carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » African Religious Influences on Three Black Women Novelists: The Aesthetics of Vodun, Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwartz-bart, and Paule Marshall

eBook African Religious Influences on Three Black Women Novelists: The Aesthetics of Vodun, Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwartz-bart, and Paule Marshall download

by Maria T. Smith

eBook African Religious Influences on Three Black Women Novelists: The Aesthetics of Vodun, Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwartz-bart, and Paule Marshall download ISBN: 0773455280
Author: Maria T. Smith
Publisher: Edwin Mellen Pr (February 28, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1956 kb
Fb2: 1744 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: doc mobi mbr lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

A close reading Zora Neale Hurston s "Their Eyes Were Watching God", Simone Schwarz-Bart s "Pluie et Vent sur Telum?e Miracle", and Paule Marshall s "Praisesong for the Widow", demonstrates the way in which these works allude to the Vodun pantheon and ancestor veneration.

and Paule Marshall Maria T. Smith ; with a foreword by John Lowe.

African religious influences on three Black women novelists : the aesthetics of Vodun : Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwarz-Bart, and Paule Marshall Maria T. book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

The Aesthetics of Vodun (Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwartz-bart, and Paule Marshall). Alert if: New Price below.

Alice Walker, Zora Neale Hurston-A Cautionary Tale and a Partisan View, Foreword, Robert E. Hemenway, Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Biography (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1977) xi–xvii. 7. Hazel V. Carby, The Politics of Fiction, Anthropology, and the Folk: Zora Neale Hurston in New Essays on Their Eyes Were Watching God, ed. Michael Awkward (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990) 71–94Google Scholar. 8. Cornel West, Race Matters (New York: Vintage Books, 1993) 7. oogle Scholar.

Black Women authors, Voodooism in literature, Women novelists. Paule Marshall (1929-), Simone Schwarz-Bart, Zora Neale Hurston.

Would you like to see only ebooks? African Religious Influences on Three Black Women Novelists. Black Women authors, Voodooism in literature, Women novelists.

Tell My Horse is an invaluable resource and fascinating guide. Every Tongue Got to Confess is an extensive volume of African American folklore that Zora Neale Hurston collected on her travels through the Gulf States in the late 1920s. The bittersweet and often hilarious tales - which range from longer narratives about God, the Devil, white folk, and mistaken identity to witty one-liners - reveal attitudes about faith, love, family, slavery, race, and community.

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American author, anthropologist, and filmmaker. The most popular of her four novels is Their Eyes Were Watching God, published in 1937. She also wrote more than 50 short stories, plays, and essays.

Spirit in the Dark is a finely honed compendium of black American writers and the breadth of their religious influences. That black intellectuals and artists were also sometimes dogmatic religious adherents, eclectic spiritualists, and irrepressible agnostics is not an unknown observation, but what these identifications meant for modern black expressive culture has gone mostly unsaid. In this magisterial book, Josef Sorett takes us into those black literary spaces that have heretofore been described as secular and reveals how those who reside therein imagine the beautiful in light of the religious.

African religious influences on three Black women novelists : the aesthetics of Vodun : Zora Neale Hurston, Simone Schwarz-Bart, and Paule Marshall by Maria. 2 Related Publications.

This study, focusing on select novels by women writers of the African Diaspora, illustrates that a surprising degree of commonality exists among works with obvious geographical, cultural, and linguistics differences an affirmation of the philosophical essence of the Vodun religion as an antidote to Western spiritual and cultural moribundity. A close reading Zora Neale Hurston s "Their Eyes Were Watching God", Simone Schwarz-Bart s "Pluie et Vent sur Telum??e Miracle", and Paule Marshall s "Praisesong for the Widow", demonstrates the way in which these works allude to the Vodun pantheon and ancestor veneration in order to valorize a worldview that recognizes the interconnectedness of all living things, visible and invisible. This is accomplished by locating each novel within its socio-political context and developing African diasporic literary tradition wherein African-derived beliefs have become sources of cultural resistance. After this reconstruction, the author is able to explicate the representation and function of Vodun as it is employed by each of the authors under consideration.