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eBook House Atreides (Prelude to Dune) download

by Brian Herbert

eBook House Atreides (Prelude to Dune) download ISBN: 0340751762
Author: Brian Herbert
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton; New Ed edition (April 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 624
ePub: 1127 kb
Fb2: 1609 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf doc lrf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

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Dune: House Atreides is a 1999 science fiction novel by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, set in the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. It is the first book in the Prelude to Dune prequel trilogy, which takes place before the events of Frank Herbert's celebrated 1965 novel Dune. The Prelude to Dune novels draw from notes left behind by Frank Herbert after his death.

If you are a fan of the original Dune series by Frank Herbert, you should also like this first book in the series of sequels by his son Brian in collaboration with Kevin J. Anderson.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. If you are a fan of the original Dune series by Frank Herbert, you should also like this first book in the series of sequels by his son Brian in collaboration with Kevin J. Dune: House Atreides is actually more of a prequel, going into some of the histories of the characters in the original Dune series.

Dune: House Harkonnen (Prelude to Dune Book 2). Brian Herbert. Anderson

Dune: House Harkonnen (Prelude to Dune Book 2). Dune: House Corrino (Prelude to Dune Book 3). Dune: The Battle of Corrin: Book Three of the Legends of Dune Trilogy. This is an excellent story, full of action and intrigue.

Dune: House Atreides (1999). This touching tribute to his father garnered Brian a Hugo Award finalist nomination for Best Related Book. Dune: House Harkonnen (2000). Dune: House Corrino (2001). Hunting Harkonnens (2002 short story). Brian Herbert (b. 1947) is an American author and the son of Frank Herbert, who was the creator of the Dune series and much of its supporting 'universe'. While Brian Herbert has had several of his own novels published, he is presently most famous for his work that expands on his father's Dune novels.

Herbert, Brian; Anderson, Kevin . 1962-; Herbert, Frank. Dune (Imaginary place). New York : Bantam Books. Based on the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert.

The blood feud between House Atreides and House Harkonnen is about to begin. Drawing on notes, outlines and correspondence Frank Herbert left behind at his death, as well as conversations and brainstorming sessions Brian Herbert held with his father, House Atreides is a breathtaking story of war, treachery and decadence; of love, loyalty and steadfastness in the face of overwhelming odds. It is the year 10,154 of the Imperial Calendar, and for four decades the planet Arrakis - called Dune by its inhabitants - has been ruled by the Harkonnen family On Arrakis, a. .

Dune: House Atreides. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson October 1999. This book is for our mentor, Frank Herbert, who was every bit as fascinating and complex as the marvelous Dune universe he created. Ed Kramer, for being the bridge that brought us together in the first place. Rebecca Moesta Anderson, for her unflagging imagination, brainstorming, and plain hard work to make this novel the best it could be. Jan Herbert, for allowing the creation of this project to continue during a wedding-anniversary trip to Europe, and for so much more.

Thufir Hawat, Mentat and Security Commander to House Atreides. Lady Helena Atreides, her personal journals. The surest way to keep a secret is to make people believe they already know the answer. Ancient Fremen wisdom. There are weapons you cannot hold in your hands. You can only hold them in your mind. They demonstrate subtle, highly effective skills in the aligned arts of observation and data collection.

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Comments: (7)
Siratius
I really liked this book.

If you are a fan of the original Dune series by Frank Herbert, you should also like this first book in the series of sequels by his son Brian in collaboration with Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides is actually more of a prequel, going into some of the histories of the characters in the original Dune series.

This is an excellent story, full of action and intrigue. The authors keep the practice of including little philosophical quotes from various people in the Dune universe at the beginning of most chapters, but somehow these quotes, or at least their relevance to the rest of the story, are somewhat easier to understand than those associated with the original series. And, despite the complicated plots and counter-plots, the action in this book is somewhat easier to understand as well.
Kinashand
I gave this 5-stars because it fulfills for me the need to know the back stories. I believe that this is the second time that I've read this one. I ams satisfied with the length and the detail. The writing style is much different than the original series and suffers somewhat in comparison. It could have had more edge to it. In fact, my number-1 complaint is that it is too soft and indirect, versus the original series.
Zaryagan
Enjoyed this book very much. Several years ago I had read all of the Dune series and I liked reading about young Leto and how he started on his path of being honorable man and such a decent ruler. Got an idea how the line of the Emperor became polluted. Apparently the Harkonnens always had a tainted DNA that just kept being true in each generation to its horrible self.
Dagdarad
A fine beginning to this foray into Dune's mysterious past. The early, formative years of Leto Atreides, the beginning of Baron Harkonnens' visceral hatred of his mortal enemy, and how Shaddam Corrino becomes Padishah Emporer are revealed. I thoroughly enjoyed this first novel in the Herbert/Anderson prequel Dune trilogy. I am just dying to see what happens to the Verniusrefugees on Caladan & how Leto meets a young to-be Lady Jessica.
Wymefw
Of all the pre-Dune 'Dune Universe' titles, this is the first one that is actually a Dune prequel -- the first one to introduce any of the characters we know from the great original, "Dune." Though the title might make one believe that the entire book concentrates only on the Atreides, that is simply not the case. Together with the next two books that complete the trilogy, this book presents a well-rounded story.
Ces
I had some ambivalent feelings about this book. On one hand, we get all the components of the original Dune saga: Duke Leto, Bene Tlaxu, Shai Hulud, etc. It reminds us that Dune lives on as long as die-hard fans like ourselves are around. Unfortunately, Kevin J. Anderson falls short of the masterful Frank Herbert. The plots are generally predictable (even without knowledge of the Dune series), but I found them interesting nonetheless. The author explained too much overtly or with overuse of cliche, and this detracted from the subtle mystery that surrounded the original Dune. I enjoyed Anderson's portrayal of the Baron Harkonnen, but I was most disappointed with Duncan Idahoe. Granted, Duncan did have a difficult time having his parents gunned down and being chased through the hunting grounds, but I thought his escape was too easy. I expected something more stressful, more painful of his experience, torture to the limits of human endurance or even molestation by the Baron himself. I also expected Leto to have something more to do with his escape. Remember, Duncan was supposed to have experienced so much terror so much pain from the Harkonnens that he could "never" repay his debt to the Atreides family, not in a hundred ghola lifetimes of service to the God Emperor Leto. It just did not seem like enough. The Harkonnens killed his family and chased him a little bit, and then he escaped.
Tiainar
This book is the first of a set of three prequels to Dune. It aligns seamlessly to the Dune universe factually and for me most importantly in the style of writing.

It was very exiting to live in (and on) Dune again and experience more of the background, characters, challenges and cultures of the universe.
Despite the haters, I found this entire prequel trilogy fun, exciting, and with delicious background on the dune universe and its characters. Re-reading Dune after reading the trilogy was phenomenal.

Don't listen to the Internet hate. Give them a shot.