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by Philippa Gregory

eBook The Other Queen: A Novel (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels) download ISBN: 1416549129
Author: Philippa Gregory
Publisher: Touchstone; 1 edition (September 16, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 448
ePub: 1531 kb
Fb2: 1655 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lrf azw txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels. Internationally bestselling author Philippa Gregory brings this extraordinary family drama to vivid life through its women – beginning with Elizabeth Woodville, the White Queen.

The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels. The Lady of the Rivers. Descended from Melusina, the river goddess, Jacquetta has always had the gift of second sight. As a child visiting her uncle, she meets his prisoner, Joan of Arc, and sees her own power reflected in the young woman accused of witchcraft, before Joan is taken to a horrific death at the hands of the English rulers of France.

Philippa Gregory's 'Cousins' War' and 'Tudor Court' series have been re-listed as 'The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels' as of August 2016. Philippa Gregory's 'Cousins' War' and 'Tudor Court' series have been re-listed as 'The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels' as of August 2016.

The book is about Mary Queen of Scots exile and imprisonment from the throne. Written in three voices - Mary, Shrewsbury, and his wife Bess, the latter tasked with housing her. I had just finished the 5th book in this Tudor series and Cecil was the redeeming character

The book is about Mary Queen of Scots exile and imprisonment from the throne. I had just finished the 5th book in this Tudor series and Cecil was the redeeming character. Therefore it was incredibly difficult to slam on the brakes and read of a nasty, scheming Cecil ten years later. I was thoroughly disgusted with Bess, whose "I am an independent woman" shtick grated on my last nerve.

Three Sisters, Three Queens. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Other Boleyn Girl. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Boleyn Inheritance. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Taming of the Queen. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Queen's Fool. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Virgin's Lover. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Last Tudor. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels The Other Queen. The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels Reading now. The Demigod Diaries.

The Other Queen (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

The Other Queen (The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels Year Published: 2008. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Philippa Gregory (born 9 January 1954) is an English historical novelist who has been publishing since 1987. The best known of her works is The Other Boleyn Girl (2001), which in 2002 won the Romantic Novel of the Year Award from the Romantic Novelists' Association and has been adapted into two separate films. AudioFile magazine has called Gregory "the queen of British historical fiction".

Слушайте The Other Queen (автор: Philippa Gregory, Richard Armitage, Alex Kingston, Madeleine Leslay) . The arrival of an extravagant queen turns the household upside down, as it becomes clear that the visit is a house arrest

Слушайте The Other Queen (автор: Philippa Gregory, Richard Armitage, Alex Kingston, Madeleine Leslay) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. The arrival of an extravagant queen turns the household upside down, as it becomes clear that the visit is a house arrest. Queen Mary makes Bess’ hard-won house a centre for unrest and treason, and - perhaps worst of all - Mary Queen of Scots’ fabled beauty starts to work on the Tudor loyalist, Bess’ own husband, George.

Philippa Gregory is the author of many New York Times bestselling novels, including The Other Boleyn Girl, and is a. .Her most recent novel, The Last Tudor, is now in production for a television series

Philippa Gregory is the author of many New York Times bestselling novels, including The Other Boleyn Girl, and is a recognized authority on women’s history. Many of her works have been adapted for the screen including The Other Boleyn Girl. Her most recent novel, The Last Tudor, is now in production for a television series. She graduated from the University of Sussex and received a PhD from the University of Edinburgh, where she is a Regent. She holds honorary degrees from Teesside University and the University of Sussex.

greenstreetbooks has no other items for sale. Three Sisters, Three Queens by Philippa Gregory AUDIO BOOK on CD Unabridged. Details about The Other Queen: A Novel: The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, book 15 [Plantagenet. The Other Queen: A Novel: The Plantagenet and Tudor Novels, book 15 [Plantagenet. 39 rub. P&p: + 2,331. NEW - The Other Queen by Gregory, Philippa. 88. 5 rub. P&p: + 30. 3 rub p&p.

I love to read these books. I am familiar with the Red/White & of course the Tudor history, before I read the books

The Other Queen – It chronicles the long imprisonment in England of Mary, Queen of Scots. I love to read these books. I am familiar with the Red/White & of course the Tudor history, before I read the books. But I was surprised by the events of the Three Sisters, Three Queens.

From #1 New York Times bestselling author and “queen of royal fiction” (USA TODAY) Philippa Gregory—a dazzling new novel about the intriguing, romantic, and maddening Mary, Queen of Scots.Fleeing violent rebellions in Scotland, Mary looks to Queen Elizabeth of England for sanctuary. Though promised protection, Mary, perceived as a serious threat to the English crown, is soon imprisoned by her former friend as a “guest” in the house of George Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, and his indomitable wife, Bess of Hardwick. The newly married couple welcomes the condemned queen into their home, certain that serving as her hosts and jailers will bring them an advantage in the cutthroat world of the Elizabethan court. To their horror, they grow to realize that the task will bankrupt their estate and lose them what little favor they’ve managed to gain as their home becomes the epicenter of intrigue and rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. And Mary is not as hopeless as she appears, manipulating the earl and spinning her own web of treachery and deceit, as she sharpens her weapons to reclaim her Scottish throne—and to take over Queen Elizabeth’s of England.
Comments: (7)
Ce
I only paid $2.99 for this book (check out bookbub!), but I paid too much. I truly enjoy most of PG's novels, but take them with a grain of salt. I always read a reliable source (such as Alison Weir) if I really want to read what is actually known about a given monarch. PG does so well bringing facts alive, but takes liberties everywhere. Regarding this novel: it is the same material, repeated (using some of the same words and phrases), over and over and over again. Some reviewers have mentioned this, but truly, it would be laughable if it weren't so frustrating. MQS is a fascinating woman; so much more could have been done with her character. Additionally, Bess is the reason I gave this book two stars rather than one--she's intriguing. Unfortunately, the fascination ends after the 4th and 5th repetitions of the same exact thoughts and actions. Margaret George wrote 870 pages about MQS, and I found the novel compelling. PG phoned in this one.
*Full disclosure: I could not go past the halfway point.*
Beranyle
I love historical fiction and I usually love Phillipa Gregory's books. But this one didn't quite do it for me. Mary Queen of Scots is an interesting character who led a fascinating life but in this book the best parts are all behind her--France and her marriage to the king, Scotland and her husband and lover. Here she is merely a pawn in everyone's power game. The book is an elaborate chess game where one queen is moved from place to place while the opposing queen tries to decide what to do with her. As well written as it is, it isn't the best of this series.
Akinonris
I've recently become interested in learning about Mary, Queen of Scots; this gives an interesting take on the period of her life that seems to be the least talked about, when Mary seeks protection in England and in exchange Queen Elizabeth causes her to become restrained in an English earl's home to make her comfortable, but not technically free. Other depictions I've seen of Mary make her more likable; Gregory portrays her as quite shallow and selfish, yet still fun to read about. The switching up of narrators throughout this book makes it easy for the reader to see how Mary impacted people around her - George, her genteel imprisoner the earl who has been given the contradictory instructions by Queen Elizabeth to treat Mary with respect as a queen deserves but also monitor her to make sure she is not plotting to steal the English throne, finds Mary to be the most irresistible woman despite his undying loyalty to his wife and his queen. George's wife Bess is jealous of Mary for the bewitching effect her beauty has on men and bitter at all the money and assets housing Mary costs her, but she even admits to the reader it is impossible not to warm to Mary. My only criticism of the book is there's so much anticipation as to what will happen between Mary and her "frenemy" Elizabeth and then all of a sudden, it's several years later and there's a quick description of the circumstances of Mary's death, from Bess after she has received the news. I would have liked Mary's first person point of view leading up to her death, so I found the end to be abrupt and lackluster. But up until that point I couldn't put the book down.
Heraly
This book took me a little longer than usual to read, not because of the quality of the writing, but because this was a part of Tudor history I didn't know much about and I found myself constantly looking up the characters and places Gregory mentioned in the book.

I think writing this book from 3 different first person perspectives gave an interesting view of the time period. Three different people have three very different views of the same event. I found myself constantly thrown for a loop by Mary. She never thought twice about lying and it was interesting to see how she would portray an event to others, and then how she actually thought of the same event.

Bess is one of the best historical fiction characters I've read in a long time. From Gregory's book, as well as the researching I did on my own, I've come to really love her strength and determination. She was a smart business woman and used that to her advantage. She worked her way up and earned the things she had, even if it was through marriage, and worked hard to keep herself safe and secure for the future. I think more women in books should be like her.

Yet again, Gregory has me thinking about the little things in history and how one simple decision can change the fate of a country, and the world. While not my favorite book (The Queen's Fool has that title), it was a great read and sheds more light onto the Tudor era of history.
Cordann
For me, Gregory is hit or miss, and this was mostly a miss.

The book is about Mary Queen of Scots exile and imprisonment from the throne. Written in three voices -- Mary, Shrewsbury, and his wife Bess, the latter tasked with housing her.

I had just finished the 5th book in this Tudor series and Cecil was the redeeming character. Therefore it was incredibly difficult to slam on the brakes and read of a nasty, scheming Cecil ten years later.

I was thoroughly disgusted with Bess, whose "I am an independent woman" shtick grated on my last nerve. Queen Mary is just delusional, and Shrewsbury loses pretty much all regard by the end, and I felt sorry for him.

I was deeply disappointed by the ending. Anyone with history behind them knows the Scots queen was beheaded, yet for some inexplicable reason, Gregory chose to cover the entire POINT of the book in a dream sequence of Shrewsbury and the loathsome gloating of Bess. After committing myself to a long, drawn out account of the Queen avoiding The Tower, why didn't the author at the minimum give Mary a final voice?

Not the best. I feel like I wasted my time and bought a different book about this instead.