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eBook The Shining download

by Stephen King

eBook The Shining download ISBN: 0881037265
Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Econo-Clad Books (August 1981)
Language: English
ePub: 1100 kb
Fb2: 1190 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi lit doc lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The Shining is a horror novel by American author Stephen King. Published in 1977, it is King's third published novel and first hardback bestseller: the success of the book firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre

The Shining is a horror novel by American author Stephen King. Published in 1977, it is King's third published novel and first hardback bestseller: the success of the book firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre. The setting and characters are influenced by King's personal experiences, including both his visit to The Stanley Hotel in 1974 and his recovery from alcoholism.

The most wonderfully gruesome man on the planet. Other Books by This Author. An undisputed master of suspense and terror. probably knows more about scary goings-on in confined, isolated places than anybody since Edgar Allan Po. -Entertainment Weekly. He's the author who can always make the improbable so scary you'll feel compelled to check the locks on the front door. His contribution to this book has been large, and for it, my thanks.

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, is also a bestseller.

Synopsis: Jack Torrance, his wife Wendy, and their young son Danny move into the Overlook Hotel, where Jack has been hired as the winter caretaker.

The Shining is the third book published by Stephen King; it is his third novel. The book was published by Doubleday in January 28, 1977. The book was followed in 2013 by the sequel Doctor Sleep. This classic novel is arguably King's most famous story and piece of literature. It deals with many of King's recurring themes, including alcoholism, domestic violence, misfit, yet gifted children and the insanity of authors.

It was Stephen King’s third published novel and the central characters are Jack and Wendy Torrance and their . The Shining is 416 pages long.

It was Stephen King’s third published novel and the central characters are Jack and Wendy Torrance and their young son, Danny. Jack Torrance is an ex-schoolteacher and sometime writer. He is also an alcoholic, but Jack has managed to get his drinking under control; his temper is, however, another matter. It is a great story and the book has a lot more depth to it than Stanley Kubrick’s film version of the story; so if you have seen the film-most people have-don’t think that gives you an excuse not to read the book. There are a lot of differences.

The Shining is a horror novel by American author Stephen King that was first published in 1977. It is King's third published novel and first hardback bestseller: the success of the book firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre

The Shining is a horror novel by American author Stephen King that was first published in 1977. It is King's third published novel and first hardback bestseller: the success of the book firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre. The setting and characters are influenced by King's personal experiences, including both his visit to The Townplace Suites in Williamsport in 1974 and his recovery from alcoholism.

It by. Stephen King (Goodreads Author). The Stand by. Stephen King (Goodreads Author), Bernie Wrightson (Illustrator).

Comments: (7)
Narder
I don't typically write reviews about books. I've read close to 20 SK books in the last year and a half and over more in my life...this is so unlike his normal character as a writer that it's unnerving. I've read IT, the Stand, 'Salem's Lot, Carrie, Dark Tower series 1-7.5(?) - everything chronologically before this book and tons of newer stuff (I'm working back through his catalogue from start to finish). Nothing compares to this. Prepare for the darkest form of horror. I can't with good conscience recommend anyone to read this book. It gave me nightmares every night that I read it. I woke up thinking about it, and couldn't get it out of my head. I'm reading something else as fast as I can...can't wait to get back to the basic SK. Nothing else holds a candle to this.
Kale
I had seen the movie before I read the book so going in I thought I knew what to expect. But I was actually caught off guard and found myself loving the book more then I loved the movie. I still think the movie is good but this book is just... more.

The characters in this book are just so complex. Each one of them feels real. One moment I am sympathetic with Jack a man who just can't seem to get a break. But the next moment I am scared of him and what he might do to his family. Wendy is also so much more complex. I found myself really interested in her and absolutely scared for her life.

Danny though is my favorite. He's such a bright and sweet boy and it was interesting to get into his head. I loved to read how conflicted he got between protecting his family but also not wanting to upset them. I also really love his interactions with Dick Hallorann who is also very interesting.

Overall this is an excellent creepy read.
Hilarious Kangaroo
This is one of those popularized works that is hard to read without imagining the characters created within Stanley Kubrick's reimagining of the Shining - assuming you've seen it, of course. In spite of having one's vision or version tainted, King's work stands on its own as vivid. His paintbrush for painting scenes always ends up relating characters to the East Coast but his vision of Colorado is a bold and beautiful one. And with that beauty, there is the suspected horror that comes with the package deal of a King novel. The characters in the Shining are well rounded, feasible and just a few degrees away from what real monsters are - drinking problems, anger issues, mental health deterioration and the real world cases of an idiomatic term for a claustrophobic reaction cabin fever and isolation. What makes this so horrific is the plausibility of these characters - those they gave you life and now want to take it away from you. This is worth a read - and it is read best by kindlelight in the dark.
Kadar
I love reading Stephen King books and one of the reasons why is that most people just write him off as a horror writer, but those that read his works should know that it if you had to put him in just one genre it would probably be more psychological. This especially rings true to me after reading "The Shining" which tells the story of Jack Torrance's struggle with remaining in control of his own actions and keeping his family safe from other things along with himself. Jack has made mistakes in the past and hurt his family do to his drinking but is really trying to start new but dealing with the struggles of trying not to drink, keeping his anger in check, doing what is best for his family. Jack's wife Wendy is trying to keep her son safe and help her husband, her biggest struggle is that she tries to trust Jack but at some points finds herself hating him. Jack's son Danny is young but has a very strong power that he later learns from the caretaker to refer to as a shine, gives him premonitions of things to come as well as some telepathy. Danny knows to much for his own good and understands that something is wrong with the hotel the Overlook but does not know how to explain it to his parents. Danny tries to save his dad and mom but does not know what to do and if his premonitions will even come true. The characters are really deep and full of their own problems and it is interesting to see the inner workings of each and really connect to them.
Mr_KiLLaURa
Pet Sematary has always been one of my favorite Stephen King stories. I’m still terrified just thinking about certain scenes from the movie. I hadn’t read the book since I was a kid so I figured I was long overdue for a re-read.

This is, famously, the book that King himself considers the most frightening he has ever written. He has expressed regret over publishing it, claiming that it’s too dark, too bleak, that it goes too far.

I understand why he feels that way. Reading Pet Sematary as an adult has been a horrifying experience. I’m now at a point in my life where I have an acute fear of mortality—both my own and that of those I love. Pet Sematary exploits that very fear.

We all know what it’s like to lose a loved one. What if there was a way to bring them back? Would you do it, even if it meant opening a door into the depths of darkness and terror? We all want to feel like we have some semblance of control, like we’re not at the whim of an indifferent universe where death can strike at any time. But at what cost?

As Pet Sematary’s Louis Creed grapples with these very questions, we feel an overwhelming sense of dread. We know tragedy and horror await he and his family, and all we can do is sit back and watch it unfold, secretly hoping that if given the chance, we wouldn’t make the same mistakes. After all, as Louis’s neighbor Jud warns, “sometimes dead is better.”

Pet Sematary had me in its grip from the first few pages and never let up. It’s a masterful story about death, love, grief and the hopelessness of trying to escape the will of the universe.