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by Lois Phillips Hudson

eBook Reapers of the Dust (Borealis Books) download ISBN: 0873511778
Author: Lois Phillips Hudson
Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press (March 15, 1984)
Language: English
Pages: 189
ePub: 1620 kb
Fb2: 1740 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: doc lit lrf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Lois Phillips Hudson was born in 1927 in Jamestown, North Dakota. Occasionally, in the course of the book, she turns her attention to more profound lessons of growing up and living

Lois Phillips Hudson was born in 1927 in Jamestown, North Dakota. Since 1969 she has taught at the University of Washington in Seattle. Series: Borealis Books. Occasionally, in the course of the book, she turns her attention to more profound lessons of growing up and living. You are invited to read these two consecutive paragraphs of her words that start off a chapter where she quotes 'Johnny Appleseed,' "The boy moves through his life, keeping a shy Watch on the man who now assumes his face.

The Bones of Plenty book. that literary historians of the future will decide that The Bones of Plenty was the farm novel of the Great Drought of the 1920s and 1930s.

Reapers of the Dust book. Start by marking Reapers of the Dust: A Prairie Chronicle as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America’s. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Reapers of the Dust: A Prairie Chronicle as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America’s agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression

Reapers of the Dust book. Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America’s agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression. Reapers of the Dust, now reprinted for a new generation of readers, vividly evokes that difficult time.

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Lois Phillips Hudson, David Guterson. Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression. From Hudson's childhood in North Dakota spring these unusual, moving stories of simple, joyful days, of continuing battles with hostile elements, and of a family's new life as migrant workers on the West Coast

Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression.

Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression. From Hudson's childhood in North Dakota spring these unusual, moving stories of simple, joyful days, of continuing battles with hostile elements, and of a family's new life as migrant workers on the West Coast. Hudson writes with grace and beauty and an abiding understanding of the meaning of those bitter, tragic years.

Lois Phillips Hudson eloquently portrays George Custer, a determined .

Lois Phillips Hudson eloquently portrays George Custer, a determined and angry man who must battle both the land and the landlord; his hard-working wife Rachel; and their young and vulnerable daughter Lucy. Through their compelling story looms a sense of a whole nation's tragedy during the Great Depression. Like the best books of any era, it convinces us of its characters' enduring humanity, and surprises us, again and again, with the depth of emotion it makes us feel. -Minneapolis Star Tribune. At her best, Lois Phillips Hudson can make the American Ordeal of the 1930s so real that you can all but feel the gritty dust in your teeth.

First published in 1965, her childhood recollections of living in North Dakota are what Lois Phillips Hudson used to spin these unusual, moving stories of simple, joyful days and of continuing battles with the hostile elements on the Great Plains during the 1930s. Lois Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression.

First published in 1965, her childhood recollections of living in North Dakota are what Lois Phillips Hudson used to spin these unusual, moving stories of simple, joyful days and of continuing battles with the hostile elements on the Great Plains during the 1930s. Lois Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression.Lois Phillips Hudson is recognized as a major chronicler of America's agricultural heartland during the grim years of the Great Depression. Reapers of the Dust, now reprinted for a new generation of readers, vividly evokes that difficult time. From Hudson's childhood in North Dakota spring these unusual, moving stories of simple, joyful days, of continuing battles with hostile elements, and of a family's new life as migrant workers on the West Coast.
Comments: (4)
Doukree
my relative wrote this so I ordered them for my kids
Goltikree
my relative wrote this so I got it for my children.
Doukasa
Point of clarification: The header says this review is by Kathleen Hudson. The review is by her husband Robert L. Hudson who does not know how to get his name to switch out with her's. Robert Hudson has published other reviews under the name OuthouseBob.

This is a book of vignettes as the author thinks back and forth over her early life and times. Ms Hudson was born in 1927 and the times are from her earliest memories to her early teen years. The life was life in rural North Dakota and Washington State, where she lived back and forth with her family as they tried to make an agricultural living during the days of the depression. She gives you a feel, a real feel for what it was like to be a kid in the cold and heat and dust and despair of North Dakota. She gives you a feel for what it was like in the relatively lush vegetation of Eastern Washington where the family prospered more but generally working for someone else.

Young Lois was very bright but often an outsider. Part of the reason she was an outsider is because she was inside her own head so much. We the reader get the benefit of that inside insight. With her family, she spent time following the crops in agricultural Washington, living in tents and trying to find a place in society where a bright girl could learn while at the same time being proud of earning a silver dollar by the considerable honest sweat of a young brow. Thus, the book as entertainment works, worked for me at least.

Occasionally, in the course of the book, she turns her attention to more profound lessons of growing up and living. You are invited to read these two consecutive paragraphs of her words that start off a chapter where she quotes 'Johnny Appleseed,' "The boy moves through his life, keeping a shy Watch on the man who now assumes his face." :

"While we are growing up, we become more surprised every year that we seem to other people to be changing because to ourselves we seem always to be the same. And even when we exult in the higher mark on the closet door where we are measured every year, we feel an increasing apprehensiveness that a day will come when we will have changed so much that nobody will remember who we are.

Thus, when we are still very young, we sense that our first memories of ourselves constitute the only reality by which we will always understand our existence. The problem is that nobody ever seems to see anything the same way we see it, and therefore the memories by which we place ourselves in time and space can never be verified by anybody else. This is the loneliness and the terror of childhood-not to see things the way anybody else sees them, not to understand why some things are "real" and some things are not."

Perhaps these paragraphs mean more to me than the average reader because I have though on and even written on these kinds of things [e.g., "The Fictional Adult" Etc.: A Review of General Semantics, vol.32 (1975), Number 3, p. 284-286]. I'm not sure Lois and I are saying the same thing but we are laboring in the same part of the soul. For me there was validation of my own poor efforts which I had thought when I wrote was unplowed ground. As I read Ms Hudson I felt that I "really" had stumbled onto something back in the early 1970's that had guided my life and my understanding of others' lives as I attempted to teach and practice psychology.

One last thing must be stated and that is Ms Hudson not only had wonderful experiences as seen through her unique eyes that she shares but also she is a master craftsman with the English language. Ignore the deeper matters if you wish and read this purely as wonderful and entertaining literature. I had never heard of Lois Phillips Hudson but happened upon this book when going through some of my late mother's "stuff." I happened to start reading and couldn't put it down. I am now in the process of ordering a copy of one of Ms Hudson's fiction contributions to literature, Bones of Plenty which has some excellent reviews on Amazon and to which I am looking forward to reading both as literature and introspective psychology
BeatHoWin
The first two chapters of this book are excellent. The second, "Gopher Hunting," begins with a startling generalization on the theme of "the narcissism of minor differences," and then embodies it in the rich detail of girl and boy hunting gophers, and the mother and father back at the house. Not a word that doesn't do its optimal work of proposing, imagining (representing), and guessing.