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eBook The Paris Wife: A Novel download

by Paula McLain

eBook The Paris Wife: A Novel download ISBN: 0345521307
Author: Paula McLain
Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1st edition (February 22, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1169 kb
Fb2: 1832 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit txt rtf mbr
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

McLain reinvents the story of Hadley and Ernest’s romance with the lucid grace of a practiced poet. The Seattle Times A novel that’s impossible to resist. It’s all here, and it all feels real.

McLain reinvents the story of Hadley and Ernest’s romance with the lucid grace of a practiced poet. Paula McLain is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels Love and Ruin, Circling the Sun, The Paris Wife, and A Ticket to Ride, the memoir Like Family: Growing Up in Other People’s Houses, and two collections of poetry.

ALSO BY PAULA MCLAIN A Ticket to Ride Like Family: Growing Up in Other People’s Houses: A Memoir The Paris Wife is. .Published in the United States by Ballantine Books, an imprint of The Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House, In. New York.

ALSO BY PAULA MCLAIN A Ticket to Ride Like Family: Growing Up in Other People’s Houses: A Memoir The Paris Wife is a work of historical fiction. The Paris wife : a novel, Paula McLain. p. cm. eISBN: 978-0-345-52132-3.

She has published two collections of poetry, a memoir about growing up in the foster system, and the novel A Ticket to Ride. McLain was born in 1965 in Fresno, California.

Author Paula McLain on The Paris Wife. Most of us know or think we know who Ernest Hemingway was - a brilliant writer full of macho swagger, driven to take on huge feats of bravery and a pitcher or two of martinis - before lunch

Author Paula McLain on The Paris Wife. Most of us know or think we know who Ernest Hemingway was - a brilliant writer full of macho swagger, driven to take on huge feats of bravery and a pitcher or two of martinis - before lunch. But beneath this man or myth, or some combination of the two, is another Hemingway, one we’ve never seen before. Hadley Richardson, Hemingway’s first wife, is the perfect person to reveal him to us - and also to immerse us in the incredibly exciting and volatile world of Jazz-age Paris

Then, straight away, Paula McLain pissed me off with some of her early writing in the book.

Even their demise is poignant and heartbreaking and messy, but rings with absolute truth. Then, straight away, Paula McLain pissed me off with some of her early writing in the book.

Women and book groups are going to eat up this novel

Women and book groups are going to eat up this novel. USA Today Written much in the style of Nancy Horan's Loving Frank. Paula McLain's fictional accou. Look for an excerpt from Paula McLain’s captivating new novel, Love and Ruin, about Hemingway’s third wife, Martha Gellhorn. Chicago, 1920: Hadley Richardson is a quiet d who has all but given up on love and happiness-until she meets Ernest Hemingway.

This novel is an ode to Hemingway’s time spent living in Paris with his first wife, Hadley, and their baby. The latter is centred around Hadley Richardson, Hemingway’s first wife

This novel is an ode to Hemingway’s time spent living in Paris with his first wife, Hadley, and their baby. It is during these years that Hemingway became familiar with Gertrude Stein, Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ezra Pound, among many other artists and writers of the ‘Lost Generation’. The latter is centred around Hadley Richardson, Hemingway’s first wife. The book chronicles Richardson’s and Hemingway’s relationship from its dreamy beginning to its heartbreakingly cold ending. Much of their relationship was spent raising their son, affectionately called Bumby, while living in Paris.

The Paris Wife - An instant national bestseller, this stunningly evocative, beautifully rendered story told in the . Even if you don’t love those things, McLain’s novel is a delight.

The Paris Wife - An instant national bestseller, this stunningly evocative, beautifully rendered story told in the voice of Ernest Hemingway. It gave me a sharp kind of sadness to think that no matter how much I loved him and tried to put him back together again, he might stay broken forever. Paula McLain, The Paris Wife. I certainly recommend The Paris Wife especially if you love literary name dropping and Paris. The Paris Wife - North Vancouver District Public Library. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain.

A Novel of Hemingway’s First Marriage. Hadley Richardson now comes into her own, sort of, as the long-suffering wife in Paula McLain’s stylish new novel. By brenda wineapplemarch 18, 2011. Narrated largely from Hadley’s point of view, The Paris Wife smoothly chronicles her five-year marriage to the novelist, most of which was spent in Paris among aspiring writers when, as McClain’s Hadley recalls, we were beautifully blurred and happy.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. ';A beautiful portrait of being in Paris in the glittering 1920sas a wife and as one's own woman

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. ';A beautiful portrait of being in Paris in the glittering 1920sas a wife and as one's own woman. Entertainment Weekly A deeply evocative story of ambition and betrayal, The Paris Wife captures the love affair between two unforgettable people: Ernest Hemingway and his wife Hadley. Chicago, 1920: Hadley Richardson is a quiet d who has all but given up on love and happinessuntil she meets Ernest Hemingway.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • “A beautiful portrait of being in Paris in the glittering 1920s—as a wife and as one’s own woman.”—Entertainment Weekly   A deeply evocative story of ambition and betrayal, The Paris Wife captures the love affair between two unforgettable people: Ernest Hemingway and his wife Hadley.NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People • Chicago Tribune • NPR • The Philadelphia Inquirer • Kirkus Reviews • The Toronto Sun • BookPage Chicago, 1920: Hadley Richardson is a quiet twenty-eight-year-old who has all but given up on love and happiness—until she meets Ernest Hemingway. Following a whirlwind courtship and wedding, the pair set sail for Paris, where they become the golden couple in a lively and volatile group—the fabled “Lost Generation”—that includes Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and F. Scott Fitzgerald.   Though deeply in love, the Hemingways are ill prepared for the hard-drinking, fast-living, and free-loving life of Jazz Age Paris. As Ernest struggles to find the voice that will earn him a place in history and pours himself into the novel that will become The Sun Also Rises, Hadley strives to hold on to her sense of self as her roles as wife, friend, and muse become more challenging. Eventually they find themselves facing the ultimate crisis of their marriage—a deception that will lead to the unraveling of everything they’ve fought so hard for.   A heartbreaking portrayal of love and torn loyalty, The Paris Wife is all the more poignant because we know that, in the end, Hemingway wrote that he would rather have died than fallen in love with anyone but Hadley.Praise for The Paris Wife“McLain smartly explores Hadley's ambivalence about her role as supportive wife to a budding genius.... Women and book groups are going to eat up this novel.” —USA TodayWritten much in the style of Nancy Horan's Loving Frank ... Paula McLain's fictional account of Hemingway's first marriage beautifully captures the sense of despair and faint hope that pervaded the era and their marriage.” —Associated PressLyrical and exhilarating . . . McLain offers a raw and fresh look at the prolific Hemingway. In this mesmerizing and helluva-good-time novel, McLain inhabits Richardson’s voice and guides us from Chicago—Richardson and Hemingway’s initial stomping ground—to the place where their life together really begins: Paris.” —Elle
Comments: (7)
Kazimi
After reading Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, author, Paula McLain, was inspired to write about Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley Richardson. She did extensive research for this novel. Although this is a work of fiction, it is
historical in nature and closely parallels real events.

This fascinating story is one of love and betrayal. Written primarily from the point of view of Hadley, the text is also interspersed with brief sections that are meant to reveal Hemingway’s perspective.

The couple was married only six years, 1921-1926, and Hemingway went on to marry three others in succession. Yet, Hemingway held Hadley as the dearest and was said to have wished that he had remained with her always. The Sun Also Rises is dedicated to Hadley and their son.

At age twenty, Hemingway married Hadley Richardson who was eight years his senior. Hadley, painfully shy, had been living a rather secluded life at the home of her sister and her sister's husband. When Ernest and Hadley married, they moved promptly to Paris and Hadley’s life changed dramatically. Many artists and writers were living in Paris and the couple mingled among them. They met Picasso, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald and others. Liquor flowed freely. Marital affairs were common.

Hemingway had started out as a newspaper reporter and struggled to find a niche with his novels and short stories. With fame, he thought nothing of stepping on those who had helped him get recognition. He began to covet other women who were attracted to the handsome, exciting new writer.

Hemingway is considered one of the greatest American writers. He is often said to be the twentieth century’s most influential writer. Hemingway’s brilliance was tarnished by his selfishness and his lack of feeling for those he trampled. Paula McLain writes adeptly about his character as well as Hadley’s love for Hemingway and her deep hurt. I found this book so very well written and poignant. Hadley’s predicament was movingly portrayed. I found myself intimately pulled into her psyche.

Hadley loved Ernest and was loyal to him until she could not longer feel her own self-worth. It was good to read that after she left Hemingway she found a long lasting love with the journalist Paul Mower.

I highly recommend this book.
Whitehammer
Ernest Hemingway has always frustrated me: his terse writing is compelling, his stories grab you by the scruff and don't let go, and yet his philosophy is dated and jaded. In a documentary about Hemingway and Gary Cooper, who were great friends and men of similar mettle, the point was made that they represented the last of a certain "Teddy Roosevelt" breed of men who were strong, silent, and conflicted. Reading about Hemingway's early life through the eyes of Hadley, his first wife, gave me a new perspective. She relates in first person voice the sweet, playful, and often optimistic qualities in their relationship, saying "what we had was rare and true—and that we were safe in the marriage we had built . . ." But, immersed in the jazz and drinking and wild living of Paris in the 1920s, Hadley and Ernest came to face the stark reality that unraveled their marriage: "Why we couldn't stop drinking or talking or kissing the wrong people no matter what it ruined."

Even knowing the ultimate outcome, the story captivated me. Hadley's descriptions and reactions brought me into their lives, made bohemian Paris sizzle, evoked the bravery and cruelty of Pamplona corridas, brought the sordid and splendid friendships and affairs into keen relief. At times Hadley's passivity frustrated me, yet she held values of an earlier generation, aspiring only to be a good wife and sometimes muse. Ernest's mercurial personality was exposed, his hubris and awesome creativity. Eventually his passion for women, and the inevitable wounds of marriage, pushed him to the affair that ended it, and Hadley caved. Sad, joyful, poignant, truthful, furious, reflective—the story is well written and meaningful to those who have read Hemingway's works, especially The Sun Also Rises.
Gaiauaco
I read this book over the course of a year plus. I honestly believe this has way more to do with my personal/work life than the book itself, but I had to mention that for me this was not a quick read. I enjoyed the beginning a lot, and got caught up in it. I had many troubles getting through parts of the middle which I felt dragged, and were not overly interesting to me. (Bull fighting, all those vacations, visits, etc). Sadly, and someone mentioned this as well, once the inevitable marital strains came about, I was hooked again and finished the book very quickly after that. I found that to be the best writing and the most compelling part of the book, save the beginning. But the end third of the book was my favorite by far.

Overall, I think the writing was good. I think what the author did - the time and effort to get all these details right and truly make a story of such fascinating people come to life - was remarkable. I only read one piece of Hemingway, but I am certainly up for reading more of his work. I was certainly intrigued by their story coming to life in this book. That was something I was not expecting. I found myself drawn in, but also, inevitably sad. I didn't know much about Hemingway or Hadley, and I definitely ruined part of the "story" by researching while I was reading because I was too curious to wait. I really appreciated this effort of research and passion, and I think she did a great job.