MIT linguistics professor Ken Hale. She is the Poet Laureate of Tucson, Arizona.

Ofelia Zepeda (born 1952) is an American poet and academic. Home Places: Contemporary native American writing from Sun Tracks. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press (Sun Tracks), 1995. Zepeda, a member of the Tohone O’odham (formerly Papago) Nation, grew up in Stanfield, Arizona.

Returning the Gift: Poetry and Prose from the First North American Native Writers' Festival, (Sun Tracks Books, No 29) University of Arizona Press.

Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks. Ofelia Zepeda's author page on Storytellers: Native American Authors Online. University of Arizona Press.

Larry Evers and Ofelia Zepeda, Home Places: Contemporary Native American Writing from Sun Tracks (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1995). Belden C. Lane, Landscapes of the Sacred: Geography and Narrative in American Spirituality (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001). Thomas A. Tweed, Our Lady of the Exile: Diasporic Religion at a Cuban Catholic Shrine in Miami (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997).

What has nourished native peoples on this continent since time immemorial, say the editors of this volume, are wellsprings of creativity. "Down at the source," Havasupai singer Dan Hanna assures us, "a spring will always be there." The creative wellspring of American Indian culture is well represented in this anthology, a compilation of stories, songs, poems, and other writings taken from twenty-five years of Sun Tracks: An American Literary Series. Editors Larry Evers and Ofelia Zepeda have gathered the contributions of nineteen Native Americans in compiling this collection. Some are stories from oral traditions, others are autobiographical writings, and some are songs or poems. But all are contemporary, and all have as a unifying element a strong central theme in Native American writing: home places. Some of the contributors define the home place as a center of established values, while others speak of its cultural or physical geography. Healing powers are often found at home places. Home is a place to defend against those who would reduce it to insignificance, a place to reclaim, or a place reclaimed but not yet realized. One writer recalls a home that must be pulled from deep beneath the waters of the Columbia River. By listening to these stories of home places, the reader can gain a new appreciation of the contemporary verbal expressions of Native American communities. Home Places, note the editors, "asks you to listen to Native American signers, storytellers, and writers, and in this way to celebrate the wellsprings of creativity that continue to flow from the home places in Native America."