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eBook More Tomorrow Other Stories download

by Stephen Jones,Michael Marshall Smith

eBook More Tomorrow  Other Stories download ISBN: 0974420301
Author: Stephen Jones,Michael Marshall Smith
Publisher: Earthling Publications; 1st edition (October 1, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 488
ePub: 1868 kb
Fb2: 1664 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt doc docx lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

MORE TOMORROW & OTHER STORIES is the definitive collection of Michael Marshall Smith’s shorter fiction and includes over two dozen of his . Introduction: Alias Smith & Jones, by Stephen Jones.

Other books by Michael Marshall Smith.

The Other Woman" by Sandie Jones The Other Woman is an absorbing . Reprinted or new, Smith's hauntingly nasty stories are laced with an odd sort of beauty

The Other Woman" by Sandie Jones The Other Woman is an absorbing thriller with a great twist. A perfect beach read. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Reprinted or new, Smith's hauntingly nasty stories are laced with an odd sort of beauty. In one of the new stories, "Being Right," a man dissatisfied with his marriage finds a book, Hopes of a Lesser Demon, Part II, that allows him to summon up an angel to prove, in any given dispute, whether or not he is correct (lacking such proof is the cause of much of his marital frustration).

A definitive collection of Michael Marshall Smith's shorter fiction and includes over two dozen of his best short stories . - The handover - What you make it - Maybe.

A definitive collection of Michael Marshall Smith's shorter fiction and includes over two dozen of his best short stories, several new tales, and the novella. - - The handover - What you make it - Maybe next time - The book of irrational numbers - When God lived in a Kentish tgown - The man who drew cats - A place to stay - The dark land - To see the sea - Two shot - Last glance back

More Tomorrow & Other Stories is a collection by British author Michael Marshall Smith. It draws together 30 of the author's short stories, including several written specifically for this book.

More Tomorrow & Other Stories is a collection by British author Michael Marshall Smith. Smith's short stories had been partially collected in 1999's What You Make It, but this had only been published in the UK. More Tomorrow & Other Stories represented the first time that the stories had been published for the American market

by Michael Marshall Smith · Stephen Jones · John Picacio. MORE TOMORROW & OTHER STORIES features 30 of the author's best stor. The first ever collection of Michael Marshall Smith's award-winning short stories.

by Michael Marshall Smith · Stephen Jones · John Picacio. Going well beyond the scope of his UK collection from several years ago, this is the definitive collection of Smith's shorter fiction, as well as his long overdue first US collection. Best New Horror 12 (The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror,. The first piece of fiction Smith ever wrote - a short story called The Man Who Drew Cats - won the World Fantasy award. It's included here along with many others, some un.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Comments: (5)
Akinonris
Mr. Michael Marshall Smith has woven a collection of short stories that collectively
engage, unnerve and grip the reader with his command of words, imagery and a
lingering feeling that you witnessed the stories firsthand.
Buridora
Amazing collection! Mr Marshall Smith can really tell a story. Beautiful language, sense of humour, suspense and a little chill. What else can you ask for in a story? Has it all!
Invissibale
Very different but enjoyable!!
Thofyn
M.M. Smith is undoubtedly one of the best horror/fantasy writers in the short form genre. The way in which he crafts a first-person narrative that always ends with a gripping climax is unique and he rarely misses with his format. His characters are always fascinating if not tragically flawed. The best in the collection is "The Vaccinator," a hilarious, bizarre, MEN IN BLACK-tinged absurdist tale about a fixer who prevents kidnappings of the alien abduction variety. When a kidnapping that he is paid to prevent still happens, our hero is pissed and uncovers a mystery that is both amusing and chilling. "Hell Hath Enlarged Herself" is a close second. A long story that only really kicks in at the end, but truly worth the wait, "Hell" is about the relationships that form between three scientists and the virus that destroys their lives, unleashing a hell that none of them can escape. "More Tomorrow" is a lurid story about voyeurism and a guy who can only watch but can't help. "They Also Serve" is a gem in the vein of 2001 about a guy in space, escaping from the war that is being waged on his planet but unable to escape the schemes of his overprotective computer. "To Receive is Better" is, in fact, better than Smith's full-length version of the story, his book SPARES which lacks the tension and atmosphere and fear that permeates "To Receive." All these stories start with great protagonists and end with great climaxes that are often morally ambiguous and always chilling and tragic. A stellar collection that had me up late at night, wanting more.
Shaktit
Not having previously read this author, I picked this book up last year mainly because I got a great deal on an edition whose value has sky-rocketed. Also, I knew that this collection along with several of the individual stories had won Best of... awards. This hefty collection is imposing and I really only started reading it when I did to sample the first story "More Tomorrow" - however, I was very quickly hooked and it has now earned a spot on my list of all-time favorites.

I thoroughly enjoyed just about every single story in here. The stories pretty much fall into the category of horror and scifi, but I think that they would be accessible to everyone, not just genre fans. While I will not review every story, I will list some of my favorites: More Tomorrow, The Book of Irrational Numbers, The Man Who Drew Cats, The Dark Land, To See The Sea, They Also Serve, To Receive Is Better, A Long Walk For The Last Time, and Enough Pizza.

A handful of the stories are fairly tech-heavy, and I am not sure how a non-savvy reader might respond to them, but I think they would be fine. Also, while most of the stories are not much more than 10 years old or less, some of the stories can feel a bit dated due to the detailed descriptions of computer technology and terminology that has become obsolete. (As a computer geek, I found it kind of humorous to read about a man's excitement about the delivery of a state-of-the-art computer for which he paid top dollar. The computer, which probably became useless 5 or 6 years ago, was described in realistic detail in the story.)