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eBook Let It Bleed download

by Ian Rankin

eBook Let It Bleed download ISBN: 075280166X
Author: Ian Rankin
Publisher: Orion; First Edition edition (1995)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1989 kb
Fb2: 1787 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf mbr lrf azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Praise for Ian Rankin. While there is an abundance of action in Let It Bleed, it is also, to my mind, rather a soulful book.

Praise for Ian Rankin.

Let it Bleed is a 1995 crime novel by Ian Rankin. It is the seventh of the Inspector Rebus novels. Detective Inspector John Rebus and Frank Lauderdale start the book with a car chase across Edinburgh to apprehend kidnappers, culminating with the two youths they are chasing throwing themselves off the Forth Road Bridge and in Rebus being injured in a car crash.

Born in the Kingdom of Fife in 1960, Ian Rankin graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1982, and then spent three years writing novels when he was supposed to be working towards a PhD in Scottish Literature. Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award.

Publisher: Orion Book, 1995. Detective Inspector John Rebus and Frank Lauderdale start the book with a car chase across Edinburgh, culminating with the two youths they are chasing throwing themselves off the Forth Road Bridge and in Rebus being injured in a car crash. Rebus’ upset over this allows Rankin to show the character in a new light, revealing his isolation and potentially suicidal despair.

There was pressure inside his gum and top lip, a dull, unpleasant sensation that was now spreading either side of his nose.

There was pressure inside his gum and top lip, a dull, unpleasant sensation that was now spreading either side of his nose d beneath the nose – and that could have been the drink or the weather. Whose idea was this?’ he said, folding his arms around himself. They were walking on Portobello beach, the only souls mad enough in this seizure-inducing wind. Mine,’ said Mairie Henderson

Ian Rankin is up there with my favourite authors now. This was a really entertaining book and one which I did not want to put down. Rebus is of course a great character and this story showed all his many parts.

Ian Rankin is up there with my favourite authors now. I was not entirely sure how I felt about a certain scene with a cat but I enjoyed the development of his relationship with his daughter and there was even a hint that his other relationship with alcohol might be improving too.

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). The seventh Inspector Rebus novel from 'Britain's N. crime writer' DAILY MIRROR. Ian Rankin is a regular N. bestseller, and has received numerous. awards, including the prestigious Diamond Dagger. He lives with his family in Edinburgh, and in 2003 received an OBE for his services to literature.

Detective Inspector John Rebus and Frank Lauderdale start the book with a car chase across Edinburgh to apprehend kidnappers, culminating with the two youths they are chasing throwing themselves off the Forth Road Bridge and in Rebus being injured i. .

Detective Inspector John Rebus and Frank Lauderdale start the book with a car chase across Edinburgh to apprehend kidnappers, culminating with the two youths they are chasing throwing themselves off the Forth Road Bridge and in Rebus being injured in a car crash. After the unconnected suicide of a terminally ill con, Rebus pursues an investigation that implicates respected people at the highest levels of government, and due to the politically sensitive nature of what he is doing, faces losing his job, or worse

Discover ideas about Ian Rankin Books. Pines and Peaches: My Year with Agatha: Hercule Poirot Books. 25 Books You Probably Should Have Read Already - Barnes & Noble Reads - Barnes & Noble Reads.

Discover ideas about Ian Rankin Books. Let It Bleed: An Inspector Rebus Mystery (Detective John Rebus Novels) by Ian Rankin. Ian Rankin Books Murder Mystery Books Mystery Thriller Let It Bleed Schuster World Of Books Detective Nonfiction Greed.

The seventh Inspector Rebus novel from 'Britain's N. Struggling through another Edinburgh winter Rebus finds himself sucked into a web of intrigue that throws up more questions than answers

The seventh Inspector Rebus novel from 'Britain's N. Struggling through another Edinburgh winter Rebus finds himself sucked into a web of intrigue that throws up more questions than answers. Was the Lord Provost's daughter kidnapped or just another runaway? Why is a city councillor shredding documents that should have been waste paper years ago? And why on earth is Rebus invited to a clay pigeon shoot at the home of the Scottish Office's Permanent Secretary?

Comments: (7)
Pad
Still reading or re-reading all Rebus books from the beginning. I still like Rebus and his descriptions of Edinburgh, but the book was barely okay. The plot is both convoluted and unbelievable, the ending is over the top. But what annoyed me most are the inconsistencies. . This is not a spoiler, but how come Sammy is staying with Patience, and how did they met? Who is Brian's current girl friend? One gets the feeling that there must have been something - a short story? another book? between this book and the previous one.
Tygrarad
The themes of this fine novel reflect the reality of today's politics and commerce in the United States. The existential anguish that Rebus suffers is a direct consequence of a person with a moral center beset by creatures whose morals have been replaced by a positivist calculus devoid of any sense of people as humans with individual wants, goals and feelings. The tragedy of this tale is the utter helplessness of right in the face of a set of criminal conspiracies that imprison the very institutions designed and adopted to free men and women from the grasp of the aristocrats. The good guys get no win here, but only a pale, enervating draw with the bad guys still in control. Yet, even Flowers ends up doing the right thing by taking a very large personal risk, despite that act being so diminished by his personal greed. Sort of love in the time of Trump.
Zodama
Rankin's Inspector Rebus is flawed, guilt ridden and relentless. Regardless of consequence, Rebus plunges forward with his own future hanging in the balance because he simply has to know why.....something happened.

In this novel, two young men who appear guilty of kidnapping the daughter of a prominent politician act in a way that, at least to Rebus, makes no sense. As Rebus is trying to figure out what happened to these young men, another act of violence occurs that would seem to have no correlation to the situation of the young men. Of course, the more Rebus probes, the more it appears the two dissimilar events have caused tension and those in high places would like Rebus to drop both areas of inquiry.

Music plays a role in this novel, as evidenced by the title, and deadpan, Rebus throws in lines from old Rolling Stones lyrics that may have been forgotten or never noticed: Far be it from me to throw out those clues but they were clever, for sure.

One thing that is truly great about Rankin's Rebus series is that one can pick up a book written in another decade - one you may have read before - but the plots are complex and almost everyone is guilty of something. These are not novels about one detective tracking down a serial killer. Rankin's books are puzzles - perhaps more extreme than the puzzles encountered by readers in their own lives - but the mysteries are not about who did what - but why? What prompts someone to commit suicide for no apparent reason, leaving no note behind? What event prompts a family to implode which from all outward appearances formerly seemed rather mundane and unworthy of any gossip? In the end, Rankin's books show self absorbed, flawed characters.

Rebus is a genius at figuring out complex crimes but has no ability to be in the least bit tactful or crafty as he completely disregards direct orders to cease and desist. All in all, though, Rankin's plots are complex and fun and the reader may actually have to think while reading. And, of course, we hope Rebus will learn to conquer his demons as we hope to conquer our own.
Pettalo
I’ve read the first six and I’ve mostly loved them. Alas, not this.

All those three and four letter Scottish governmental abbreviations: Who could keep up, much less care. And the on-and-off-again cast. The whole plot is a cluster-thingy.

And then Rebus is complicit in killing a pet cat.

That is not a way to make your protagonist sympathetic.
Zepavitta
Story was a bit complicated, involving politics and politicians, civil servants and gangsters. Rebus was very much the drunk, which I don't find amusing and think it detracts from the story because it detracts from his allegedly pristine character--who is constantly called on to make moral choices. More of a procedural than a whodunit.
Hasirri
As someone who is new to the Rebus canon I am slowly reading them in sequence and then I came to Let It Bleed, in my opinion the masterpiece of the series to date.

The song, Let it Bleed by The Rolling Stones is a song of needing to reach the heights and then settling for what you can get. The book is the same, but the get is the smooth stringpuller, Hunter. Hunter is a high level bureaucrat, no doubt the titles have changed in SNP Scotland, who is the center of a web of corruption aimed at making Silicon Glen a contender. In the course of the book Rebus slowly figures it out and ultimately rolls all the dice to get what he needs.
Jeb
This book began with a great line and a great premise. Missing girl, fleeing kidnappers, then oh no....! What now? Rebus seemed to have gotten some of his humanity back and the case was interesting...until it wasn't. Rebus has become almost completely unlikable. The episode with the cat was creepy/sociopathic and really made me wonder why I was still reading because it wasn't for the mystery. I couldn't care less about corruption in the dispersal of tax revenue from the Scottish govt. There were multiple pages about who oversaw what section and who reported to who. By the end Rebus is going through the motions for no real reason, though we are supposed to think he now serves 'justice.' This is the seventh that I've read and I own one more, so I'll make it to eight but unless the main character undergoes a personality shift and the story line is one I can care about...that will be the last.