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by Maureen Peters

eBook Katheryn, the Wanton Queen download ISBN: 0006126936
Author: Maureen Peters
Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (July 1971)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1515 kb
Fb2: 1307 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: txt rtf doc docx
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Maureen Peters was married and divorced twice; she had a. .Katheryn, the Wanton Queen (1971) - on Catherine Howard. Her first novels set a high standard which has been maintained, even surpassed, with each new book.

Maureen Peters was married and divorced twice; she had a son and two daughters. She died on 8 April 2008. The Cloistered Flame (1971) - on Teresa of Ávila. Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972) - a novelization of the Ian Thorne screenplay of the film. The Woodville Wench (published in US as The Queen Who Never Was) (1972) - on Elizabeth Woodville, consort of King Edward IV and The War of the Roses.

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Katheryn, The Wanton Queen is the heartfelt tale of Henry VIII's fifth wife. Never Miss Another Great Book. Free: Ryder – The Lost Breed MC. I’m not a good man.

Publisher:Ulverscroft Large Print Books.

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Katheryn, The Wanton Queen is the heartfelt tale of Henry VIII’s fifth wife. Maureen Peters was born in Caernarvon, North Wales. She was educated at grammar school and attended the University College of North Wales, Bangor, where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree and a diploma of Education. She taught disabled children before taking up writing under her own name and many pseudonyms. Peters has produced many books and contributed short stories to many magazines and her writing normally focuses on royalty, the War of the Roses and the Tudor period.

Katheryn, the Wanton Queen, Robert Hale (London, England), 1967 . In Library Journal D. E. Litt called Peters's biography "a valuable book for calling our attention to a notable woman.

Katheryn, the Wanton Queen, Robert Hale (London, England), 1967, Beagle (New York, NY), 1971. Mary, the Infamous Queen, Robert Hale (London, England), 1968, Beagle (New York, NY), 1971. Bride for King James, Robert Hale (London, England), 1968. Joan of the Lilies, Robert Hale (London, England), 1969. Maureen Peters is a prolific writer of historical romances, many of them set during the Tudor and Plantagenet periods of English history. The critic described Peters as "a thoughtful, sensitive biographer.

Are you sure you want to remove Katheryn the Wanton Queen from your list? Katheryn the Wanton Queen. Published December 1973 by Ulverscroft Large Print Books.

Comments: (7)
Tegore
Katheryn Howard, Henry the Eighth's fifth wife, has had few books written about her-and the ones I have read either portray her as a reckless, promiscuous girl-or as the helpless victim of a tyrant. Ms Peters portrays her simply as a pretty, vivacious, sensual but basically naive young woman who is thrilled to become a queen, but who cannot handle the life this requires of her. Katheryn grows up as a "poor relation" in the rather negligent home of her grandmother. She lives in a dormitory of young women, and the easy atmosphere combined with a lack of supervision leads young Katheryn into love affairs she is really not ready for. When she catches the king's interest, she and her family hide her past- and her love for her cousin, Tom Culpepper- so that she can become queen: which slowly and relentlessly leads to tragedy. This book is easy enough for average readers, yet intricate enough in plot and substance for more advanced Tudor followers. The plot and dialogue are quick, descriptive, and sparkling. Don't miss this vintage Tudor classic.
August
Since I have read a lot of books about the Tudor period nothing in this book surprised me. The main character is a fairly well know historical figure and when you're dealing with true history...you can't exactly change it. Still the book was very well written and held my attention though I knew how it would end. The author made Catherine Howard come alive and made you care about her even though she was childish and rather foolish. To anyone who loves or wants to learn more about history I would recommend this book.
Lavivan
Excellent bout King Henry' s second wife to become beheaded. The description is marvelous allowing the reader to become part of history. The descriptions were accurate and full of descriptive detail. If this time period is interesting to you it is definitely your cup of English tea.
Ghile
This book was well written. It moved through the historical timeline very quickly. We do not get to really know the queen as a person, outside of her being fairly spoiled and naive.
Chankane
Good book!
JOGETIME
A pleasant, short, personal story of very interesting times. Gives a real feel for the historic events from the standpoint of of an intimate observer.
Kajishakar
Peters tells the story of Kitty Howard’s brief life, and even briefer queenship, through her servant the fictional character Geraldine Lyle. Very few stories have been written about her, which makes this one even more of a gift. During the course of this story we also learn about three of Henry VIII’s four wives who preceded her: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, and Anne of Cleves. The book is a quick, light read and gets better as the story unfolds. Readers who are new to the subject matter will likely enjoy it best. Peters’ fluid prose is always a joy to read.
This was a fairly good representation of the fifth queen of Henry VIII, Katheryn Howard. She was a fickle young girl who rose to the highest place a woman could reach at the time. I had a tough time at the beginning understanding who was telling the story. At times it seemed like the story was being told from an omniscient point of view and then it would switch to a first person story. It did cover the major moments of Katheryn's life and what she would have done and dealt with. All in all it was a good story and flowed fairly well once it was past the first few chapters. It would be good for beginner readers of Tudor England and Henry's queens.