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eBook Dreams of My Russian Summers download

by Geoffrey Howard,Andrei Makine

eBook Dreams of My Russian Summers download ISBN: 0736644377
Author: Geoffrey Howard,Andrei Makine
Publisher: Books on Tape; Unabridged edition (October 1, 1999)
Language: English
ePub: 1934 kb
Fb2: 1803 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi docx lrf doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Dreams of My Russian Summers (French: Le Testament français) is a French novel by Andrei Makine, originally published in 1995. It won two top French awards, the Prix Goncourt and the Prix Médicis.

Dreams of My Russian Summers (French: Le Testament français) is a French novel by Andrei Makine, originally published in 1995. The novel is told from the first-person perspective and tells the fictional story of a boy's memories and experiences with his French grandmother in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and '70s.

Translated from the french by. Geoffrey Strachan

Translated from the french by. Geoffrey Strachan. Arcade publishing, new york. Andreï Makine was born and brought up in Russia but wrote Dreams of My Russian Summers in French, living in France.

TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY Geoffrey Strachan.

Andrei Makine Dreams Of My Russian Summers Andrei Makine Dreams Of My Russian Summers TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY Geoffrey Strachan For Marianne Véron and Herbert Lottman For Laura and Thierry de Montalembert For Jean- Christoph. t was with a childish pleasure and a profound emotion that, being unable to mention the names of so many others who must have acted similarly and thanks to whom. TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY Geoffrey Strachan. For Marianne Véron and Herbert Lottman.

Andrei Makine's book, Dreams of My Russian Summer's, is a very special book. Geoffrey Strachan manages to dig up the meaning of many terms and expressions that I was unaware of, yet when it comes time to string them all together into paragraphs, doesn't do such a great job. Even though the author wrote the book in French, and I read it in translation (English), the writing is fantastic. The tone of the resulting prose (in English) swings between whimsical, tragic, clinical, dry, ironic, et. in a way that the original French doesn't.

Makine introduces us to a French-Russian boy in this great coming of age story in which the young boy, our .

Makine introduces us to a French-Russian boy in this great coming of age story in which the young boy, our narrator, tries to come to grips with his cultural identity through stories, papers, and historical artifacts found in his grandmother's trunk, his observations and experiences. He finds himself shifting identities constantly. I can only imagine how much more luscious and gorgeous it Dreams of My Russian Summers is my second book by Russian-born French novelist, Andrei Makine, and I was once again entranced by the elegance of his lyrical prose. Makine was born and raised in Russia but he wrote this book in French while he was living in France.

Похожие книги на Dreams Of My Russian Summers. But the lyricism of the writing, some memorable images, and the way the story implicates the tragedy of 20th Century Russia earn the book a qualified recommendation

Похожие книги на Dreams Of My Russian Summers. But the lyricism of the writing, some memorable images, and the way the story implicates the tragedy of 20th Century Russia earn the book a qualified recommendation. На нашем сайте вы можете скачать книгу "Dreams Of My Russian Summers" Andrei Makine бесплатно и без регистрации в формате epub, fb2, читать книгу онлайн или купить книгу в интернет-магазине.

Dreams of my Russian summers. Andreï Makine was born in Siberia in 1957. He was granted political asylum in Paris, France, in 1987, where he continues to live. Библиографические данные. The first of Makine's four novels to appear in English, this autobiographical novel won the 1995 Prix Medicis for Best Foreign Fiction as well as France's prestigious Prix Goncourt, never before.

Not at all. She could very well have lived here, close to yo. .I almost leaped from my stool beside the television rovincial town

Not at all.I almost leaped from my stool beside the television rovincial town. It would have been so easy to explain her choice to the adults gathered in our kitchen. I would have talked of the dry air of the steppe, whose silent transparency distilled the past. I would have spoken of the dusty streets that led nowhere, as they emerged, all of them, onto the small endless plain. For Laura and Thierry de Montalembert. For Jean- Christophe. it was with a childish pleasure and a profound emotion that, being unable to mention the names of so many others who must have acted similarly and thanks to whom France has survived, I gave the real names her. Marcel Proust, Le Temps retrouvé. Does the Siberian ask heaven for olive trees, or the Provençal for cranberries? – Joseph de Maistre, Les Soirées de St. Petersbourg

Relates the experiences of a boy growing up in the Soviet Union of the 1960s and 1970s, whose visits to his French grandmother each summer bring new tales of a Russia he never knew.
Comments: (7)
Wizer
71 of 75 for 2015. The reading guide for this novel compares it to work by Nabokov and other great Russian authors, although I can't really see that. The book, written originally in French and presented here as an English translation, tells the story of a young man growing up in Soviet era Russia, spending his summers with his grandmother, a native of Paris. As someone who grew up in all the tension of the Cold War, I am fascinated by stories that tell of the life of my counterparts on the other side of the Iron Curtain. Essentially a Bildungsroman, the story of Andrei and his grandmother's history, the novel takes us through many years of growth, including the period when his "difference," that French background he has from his grandmother, stands in the way of his acceptance as a good soviet youth. The book has four separate, but interrelated time lines: the narrator's summers with Charlotte, his grandmother; the narrator's school years when he lives with his parents, then his aunt after his parents' deaths; Charlotte's youth in early 20th Century Paris; and the narrator's life after he leaves Russia for the West, primarily set in Paris. The first three weave their strands through most of the book. The fourth is presented almost as an addendum: and then I grew up. This is not one of my "light and frivolous" reads. Lots of detail here, and for me at least, a slow read, but worthwhile.
Insanity
This was not a book I looked forward to reading every night. I found the ideas and themes repetitive and just wished he would get on with his life. The descriptions of war and the Russian steppes are incredibly well written, frightening even in their detail, but the constant harping on his trying to subsume his french elements into his Russian life just wore me out. In addition, the kindle edition was not well edited. Half way through the book Sarazac became Saranac and then toward the end changed back again, plus there was a scattering of ? as if the translator had not been sure if he was employing the correct word and left in the question mark. I'm not running around telling all my friends this is a 'must read.'
Samugul
In interviews, Andrei Makine apparently does not comment on how closely "Dreams" adheres to his own childhood, but he did have a French grandmother whose stories pervaded his childhood in a Russian small town. She evidently had the amazing ability to immerse her grandson in characters and entire scenes of belle-époque Paris so deeply that, in adult life, he successfully impersonated a native French author to write this prize-winning book and others. Those experiences, and their influence on his later life and thought, form the core of the book, around which other, likely fictional or composite characters and events are arrayed. Thus, purely as a novel the book may seem a bit disjointed, but if you agree that a writer should depict such an extraordinary experience faithfully as is practical, that shouldn't matter.
thrust
Andrei Makine's book, Dreams of My Russian Summer's, is a very special book. Even though the author wrote the book in French, and I read it in translation (English), the writing is fantastic. It takes a little getting used to it, it's very "flowery", just to give you fair warning, but once you get used to it, you'll appreciate it. And despite all the attention given to the language, quite a bit actually happens, the dialogue doesn't stand still. It's a moving and interesting story.

The story is told in retrospect in the first person. It's a memory. We are told that he has a grandmother who has both French and Russian backgrounds, born and raised in France and married a Russian and lived out the rest of her life there, making her way through world wars and quirky Russian society. What we're not told immediately is why the narrator is fixated on his grandmother's dual nationality, which is what the novel is about.

Take time to enjoy the language and to fully appreciate the details of the story. I immediately reread the first 20 pages upon finishing, just to make sure I didn't miss anything important. This 1995 book will definitely be read and reread for a long time.
Whiteseeker
Although I am not Russian or French, somehow these words speak to a deep nostalgia in me. The foreign country of our elders is unknowable.
Bloodhammer
I had been going through a slew of memoirs when I picked this one up: it was different. The first thing I noticed, about 50 pages in, was that one has to read this book slowly and carefully, paying strict attention. It's a literary memoir, not a casual read. Makine's style here is elliptical and oblique, meaning that if you go to fast there's a lot that you'll miss.

I think I know the novel well now. I have read it twice and also read it twice in French. I see it as a challenging book that has repaid my effort.

One thing that's a bit depressing is that this translation into English, I feel, was done by somebody who was better at French than at writing English. Geoffrey Strachan manages to dig up the meaning of many terms and expressions that I was unaware of, yet when it comes time to string them all together into paragraphs, doesn't do such a great job. The tone of the resulting prose (in English) swings between whimsical, tragic, clinical, dry, ironic, etc., in a way that the original French doesn't. In other words, Makine's original has a consistency of tone -- a sort of stunned, dreamy tone -- that is lost in translation, appearing in Strachan's job only in fits and starts.

I say "novel," because it is. Makine makes like he's writing the story of his grandmother, but he admitted in later interviews that he didn't even have a French-Russian grandmother (!), and that this was pretty much made up. Thus I say novel.
Zicelik
Facinating book I reallly enjoyed...An interesting book about a period in Russia that we usuallydo not think about very much. Interesting insight into indiduals and the Great Patriotic War, WW II.. Worth reading...