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by Bernard Cornwell

eBook The Pagan Lord: A Novel (Saxon Tales) download ISBN: 0062298666
Author: Bernard Cornwell
Publisher: HarperLuxe; Larger Print edition (January 7, 2014)
Language: English
Pages: 512
ePub: 1300 kb
Fb2: 1772 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lrf azw txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The Saxon Stories (also known as Saxon Tales/Saxon Chronicles in the US and The Warrior Chronicles and most recently as The Last Kingdom series) is a historical novel series written by Bernard Cornwell about the history of Anglo-Saxon England in the.

The Saxon Stories (also known as Saxon Tales/Saxon Chronicles in the US and The Warrior Chronicles and most recently as The Last Kingdom series) is a historical novel series written by Bernard Cornwell about the history of Anglo-Saxon England in the ninth and tenth centuries. The protagonist of the series is Uhtred of Bebbanburg, born to a Saxon lord in Northumbria, but captured and adopted by the Danes.

The Pagan Lord: A Novel . .has been added to your Cart. Cornwell excels at depicting gloriously gory battle scenes as well as the inherent religious, political, and martial conflicts upon which a great nation was born. Series: Saxon Tales (Book 7). Hardcover: 320 pages.

Series also known as: The Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories The Saxon Tales Le storie dei re sassoni Uhtred Serie 800-talets England . Shelve The Pagan Lord. The new novel in Bernard Cornwell’s number on. ore.

Series also known as: The Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories The Saxon Tales Le storie dei re sassoni Uhtred Serie 800-talets England Саксонски. Shelve Warriors of the Storm.

Электронная книга "The Pagan Lord: A Novel", Bernard Cornwell

Электронная книга "The Pagan Lord: A Novel", Bernard Cornwell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Pagan Lord: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Pagan Lord: A Novel (Saxon Tales) by Bernard Cornwell. The bestsellers category features both fantastic fiction and nonfiction books, including New York Times best sellers, USA Today best selling books, and more! Travel across centuries and continents in these captivating historical fiction books! Bernard Cornwell-"the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal)-returns to his Saxon Tales saga with the epic story of divided loyalties, bloody battles, and the struggle to unite Britain

Alfred the Great is dead and Edward his son reigns as king

Alfred the Great is dead and Edward his son reigns as king. Wessex survives but peace cannot hold. The Danes in the north, led by Viking Cnut Longsword, stand ready to invade and will never rest until the emerald crown is theirs. Uhtred, once Alfred’s great warrior but now out of favour with the new king, must lead a band of outcasts north to recapture his old family home, that great Northumbrian fortress, Bebbanburg

The Saxon Tales is a continuing historical novel series written by the historical novelist Bernard Cornwell about 9th and 10th century Britain.

The Saxon Tales is a continuing historical novel series written by the historical novelist Bernard Cornwell about 9th and 10th century Britain. The protagonist of the series is Uhtred, sometimes known as Uhtred Uhtredson and Uhtred of Bebbanburg. Uhtred is born in Northumbria, but captured and adopted by the Danes. The story takes place during the Danish invasions of Britain, when all but one of the English kingdoms is conquered

Bernard Cornwell-"the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal)-returns to his Saxon Tales saga with the epic story of divided loyalties, bloody battles, and the struggle to unite Britain.

Bernard Cornwell-"the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal)-returns to his Saxon Tales saga with the epic story of divided loyalties, bloody battles, and the struggle to unite Britain. At the onset of the tenth century, England is in turmoil. Alfred the Great is dead and his son Edward reigns as king.

The seventh installment of Bernard Cornwell’s bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, “like Game of Thrones, but real” (The Observer, London)—the basis for The Last Kingdom, the hit BBC America television series.

At the onset of the tenth century, England is in turmoil. Alfred the Great is dead and his son Edward reigns as king. Wessex survives but peace cannot hold: the Danes in the north, led by Viking Cnut Longsword, stand ready to invade and will never rest until the emerald crown is theirs.

Uhtred, once Alfred’s great warrior but now out of favor with the new king, must lead a band of outcasts north to recapture his old family home, the impregnable Northumbrian fortress Bebbanburg.

Loyalties will be divided and men will fall as each Saxon kingdom is drawn into the bloodiest battle yet with the Danes—a war that will decide the fate of every king, and the entire English nation.

With The Pagan Lord, New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell—"the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today” (Wall Street Journal)—continues his magnificent epic of the making of England during the Middle Ages, vividly bringing to life the uneasy alliances, violent combat, and deadly intrigue that gave birth to the British nation.

Comments: (7)
Realistic
The time to restore him to his beloved Northumbrian Castle is long gone. Bernard Cornwell proved himself from Sharpe to the Grail Quest but with Uthred he has been milking the dollars with repetitive tale after repetitive tale. Please please move on!
Blackredeemer
Bernard Cornwell's special talent is creating characters called names like Uhtred and places like Bebbanburg that sound real. They are based on England's history, and though Cornwell must fill in the details from the fragments of documents that remain from the 10th century, he does so with firm control of his cast of characters and the nature of the English countryside.

The action is non-stop in THE PAGAN LORD, with Uhtred still fighting against the invading Christians. Worst, for him, is that his own son becomes a priest. The land promised to him, the family home at Bebbanburg, is in the hands of a disloyal uncle.

Uhtred's voice in this book is maturing. He notices more around him than a comely wench and thinks more frequently of how he hopes to die as Wyrd will bring death to all. He is funny, savage, and crafty while also being kind, loving, and even poetic. The insults flung from one army to the other are priceless though probably not for modern use on the freeway.

I believe this is my favorite of the Saxon series books.
Bloodfire
This novel is excellent. It is part of the Saxon Chronicles series, but can easily be read as a stand alone novel. In fact, I had only read book 1 previously and I had no trouble at all getting into this novel. This tells the story of Uhtred Uhtredsson, a Saxon noble caught between the Christian Saxon world and the Danish pagan world. At the beginning of the story, an angry Uhtred accidentally kills a Bishop when he learns that his son and namesake has become a priest. Reminiscent of a scene in the first novel, Uhtred strips his son of the name Uhtred and declares that his younger son is now Uhtred. Shortly thereafter, Uhtred is shunned by his community and finds himself on a quest to retake Bebbanburg, his fortress, from a treacherous Uncle and to unravel schemes from the Viking Cnut and two Saxon Kings. Ultimately, Uhtred must choose between the Christian Saxons who have shunned him and the pagan Vikings who have come to steal the Saxon land.

The writing is raw and riveting. Uhtred is no modern hero. He is brutal and thoroughly rooted in the Dark Ages, but moral in an odd way, in a time where the sense of right and wrong is not clearly aligned with modern sensibilities. Yet, Uhtred is no medieval stereotype either. He is who he is, unashamedly, and he has his own value system. Cornwall does an excellent job at making him very real, even though modern readers cannot really relate to his thought process.

All in all, I greatly enjoyed this book. It made me wonder why I never read any other books in the series. I loved the first one too, so if you like Dark Ages historical fiction, this is a great bet.
Kare
This is the seventh installment in the story of Uhtred of Bebbanburg, and while it's a good, rousing series of adventures, it nevertheless feels a bit as though the author is marking time. But that may be somewhat the fault of the historical record. The previous book was centered on the death of King Alfred of Wessex in 899, and what happened when the Danes finally reacted. Now it's ten years on, a decade of Alfred's son, Edward, as king, and there's been a precarious peace -- well, an armed lull in the generation-long all-out war, punctuated by raids for cattle and slaves. Uhtred has settled in on his estate near the upper border of Mercia, raising his two sons and chafing at the inactivity. Then his eldest son, also named Uhtred (it's a family tradition), becomes a priest and his father not only disowns him, he semi-accidentally kills the abbot who consecrated him. This is not going to make him any friends in the Church. Then he rides home only to find half the place in flames, thanks to Jarl Cnut, with whom he's been at odds for many years. Someone has kidnapped Cnut's wife and two children, and they were flying Uhtred's banner. And then the local Christians, led by a bishop, burn the rest of his farm, in revenge for the abbot. Enough is enough. Uhtred takes his few remaining loyal warriors, buys a ship in London, and sails north to see if he can finagle his way into the fortress of Bebbanburg, of which he is the rightful lord, but which his uncle has held for forty years.

Uhtred is getting older now (though he still has several decades left to live) and he's beginning to doubt himself a little. Will he ever get back what's his? Will he be able to continue defeating the Danes? Or will Engaland became Daneland instead? Will the Saxons ever wake up to the need for action and stop listening to the defeatist Church leaders? Well, he maybe be slowing down a bit physically, but his brain is ticking right over, just like always. And when Cnut's machinations and manipulations to capture first East Anglia, then Mercia, and then Wessex begin to look they might be successful, Uhtred comes up with his usual canny stratagems to rouse King Edward and defeat the enemy. The finale is the battle at Tettenhall in AD 910, about which nothing is known except that it was fought, that Edward was there with a Saxon army, and that the Danes were defeated. This gives Cornwell license to invent practically everything else in the process of telling his story, and in which (as always) he succeeds brilliantly. Nobody does battle scenes like Cornwell.