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eBook Plains of Promise (UQP Black Australian Writers) download

by Alexis Wright

eBook Plains of Promise (UQP Black Australian Writers) download ISBN: 0702229172
Author: Alexis Wright
Publisher: University of Queensland Press (March 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1831 kb
Fb2: 1125 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt doc mbr docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

In this brilliant debut novel, Alexis Wright evokes city and outback, deepening our understanding of human ambition and failure, and making the timeless heart and soul of this country pulsate on the page.

In this brilliant debut novel, Alexis Wright evokes city and outback, deepening our understanding of human ambition and failure, and making the timeless heart and soul of this country pulsate on the page. Black and white cultures collide in a thousand ways as Aboriginal spirituality clashes with the complex brutality of colonisation at St Dominic's mission. With her political awareness raised by work with the city-based Aboriginal Coalition, Mary visits the old mission in the northern Gulf country, place of her mother's and grand-mother's suffering.

com's Alexis Wright Author Page. Plains of Promise (UQP Black Australian Writers).

Alexis Wright's first book Plains of Promise published in 1997 was nominated for several literary awards and has .

Alexis Wright's first book Plains of Promise published in 1997 was nominated for several literary awards and has been reprinted several times by University of Queensland Press. Wright has also published two non-fiction works - Take Power, an anthology on the history of the land rights movement in 1998, and Grog War (Magabala Books) on the introduction of alcohol restrictions in Tennant Creek and published in 1997.

Alexis Wright's Plains of Promise was a hard read This is the third book by Alexis Wright I've read in the past 12 months .

Alexis Wright's Plains of Promise was a hard read. The subject matter is very dark and sad, illuminated by the stark brutality that Wright invokes. The writing style does not make for an easy, flowing read and I did find it hard going at first. This is the third book by Alexis Wright I've read in the past 12 months, including The Swan Book and Carpenteria. Her writing style is beautiful and fluid, each book delving into dark eras in our black history through the guise of dreamtime narrative. Alexis has published award-winning short stories a Alexis Wright is from the Waanji people from the highlands of the southern Gulf of Carpentaria.

ALEXIS WRIGHT is an activist and writer from the Waanyi nation of the Gulf of Carpentaria. Her debut novel, Plains of Promise (UQP Black Australian Writers), was published in 1997 and was nominated for several major literary awards, including the Commonwealth Prize. Her second novel, Carpentaria (Giramondo Publishing, 2006), won the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal, the Miles Franklin Literary Award in 2007, the 2007 Fiction Book Award in the Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards, and the Victorian Premier’s Prize for Fiction. Her latest novel, Praiseworthy, will be published in 2017.

Wright, 56, the author of a previous novel, Plains of Promise, has also taken several other prizes for Carpentaria, including the Australian .

Wright, 56, the author of a previous novel, Plains of Promise, has also taken several other prizes for Carpentaria, including the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal. The book does not yet have an American publisher. White Australian writers have long tried to tackle Aboriginal subjects, starting with Xavier Herbert and his Capricornia (1938), a sweeping social protest novel that described the subjugation of Aborigines at the hands of white settlers. Wright said she chose the title Carpentaria as a celebration of the ancestral lands that her mother and grandmother, members of the Waanyi nation, were forced from, and not as a nod to Xavier.

Alexis Wright (born 25 November 1950) is an Aboriginal Australian writer best known for winning the Miles Franklin Award for her 2006 novel Carpentaria and the 2018 Stella Prize for her "collective memoir" of Leigh Bruce "Tracker".

Alexis Wright (born 25 November 1950) is an Aboriginal Australian writer best known for winning the Miles Franklin Award for her 2006 novel Carpentaria and the 2018 Stella Prize for her "collective memoir" of Leigh Bruce "Tracker" Tilmouth. Alexis Wright is a land rights activist originally from the Waanyi people in the highlands of the southern Gulf of Carpentaria

Alexis Wright (born 25 November 1950) is an Indigenous Australian writer best known for winning the Miles Franklin Award for her 2006 novel "Carpentaria".

Alexis Wright (born 25 November 1950) is an Indigenous Australian writer best known for winning the Miles Franklin Award for her 2006 novel "Carpentaria". Wright's father, a white cattleman, died when she was five years old and she grew up in Cloncurry, Queensland with her mother and grandmother.

Alexis Wright is an Indigenous Australian writer best known for winning the Miles Franklin Award for her 2006 novel Carpentaria. Posts About Alexis Wright.

In this brilliant debut novel, Alexis Wright evokes city and outback, deepening our understanding of human ambition and failure, and making the timeless heart and soul of this country pulsate on the page. Black and white cultures collide in a thousand ways as Aboriginal spirituality clashes with the complex brutality of colonisation at St Dominic's mission. With her political awareness raised by work with the city-based Aboriginal Coalition, Mary visits the old mission in the northern Gulf country, place of her mother's and grand-mother's suffering. Mary's return re-ignites community anxieties, and the Council of Elders again turn to their spirit world.
Comments: (2)
Nuadazius
"These two benefitted from their mother's nurturing. They were Gloria's precious jewels, all she had left from her dream of freedom. In secret she taught her children the joy of love. She gave them the gift of hope."

'Plains of Promise' is heart-wrenching novel published in 1997 by the Australian author Alexis Wright. It is so harrowing that about half way through I left off reading it for a few months because it was really too much for me to take. But I've gone ahead and finished it now and I'm glad I did. In delcious imagery, Wright is able to evoke to the sounds, smells and textures of the Outback and the Dreaming. The writing is sheer beauty and evocation, like reading poetry. But the subject matter is an Aboriginal mission station around the middle of the 20th century, and the depravity and horror of it is just sickening. It was truly a grand attempt, sustained for a good century or so, to murder the culture and heritage of an entire nation of people through forced internment in prison camps. In no other novel have I wanted to reach into the pages so often and intervene in the unfolding catastrophes.

The first half focuses on the story of Ivy Koopundri, an abused child at the St Dominics mission station deep in the outback of the Northern Territory. The second half fast forwards to Melbourne around 1990, where Ivy's daughter Mary has a successful career as a computer programmer. Mary had been taken from her mother at birth and adopted to white parents. She eventually sets off on a perilous journey to try and find out who she really is. Although I was engrossed in finding out what would happen, the second half of the novel seemed quite rushed, often like a summary of events. Although it was not as full of turmoil, the beauty of the prose did dry up somewhat.

Although I have studied the history of the mission stations, reading 'Plains of Promise' makes me want to know more about the human stories behind this multi-generational crime against humanity that scars our Australian consciousness. I do not know Ivy Koopundri as well as I know Dorothea Casaubon or Stepan Verkhovensky, but I would like to. I recommend this book to anyone with a passion for understanding indigenous experiences, but I can only warn you that (especially if you have daughters) it can demand a very strong stomach. In closing, I will type out Wright's wonderful description of Madame Sadaan, a volunteer at the mental health institute who teaches the ladies belly dancing as a way to overcome their fears:

"All year round she covered herself with flowering gowns, caftans and ponchos in vivid patterns. An eye-catching behind so broad its wobbling was mesmerising to anyone walking behind. She was perfectly aware of this as she passed along the narrow corridors. Wobble, wobble, wobble, almost bumping into the walls each side. What male could resist the temptation? It would take a very dull man not to feel an irresistable temptation fer her. To watch her dance was a feast. A phenomenon. And always wobbling. If she had been the size of an elephant she would have caused earthquakes. As it was, maintanence men had to nail down the floorboards after each performance."

I am so glad that I'm not dull.
Phain
A highly suggestive book that makes one dream of Australia and the plains of the Northern Territory, that makes the reader participate to the highly emotional experiences of the characters and that makes us question our conscience about how it could possibly happen something like that.
Plains of promise is the second book from the emergent Aboriginal writer Alexis Wright; highly praised by all critics when published, it was paralleled to the Hispano-American magic realism. Alexis Wright's book explores the past and present Aboriginal situation through a matrilineage , the history of mothers and daughters who take us across the second half of the past century. This saga uncovers the Aboriginal myths and legends but more truly their reality which is alive and still part of their every day life. So, it is not magic-realism what we find in the book, but an intricate symbolism that will lead us to the discovery of a different reality, that will allow us to take a glimpse to their world but that will not give us the key to fully understand it.
An intense book that will leave as many questions open as wounds bleeding. A lot of suffering but also a good charge of hope for the future generations; and it is for them that it hopes to trace a way towards reconciliation with the past and, by giving them back their origins, to provide them with a new and more stable identity.
Surely a masterpiece of Australian literature.