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eBook Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading download

by Susan B. Rosenbaum

eBook Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading download ISBN: 0813926106
Author: Susan B. Rosenbaum
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (March 22, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1217 kb
Fb2: 1305 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: docx mobi txt lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism

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Professing Sincerity has some astute things to say about form. She divides the book into three sections of two chapters each that juxtapose an English Romantic poet with a modern American poet. However, for Susan Rosenbaum, the trouble with sincerity does not lie in the demands of "technique," but in the marketplace. Those poets who valued self-expression, she argues, worried that it was compromised by selling their work. She couples Wordsworth with Frank O'Hara, Charlotte Smith with Sylvia Plath, and Anna Laetitia Barbauld with Elizabeth Bishop.

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Rosenbaum, Susan B. (2007). Professing sincerity: modern lyric poetry, commercial culture, and the crisis in reading. University of Virginia Press. ISBN 978-0-8139-2610-0. a b Johnson, Kirk; Ray Troll (2007). Cruisin' the Fossil Freeway: An Epoch Tale of a Scientist and an Artist on the Ultimate 5000-Mile Paleo Road Trip. Golden, Colorado: Fulcrum Publishing.

Author of Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading (University of. .

Author of Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading (University of Virginia Press, 2007). Mark Silverberg is Associate Professor of American Literature at Cape Breton University in Sydney, Nova Scotia. His essays on twentieth century literature and culture have appeared in journals such as English Studies in Canada, Arizona Quarterly, and Contemporary Literature.

Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture and the Crisis in Reading by Susan B. Rosenbaum (pp. 523-526).

Susan Rosenbaum is Associate Professor of English at the University of Georgia. She is the author of Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading, and she is currently writing a book about surrealism, American poetry, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Susan Rosenbaum, author of Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading.

Badia's focus on how anxieties about feminism have shaped views of the Plath reader and the Plath reception more generally is sorely needed. -Susan Rosenbaum, author of Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading. More important overall, Badia leaves us with a sense that both male and female scholars and critics invested in patriarchal culture continue to perform a close reading of women readers in ways that mirror nineteenth-century critical assumptions and worry about those women readers, which should worry all of us.

Professing sincerity. modern lyric poetry, commercial culture, and the crisis in reading. by Susan B. Rosenbaum. Published 2007 by University of Virginia Press in Charlottesville There's no description for this book yet. Published 2007 by University of Virginia Press in Charlottesville. History and criticism, English poetry, Authors and readers, American poetry, Romanticism, Sincerity in literature. 20th century, 19th century, 18th century.

Rosenbaum, Susan . Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading (Charlottesville, V. University of Virginia Press, 2007)

Rosenbaum, Susan . University of Virginia Press, 2007). Sedley, David . Sublimity and Skepticism in Montaigne and Milton (Ann Arbor, Mich. Winn, Colette . (e., Ronsard, figure de la variété: En mémoire d’Isidore Silver (Geneva: Droz, 2002). Woods-Marsden, Joanna, Portrait of the Lady, 1430–1520, in Higman, Susan (e., Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo’s Ginevra de’ Benci and Renaissance Portraits of Women (Princeton University Press, 2001), pp. 63–87. Yandell, Cathy, Carpe Corpus: Time and Gender in Early Modern France (Newark, Del.

Sincerity―the claim that the voice, figure, and experience of a first-person speaker is that of the author―has dominated both the reading and the writing of Anglo-American poetry since the romantic era. Most critical studies have upheld an opposition between sincerity and the literary marketplace, contributing to the widespread understanding of the lyric poem as a moral refuge from the taint of commercial culture. Guided by the question of why we expect poetry to be sincere, Susan Rosenbaum reveals in Professing Sincerity: Modern Lyric Poetry, Commercial Culture, and the Crisis in Reading that, in fact, sincerity in the modern lyric was in many ways a product of commercial culture. As she demonstrates, poets who made a living from their writing both sold the moral promise that their lyrics were sincere and commented on this conflict in their work.

Juxtaposing the poetry of Wordsworth and Frank O’Hara, Charlotte Smith and Sylvia Plath, and Anna Laetitia Barbauld and Elizabeth Bishop, Rosenbaum shows how on the one hand, through textual claims to sincerity poets addressed moral anxieties about the authenticity, autonomy, and transparency of literature written in and for a market. On the other hand, by performing their "private" lives and feelings in public, she argues, poets marketed the self, cultivated celebrity, and advanced professional careers. Not only a moral practice, professing sincerity was also good business. The author focuses on the history of this conflict in both British romantic and American post-1945 poetry.

Professing Sincerity will appeal to students and scholars of Anglo-American lyric poetry, of the history of authorship, and of gender studies and commercial culture.