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eBook Those Across the River download

by Christopher Buehlman

eBook Those Across the River download ISBN: 0441020674
Author: Christopher Buehlman
Publisher: Ace Books; 1 edition (September 6, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 368
ePub: 1886 kb
Fb2: 1776 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf txt mobi lrf
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

The pacing is perfect, and while Buehlman builds up the mystery and suspense, at the same time readers become familiar with the characters

Ships from and sold by BOOK- LAND. The pacing is perfect, and while Buehlman builds up the mystery and suspense, at the same time readers become familiar with the characters. The writing is wonderfully atmospheric, telling all with only a few sentences of description. I was reminded of Shirley Jackson’s style of writing, but Buehlman follows a more classical script of horror. Jackson is more sly and mischievous. The novel appears to be a romance at first.

Christopher Buehlman THOSE ACROSS THE RIVER. For Christeen and Joseph Buehlman, who gave me a home to dream in. HE CAME OUT to see me in the cage because I belonged to him. I was like a new racehorse he still found interesting enough to visit at night, when the others were asleep. He sat there cross-legged on the wet ground, unmindful of the light rain that was falling on him. It wasn’t enough to extinguish his cigar, but it was enough to keep my ruined back waterlogged; enough to make me think my bones were made of cold pewter. I had drifted in and out.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Christopher Buehlman is a writer to watch. I look forward to hearing from him again.

Christopher Buehlman (born 1969 in Tampa, Florida) is a novelist, comedian, playwright, and poet from St. Petersburg, Florida. Christopher Buehlman was born in Tampa, Florida in 1969, to an adolescent young woman originally from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. He was subsequently adopted by Joseph and Christeen Buehlman of Saint Petersburg, Florida. He attended Thom Howard Academy, a school for gifted and special needs students, from 1973 until 1982, when he enrolled at Northeast High School as a sophomore

Those Across the River book.

Those Across the River book. Failed academic Frank Nichols and his wife, Eudora, have.

Christopher Buehlman. My new wife and I were talking in low tones, too excited to sleep, but spent from our last union, while the candle sputtered and made shadows. cked our blanket for the first time in that house. I remember looking once past the curtains and marveling at how beautifully the full moon threw light over the leaves outside. The view from our window looked like a picture-show view. When the screams came even I heard them. Neither one of us moved for a second.

Yes, it’s another Stephen King book-no surprise that he makes the list of scariest books more than once. The premise of this book-a traveling carnival where two young boys meet the malevolent wish-granting Mr. Dark-is pure Bradbury

Yes, it’s another Stephen King book-no surprise that he makes the list of scariest books more than once. This one taps into a phobia that’s both very old and very current: Clowns. Pennywise the killer clown dwells in the sewers of Derry, Maine, and he preys upon the young residents of the town. Dark-is pure Bradbury. Not perhaps his best-known book, but maybe his best.

Cannonball Read IV: Those Across the River by Christopher Buehlman. Buehlman’s novel is set in post-WWI Georgia, to where the narrator Frank, a vet dealing with PTS syndrome, moves with his lover to reclaim a house left to him by a deceased aunt. By PerpetualIntern Books March 1, 2012. I love horror movies and ghost stories. The aunt urges him in a letter to sell the house, because moving to the town would cause Frank nothing but trouble. There’s something terrible in the town, but in true scary story fashion, she doesn’t say what.

Buehlman Christopher. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Those Across the River.

Failed academic Frank Nichols and his wife, Eudora, have arrived in the sleepy Georgia town of Whitbrow, where Frank hopes to write a history of his family's old estate-the Savoyard Plantation- and the horrors that occurred there. At first, the quaint, rural ways of their new neighbors seem to be everything they wanted. But there is an unspoken dread that the townsfolk have lived with for generations. A presence that demands sacrifice.It comes from the shadowy woods across the river, where the ruins of Savoyard still stand. Where a longstanding debt of blood has never been forgotten.A debt that has been waiting patiently for Frank Nichols's homecoming...
Comments: (7)
Ber
I loved this book! But if I describe too much of what the book was about, gentle reader, it might spoil it! Although I do see lots of reviews which explain how the plot falls out, I strongly urge you to not read too many reviews, including mine! The most pertinent issue for readers is the genre of the book - horror. The horror begins late in the book, but when it starts, sensitive readers will probably recoil. The pacing is perfect, and while Buehlman builds up the mystery and suspense, at the same time readers become familiar with the characters. The writing is wonderfully atmospheric, telling all with only a few sentences of description. I was reminded of Shirley Jackson’s style of writing, but Buehlman follows a more classical script of horror. Jackson is more sly and mischievous.

The novel appears to be a romance at first. The narrator, ex-war veteran Orville Frank Nichols, is in love with Eudora Lehman. They are escaping a scandal caused by their falling in love by moving to Whitbrow, a small town in Georgia. They had met during a faculty luncheon, after which they began an affair. When the affair was exposed, Nichols lost his faculty position at the University of M. Eudora filed for divorce from her tenured husband. Once they receive word her divorce has been approved, they intend to marry. Since this is shortly after World War I, they have been telling people they are already married while they live together. Meanwhile, they need new jobs.

Fortuitously, Frank received a letter notifying him he has inherited his aunt’s property in Whitbow. She recommends posthumously that he sell the house immediately in her instructions to him, but of course, he does not. He wants to write a book about one of the previous owners of the house, an ancestor of his who was a notorious slave owner with a reputation of severely abusing his slaves. Eudora, or ‘Dora’, is offered what was the aunt’s job of schoolteacher.

As they happily settle in, meeting the people of the small southern town of Whitbow, they become aware of the town’s superstitious aversion for a nearby area of the Megiddo forest ‘across the river’, as well as an annual event of sending two pigs into that area ceremonially. However, this year the townsfolk are debating whether the ceremony should be held - they are enduring an economic depression and money is scarce. Those two pigs could be sold and eaten by the townsfolk. They decide to do away with the ceremony.

Wrong choice. Very, very, wrong....
Akinohn
I was about to write that if William Faulkner ever wrote a horror novel, it would be very similar to Those Across the River… then I remember that Faulner did write horror novels, of sorts: Sanctuary certainly qualifies, as potentially does Absolam, Absolam. So perhaps easy, pretentious comparisons aren't fair to Buehlman, who has written a Southern Gothic of tremendous quality and originality.

I really can't convey how fully engaged I was while reading this book, having just read a string of so-so horror novels that muted my palate. Reading Buehlman's novel was like eating a delicious hot and spicy curry after dining on nothing but gruel for a month. His prose is exquisite, his character development astounding, and his ability to convey a perfect sense of time and place is to be envied.

The book's narrator, a WWI veteran haunted by his experiences in the trenches, has inherited a plantation estate in rural Georgia in 1935. A former history professor who found himself unemployed and unemployable in his field for an adulterous affair with the wife of a colleague, Frank Nichols moves in with the idea of writing a history of his ancestor who owned the plantation, a murderous slave holder so vile that he refused to free his slaves after the Civil War and was killed by them in retaliation. But writing this history requires him to journey to the plantain ruins, located in a dark stretch of woods across the river… a journey he is advised not to take by the town folk who offer a monthly ritual sacrifice of livestock to whoever--or whatever--lives there.

I hemmed and hawed about whether to write about what lies across the river, as the book has no true twist, but rather gradually builds to the answer to the mystery, and the more well-versed in classic monster lore the reader is, the quicker she or he will figure out what lies in wait there.

Perhaps what most impressed me about this book is the vivid representation of a small Georgia town in the Great Depression, small details in characterization and landscape that bring the book whole and breathing to life. This is no simple pulp horror tale… it is a work of profound insight into the nature of trauma, the hold the land has on those who make their living off of it, and the power of history to haunt the present in powerful and tragic ways. And, above all, it is a story of duty and relationship. The final lines of this wonderful novel have haunted me more than any in recent memory. I just can't recommend this book highly enough. For God's sake, read it!