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by Joseph Payne Brennan

eBook Nine Horrors and a Dream download ISBN: 9997538625
Author: Joseph Payne Brennan
Publisher: Arkham House Pub; First Edition edition (June 1958)
Language: English
ePub: 1974 kb
Fb2: 1780 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: docx lit txt doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Joseph Payne Brennan. Collectors and fans will delight in this inexpensive reissue of Brennan's hard-to-find classic, Nine Horrors and a Dream.

Joseph Payne Brennan. This collection, originally published by Arkham House in 1958, features stories published by Weird Tales and other pulp magazines of the 1950s - including the much-anthologized "Slime," which inspired the ever-popular thriller The Blob.

Nine Horrors and a Dream book. Acclaimed by Stephen King as "a master of the unashamed horror tale," Joseph Payne Brennan wrote hundreds of tales of terror, suspense, and fantasy.

Acclaimed by Stephen King as a master of the unashamed horror tale, Joseph Payne Brennan wrote hundreds .

Acclaimed by Stephen King as a master of the unashamed horror tale, Joseph Payne Brennan wrote hundreds of tales of terror, suspense, and fantasy. This collection, originally published by Arkham House in 1958, features stories published by Weird Tales and other pulp magazines of the 1950s - including the much-anthologized Slime, which inspired the ever-popular thriller The Blob.

Joseph Payne Brennan (December 20, 1918 – January 28, 1990) was an American writer of fantasy and horror fiction, and also a poet. Of Irish ancestry, he was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut and he lived most of his life in New Haven, Connecticut, and worked as an Acquisitions Assistant at the Sterling Memorial Library of Yale University for over 40 years. Brennan published several hundred short stories (estimates range between four and five hundred), two novellas and reputedly thousands of poems

Nine Horrors and a Dream. Brennan, Joseph Payne. Published by Dover Publications. Condition: New. Nine Horrors and a Dream. Seller Inventory BBS-9780486834191.

Nine Horrors and a Dream. ISBN 10: 0486834190 ISBN 13: 9780486834191. More information about this seller Contact this seller 3. Stock Image.

This week’s book Nine Horrors and a Dream has been one of my most sought after books these last several years. I already have Mr. Brennan’s other paperback collection The Shapes of midnight and previously owned 3 hard back collections which I parted with during the great book purge of 2009. I finally found a good copy at abebooks. com for a very reasonable price. To be honest though, all of Mr. Brennan’s short story collections are hard to find and at a high price.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Brennan, Joseph Payne

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Brennan, Joseph Payne; Read online.

Joseph Payne Brennan (December 20, 1918 – January 28, 1990) was an American writer of fantasy and horror . August Derleth assembled Brennan's first collection of Horror fiction, NINE HORRORS AND A DREAM, from these. Brennan's first professional. sale came in December 1940 with the publication of the poem, "When Snow Is Hung", which appeared in the Christian Science Monitor Home Forum, and he continued writing poetry up until the time of his death. Brennan's stories, though scarce and mostly out-of-print today, are widely considered by horror fiction enthusiasts to be classics.

Acclaimed by Stephen King as "a master of the unashamed horror tale," Joseph Payne Brennan wrote hundreds of tales of terror, suspense, and fantasy.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Nine Horrors and a Dream by Joseph Brennan .

Nine Horrors and a Dream by Joseph Brennan 9780486834191 (Paperback, 2019) Delivery UK delivery is within 3 to 5 working days. Read full description.

Comments: (5)
Cemav
I bought this used copy after Stephen King recommended it in one of his articles for Entertainment Weekly. It was well worth the price because this collection is equal to the works of H.P. Lovecraft in terms of being able to make you feel the horrors are real and really giving you the chills!
Beanisend
Good book.
Ese
The dedication to this collection reads: "To the memory of _Weird Tales_, 1923-1954". Brennan began writing for _Weird Tales_ fairly late in its life. His first story for _WT_ was "The Green Parrot" in the July, 1952 issue. More stories followed: "Slime" (1953), "On the Elevator," (1953), and "The Calamandar Chest," (1954). "Canavan's Back Yard" didn't appear there, and neither did "I'm Murdering Mr. Massingham". But they would have been comfortable entries in the pages of the Unique Magazine. After the demise of _Weird Tales_ in 1954, Brennan started a magazine of his own called _Macabre_ that was devoted to fiction and poetry in the _WT_ tradition. It ran from 1957 to 1976-- not a bad track record.

You don't really read Brennan for his originality of plot. "The Green Parrot," for example, is a fairly conventional ghost story. But it has a style, a compactness, a smoothness to it. These qualities are present in his other tales as well. Brennan always goes down as smooth as good Kentucky bourbon. And sometimes there are other virtues as well in his tales. In "Levitation," there is an ending so appropriately _awful_ that it leaves you gasping. What would you do if you were in that audience? "Canivan's Back Yard" is a chiller so carefully constructed and with such attention to detail that you might just begin to wonder about your own back yard. "Slime" has a vision of horror that sticks with you:

In the brief flash of the rifle he saw something black and enormous and glistening, like a great flapping hood, break through the final thicket. It seemed to be _rolling_ toward him, and it was moving with nightmare swiftness. (15)

Damon Knight has written that such a passage appeals to our repulsion of death-in-life and the smell of rotting meat. The story reminds me a bit of Theodore Sturgeon's "It" and Ted Thomas and Kate Wilhelm's _The Clone_.

Other stories in the collection include "The Mail for Juniper Hill," another thoroughly predictable ghost story; and "Death in Peru" and "The Hunt," two rather grisly stories of the macabre. The title of this collection implies that one of the ten stories herein is a "dream". I will leave it up to the individual reader to decide which one fits that category.

Unfortunately, this book is a bit hard to obtain. Paperback editions are few, and hardback editions are expensive. But try to get a copy if you can.
Tiainar
"Nine Horrors and a Dream" is a collection of Joseph Payne Brennan's best horror tales, and was first published by Arkham House in 1958. The book consists of short stories that, for the most part, first appeared in the classic pulp magazine "Weird Tales" in the early 1950s; indeed, the book is dedicated to that great magazine, which ended its 31-year run in 1954. Prospective readers of Brennan's collection should be advised that this is NOT an easy book to acquire. It's been out of print for many years, and it took me a half dozen attempts at Ebay auction before I could get my hands on a decently priced copy. But it was worth the trouble. This is an extremely enjoyable bunch of scary stories, and Brennan turns out to be an exceptionally readable author, writing in a clean and forthright style. The 10 stories in this collection run the gamut from the monstrous to the macabre, with many of them of the ghostly variety.
The book kicks off with a tremendous start with the longest tale, "Slime." In this story, a monstrous blob of submarine goop gets thrown onto land and starts doing what it does best: devouring things. This is one fun story, almost on a par with H.G. Wells' 1896 tale of submarine monsters invading the English coast, "The Sea Raiders" (and if you knew what high esteem I have for Wells, you would realize that this is high praise indeed!). Next up is a short piece on hypnotism gone awry, "Levitation"; it leaves a vivid impression, despite its brevity. In "The Calamander Chest," a man discovers that inexpensive furniture may indeed carry a higher price. This is an excellent ghostly tale; I could easily picture it as an EC comic book! In "Death in Peru," we learn that the practice of voodoo is not confined to Africa and Haiti. This short story leads to an appropriately grisly conclusion. "On the Elevator" and "The Green Parrot" are up next; both are tales of spirits coming back to either harass or perplex the living, and both are finely done. The highly regarded "Canavan's Back Yard" follows, and this story of an accursed piece of real estate is perhaps the creepiest tale in the bunch. Brennan creates a malignant atmosphere with seeming ease in this marvelous piece of sinister witchery. "I'm Murdering Mr. Massington" tells of a man who will do practically anything to be remembered after his death, and the narrator of the tale is, apparently, Brennan himself. This is a simple but clever little story. In "The Hunt," a man finds himself being pursued for no apparent reason by another man. We only learn the tracker's reason at the very end, and it does come as something of a shock. To wind up the collection, there's "The Mail for Juniper Hill," in which a postal worker in turn-of-the-century Connecticut does anything to make sure that the mail does indeed get through. I'm not sure whether this is a ghostly tale or not; it's somewhat ambiguous, but still mighty enjoyable reading. All in all, my only complaint with "Nine Horrors and a Dream" is its length. At a mere 121 pages, it can hardly be called a generous collection. Most readers will wish, at the book's conclusion, that it were more like "Twenty Horrors and a Dream." The book has been chosen for inclusion in Jones and Newman's excellent overview volume "Horror: 100 Best Books," and I have no problem with that inclusion. It's on the slender side and pulpy as anything, but horror stories don't come much more fun.
The Rollers of Vildar
Even if we had only this one book by which to assess J.P. Brennan, there would be no doubt that he is one of the modern masters of the horror short story. "Canavan's Back Yard" is probably one of the top horror stories of the century. Almost as effective are "Slime", "The Green Parrot", and "On the Elevator". Brennan's style is lean and unpretentious, and his evocation of a chilly atmosphere is excellent. His chilly plots are even better. Highly recommended.