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by Kathleen Ross,Jesús Díaz

eBook The Initials of the Earth (Latin America in Translation) download ISBN: 0822338297
Author: Kathleen Ross,Jesús Díaz
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (October 10, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 456
ePub: 1336 kb
Fb2: 1482 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf doc txt mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The chronology, the notes, the bibliography and the map help us understand where Jesús Díaz was coming from in 1987 and where he ended u. .

The Initials of the Earth is an emblematic novel of the Cuban Revolution, and the most significant of those set in the Cuba of the 1960s. is the novel that gives voice to the ways in which Cubans-and particularly young rienced years of epic change and crisis. Ambrosio Fornet, from the epilogue. The chronology, the notes, the bibliography and the map help us understand where Jesús Díaz was coming from in 1987 and where he ended u.And the translation, by Kathleen Ross, is splendid: inventive, idiomatic and precise without being pedantic.

Jesús Díaz, Kathleen Ross

Jesús Díaz, Kathleen Ross. Many critics considerThe Initials of the Earthto be the quintessential novel of the Cuban Revolution and the finest work by the Cuban writer and filmmaker Jesuacute;s Diacute;az. Born in Havana in 1941, Diacute;az was a witness to the Revolution and ardent supporter of it until the last decade of his life. In 1992 he took up residence as an exile in Berlin and later in Madrid, where he died in 2002.

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Start by marking The Initials of the Earth (Latin America in Translation) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Initials of the Earth. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Initials of the Earth (Latin America in Translation). by. Ambrosio Fornet, Jesús Díaz.

series Latin America in Translation. Books related to The Initials of the Earth. Many critics consider The Initials of the Earth to be the quintessential novel of the Cuban Revolution and the finest work by the Cuban writer and filmmaker Jesús Díaz. Born in Havana in 1941, Díaz was a witness to the Revolution and ardent supporter of it until the last decade of his life. This is the first of his books to be translated into English.

Latin America in Translation - Selected Essays on Latin American Literature : The Noé Jitrik Reader Tout savoir . Many critics consider The Initials of the Earth to be the quintessential novel of the Cuban Revolution and the finest work by the Cuban writer and filmmaker Jesús Díaz

Latin America in Translation - Selected Essays on Latin American Literature : The Noé Jitrik Reader Tout savoir sur Latin America in Translation. Susan E. Benner (Traduction), Noe Jitrik (Auteur).

Díaz, Jesús; Ross, Kathleen. Modern fiction, Latin America - General, Fiction, Fiction - Historical, Political, Historical - General, JEWISH STUDIES, Literary Studies/Latin America, Literary, Cuba, History, Revolution, 1959. Durham : Duke University Press.

The Initials Of The Earth (Latin America In Translation). The Initials Of The Earth - ISBNdb (books and publications). Kathleen Ross graduated from The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale with a bachelor's degree in Graphic Design. author: Kathleen Ross.

Latin America–United States relations. Latin America–United States relations are relations between the United States of America and the countries of Latin America. Historically speaking, bilateral relations between the United States and the various countries of Latin America have been multifaceted and complex, at times defined by strong regional cooperation and at others filled with economic and political tension and rivalry. Although relations between the .

Discussion among translators, entitled: Spanish variants - Latin America. welcome to forum and congratulations for this topic! These linguistic subtleties are raising the "translation bar" too high, but. that's the way we like it, don't we? Kind regards, tagore. Forum name: Translation Theory and Practice. Alex Lago Испания Local time: 10:52 Член ProZ Context/syntaxis.

Bureaucratic authoritarianism. Latin America at the end of the 20th century

Bureaucratic authoritarianism. Latin America at the end of the 20th century. Even in Díaz’s Mexico the constitution was not entirely meaningless, while civilian governments commonly used some combination of electoral manipulation and restricted suffrage to keep control in the hands of a small minority of political leaders allied with landed and commercial elites. Neither dictatorial nor oligarchic regimes gave due representation to the majority of inhabitants.

Many critics consider The Initials of the Earth to be the quintessential novel of the Cuban Revolution and the finest work by the Cuban writer and filmmaker Jesús Díaz. Born in Havana in 1941, Díaz was a witness to the Revolution and ardent supporter of it until the last decade of his life. In 1992 he took up residence as an exile in Berlin and later in Madrid, where he died in 2002. This is the first of his books to be translated into English.

Originally written in the 1970s, then rewritten and published simultaneously in Havana and Madrid in 1987, The Initials of the Earth spans the tumultuous years from the 1950s until the 1970s, encompassing the Revolution and its immediate aftermath. The novel opens as the protagonist, Carlos Pérez Cifredo, sits down to fill out a questionnaire for readmission to the Cuban Communist Party. It closes with Carlos standing before a panel of Party members charged with assessing his merit as an “exemplary worker.” The chapters between relate Carlos’s experiences of the pre- and postrevolutionary era. His family is torn apart as some members reject the Revolution and flee the country while others, including Carlos, choose to stay. He witnesses key events including the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Cuban missile crisis, and the economically disastrous sugar harvest of 1970. Throughout the novel, Díaz vividly renders Cuban culture through humor, slogans, and slang; Afro-Cuban religion; and references to popular music, movies, and comics.

This edition of The Initials of the Earth includes a bibliography and filmography of Diaz’s works and a timeline of the major events of the Cuban revolutionary period. In his epilogue, the Cuban writer Ambrosio Fornet reflects on Díaz’s surprising 1992 renunciation of the Revolution, their decades-long friendship, and the novel’s reception, structure, and place within Cuban literary history.

Comments: (2)
Jediathain
I've waited too long to review this book, so my feelings on the particulars aren't fresh, but I can say for sure from the time that's passed that reading this book permanently changed my intellectual relationship with Cuba. Before, I appreciated Cuban music and culture, but in Diaz's narrative style I found a backdoor into the Cuban consciousness so in brief moments I understood the emotional birth of the dancing and music, and even of the Revolution.

At times his narration style abruptly changed. After a hundred pages the main character enlisted in the military and the prose straightened out, no longer fractured or colorful. For a young reader who admittedly reads Joyce and Faulkner more for the thrill of it than to become vulnerable to the story, this stylistic change almost made me start skimming. But then, just as abruptly, the story jumped forward a couple years and the fractured narrative style returned. I realized then and during other changes, and the broadening at the novel's end, that the third person voice emanates from the main character's experience, not from an objective source. Diaz achieved this style so perfectly that for the longest time I didn't notice.

Ross (the translator) believes that some Spanish phrases in the novel, especially all the puns, aren't translatable, so I had to flip back to the glossary a lot while reading. This was well worth it. I was conscious of the cultural mannerisms I was missing and put more effort into bridging those mental gaps between my language and that of the characters and author.

I don't think I can here produce a succinct argument for why this novel is, say, the prime novel of the Revolution, or Diaz's true contributions to the world of Latin American literature. But I do know that it was a challenging (and yet not beleaguering) read with lasting affects on my cultural conciencia. I read the novel to make a presentation for a class in Latin American history, and I strongly recommended it be included in the future as the novel paired with historical readings on the Revolution.
GYBYXOH
I bought this novel for a class. I got it used and the quality was perfectly fine for me.