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by Der Nister "The Hidden One"

eBook The Family Mashber download ISBN: 0006542425
Author: Der Nister "The Hidden One"
Publisher: Flamingo; New Ed edition (1979)
Pages: 672
ePub: 1194 kb
Fb2: 1267 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt mbr doc lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

His pseudonym, which translates as 'The Hidden One', is as puzzling as his diverse body of works, which . Der Nister (Pinkhes Kahanovitsh, 1884-1950) is widely regarded as the most enigmatic author in modern Yiddish literature.

His pseudonym, which translates as 'The Hidden One', is as puzzling as his diverse body of works, which range from mystical symbolist poetry and dark expressionist tales to realist historical epic. Although part of the Kiev Group of Yiddish writers, which also included David Bergelson and Peretz Markish, Der Nister remained at the margins of the Yiddish literary world throughout his life, mainstream success eluding him both in- and outside the Soviet Union.

DER NISTER ('. The Hidden One')

DER NISTER ('. The Hidden One'). Translated from the Yiddish by Leonard Wolf. The Family Mashber, a lost masterpiece written in Yiddish by Der Nister, a Soviet writer who died in a Russian prison hospital in 1950, has begun slowly to emerge from the obscurity into which it was cast when its author, along with scores of other Yiddish-writing contemporaries in the Soviet Union, fell victim to Stalin's paranoia. This unfinished novel, of which volumes 1 and 2 were published in 1939 and in 1948, has refused to disappear.

Der Nister (Yiddish: דער נסתּר ֹor דער ניסטער‎, "the Hidden One"; 1 November 1884 – 4 June 1950 in a Soviet Gulag) was the pseudonym of Pinchus Kahanovich (Yiddish: פּנחס קאַהאַנאָוויטש‎), a Yiddish author, philosopher, translator, and crit.

Der Nister (Yiddish: דער נסתּר ֹor דער ניסטער‎, "the Hidden One"; 1 November 1884 – 4 June 1950 in a Soviet Gulag) was the pseudonym of Pinchus Kahanovich (Yiddish: פּנחס קאַהאַנאָוויטש‎), a Yiddish author, philosopher, translator, and critic. Kahanovich was born in Berdychiv, Ukraine, the third in a family of four children with ties to the Korshev sect of Hasidic Judaism. His father was Menakhem Mendl Kahanovich, a smoked-fish merchant at Astrakhan on the Volga River; his mother's name was Leah

The Family Mashber is a protean work: a tale of a divided family and divided souls, a panoramic picture of an. .

The Family Mashber is a protean work: a tale of a divided family and divided souls, a panoramic picture of an Eastern European town, a social satire, a kabbalistic allegory, an innovative fusion of modernist art and traditional storytelling, a tale of weird humor and mounting tragic power, embellished with a host of uncanny and fantastical figures drawn from daily life and the. depths of the unconscious. About the Author: Der Nister (1884–1950) was the pen name used by Pinhas Kahanovitch, a Yiddish writer, philosopher, translator, critic, and key figure in modernist literature in Kiev in the 1920s.

The novel follows the Mashber family in their Polish-Ukrainian town of N, and how, over the course of one year . Der Nister’s magnum opus brims with life.

The novel follows the Mashber family in their Polish-Ukrainian town of N, and how, over the course of one year in the 1870s, they see their comfort and happiness and financial prosperity evaporate. The Mashbers of note are three brothers: Luzi, a mystic and spiritual seeker; Alter, a pious epileptic; and Moshe, around whom the novel largely revolves-the savvy businessman whose wealth is an indelible cornerstone for the entire community. Now, 79 years since the first volume was published in Moscow, and 31 since its first English translation, The Family Mashber’s momentous gravity and worth still resonates.

The Family Mashber book. Kahanovich adopted Der Nister as his pen-name early in his career, a calque of Yiddish and Hebrew that translates as "the Hidden On. Mashber means "crisis" in Hebrew, and in Kahanovich's novel it is the name of a well-to-do family in "N," a provincial Ukrainian town (probably modeled after his native Berdichev) circa 1870. The novel begins with the family's business affairs at their best but then takes a nasty turn until Moshe Mashber, the pater familias, is bankrupted and thrown into prison.

First time in Paperback The Family Mashber is a protean work: a tale of a divided family and divided souls . Reading this massive novel is the closest anyone can come today to living in that world.

And the author’s name, Der Nister (The Hidden One) - what was that about? As I rescued the book from my daughter’s determined hands, a letter fell out. It was a personal note from the English translator, Leonard Wolf. It was a personal note from the English translator, Leonard Wolf, asking the esteemed professor, Dear Yosef, to read this formidable book. sheer length and Dostoevskyan mood and manner require careful, patient and sensitive reader. I wouldn’t say that I couldn’t put the book down - it’s a heavy book - you can’t just carry it around all day, but it’s certainly a page-turner, an extraordinarily rich saga replete with details about a Jewish world in flux and crisis (Mashber, in fact, means crisis in Hebrew).

Reading this massive novel is the closest anyone can come today to living in that world.

Comments: (5)
Skunk Black
This is the book of the heroic genius. Manipulating imaginative words have been an ancient Jewish craft and Der Nister is the grand master of them all. He created an 'epos' of the unexpected and unforgettable characters.There is nothing, with the exception of Chaim Grade perhaps, that is so significant in understanding of the Jewish history of the past 100 years.

This book is not for everybody. You need to have a keen feel for the Jewish milieu, to recognize the symbols, the references and the strife. You need to have determination and curiosity to tackle the vast volume.

This book combines Dostoevsky tradition of the psychological, philosophic narrative (The Bothers Mashber (Karamazov)) with the delicate spiritual symbolism and the fairy tale imagination pioneered by Reb Nachman.

This is the book to savor and to remember the world that was and to recognize the world that is today.
Rainpick
According to the back cover of this very (very very) long book, it is a "protean work: a tale of a divided family and divided souls, a panoramic picture of an Eastern European town, a social satire, a kabbalistic allegory, an innovative fusion of modernist art and traditional storytelling, a tale of weird humor and mounting tragic power, embellished with a host of uncanny and fantastical figures drawn from... the depth of the unconscious." I have to say, the book is true to the description. Although what in the name of god this description actually means and what in the world a bizarre and confused tale like this tells, I cannot tell you. An allegory from the depth of unconscious? Mounting tragic power? Weird humor? Please, someone enlighten me. The book was weird indeed, but that wasn't humorous to me. Perhaps it's my own lack of appreciation for symbolism and surrealist fiction. I tend to prefer realistic fiction so I'm prone to dislike of a tome like this that isn't grounded in reality, has no direction, is extremely wordy and drawn out and simply does not engage. Generally, I enjoy anything that portrays Eastern European Jewish life pre WWII. But this wasn't a book worth spending 10+ hours on. I wouldn't recommend it.
Dandr
Not a book stocked in the remaining bookstore near here. It was much easier, all things considered, to order on line.
Jek
An epic work of a vanished world. The transcription from the Yiddish original is faulty in places. Despite these shortcomings, the book is of lasting value.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
This aims at being another family tale in the style of Buddenbrooks and The Brothers Karamasov., but it falls a bit short of the level of those two. Nevertheless, it is strong in character delineation and social background. In style it suffers from 19th century authorial intrusions and asides which are surprising in a book written in 1939.