carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook Snake Eyes download

by Rosamond Smith

eBook Snake Eyes download ISBN: 0525934049
Author: Rosamond Smith
Publisher: Dutton Adult; First Edition edition (February 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1409 kb
Fb2: 1370 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc docx lit txt
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Snake Eyes by Rosamond Smith (1992-02-01) Hardcover – 1881.

Snake Eyes by Rosamond Smith (1992-02-01) Hardcover – 1881. by. Rosamond Smith (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Lovely blonde Gina O'Meara had seemingly the ideal life-a devoted husband, two well-behaved children.

Rosamond Smith is Joyce Carol Oates. This book is a psychological study of a family caught up in a nightmare. Michael and Gina seem to be a very well to do couple with children but the story asks "are they really happy".

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Under the pen name Rosamond Smith ( Nemesis, LJ 7/90), Joyce Carol Oates has written a creepy psychological thriller that seems at first to be about the effect a paroled convict has on a "perfect. Раздел 1. 3. Раздел 2. 5.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Author:Smith, Rosamond. Book Binding:Microfilm. We appreciate the impact a good book can have

Author:Smith, Rosamond. We appreciate the impact a good book can have. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used books are out there - we just had to let you know! Read full description. See details and exclusions. Smith Rosamond : Snake Eyes by Rosamond Smith (Microfilm). Pre-owned: lowest price.

This latest gothic potboiler from the thinly veiled Joyce Carol Oates pits a wide-eyed suburban lawyer and his oh-so-perfect family against the convicted murderer who comes to live in their hometown when he's served the eight years of his &.

This latest gothic potboiler from the thinly veiled Joyce Carol Oates pits a wide-eyed suburban lawyer and his oh-so-perfect family against the convicted murderer who comes to live in their hometown when he's served the eight years of his & sentence. Though he's never met tattooed Vietnam vet Lee Roy Sears, Michael O'Meara was instrumental five years earlier in getting his original death sentence commuted to life, and he's kept up a correspondence (much to his beautiful, decorously promiscuous wife Gina's dismay) that encourages Sears to set.

Snake Eyes - It is a tattoo-only a tattoo Rosamond Smith has never been in better form.

Snake Eyes - It is a tattoo-only a tattoo. A tattoo of a serpent with a human face on the sinewy arm of Lee Roy Sears, a convicted killer whose death sentence has been commuted to life imprisonment, thanks to the intervention of an idealistic young. Rosamond Smith has never been in better form.

Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. Great book - dark, gothic, perhaps a bit predicatable, but enjoyable reading nonetheless.

Convicted murderer Lee Roy Sears proves to be a talented sculptor, and when his good behavior earns him parole, a philanthropic family takes him into their suburban home, where the terror begins anew. 25,000 first printing. National ad/promo. BOMC.
Comments: (3)
Yannara
I don't think it was typical of Joyce Carol Oates. I wasn't expecting the violence and terror.
Dog_Uoll
I should say at the beginning that I'm not a Joyce Carol Oates fan. I understand her fiction was pathbreaking in the 60s and 70s, but I find it hard to relate to the worlds she describes, and I don't share the assumptions that drive her plots. She is a good but not great stylist with a tendency to bog her stories down with repetition, foreshadowing and flashback--tolerable in literary fiction but fatal for a thriller like Snake Eyes.

The conflict in this story is driven by a primitive veteran and ex-con introduced to a superficial suburban neighborhood that seems more 1950s than 1992, the year the novel is set. Self-indulgent neuroses lurk under the boring pretentiousness of the upper middle class bedroom community. Clunky symbolism abounds, such as one of the main characters' hopeless efforts to dredge his pond that leave him sunburned, scratched, filthy and exhausted. The social commentary would be biting, except that it seems directed at a 1960s era radical chic and art-that-shocks, tired targets for a 1992 book or a 2017 reader.

So I found a thriller that didn't thrill, a satire without current interest and a psychological drama told through pretentious symbolism.
Malaris
Great book - dark, gothic, perhaps a bit predicatable, but enjoyable reading nonetheless.