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eBook The Shelters of Stone (Earth's Children® Series) download

by Sandra Burr,Jean M. Auel

eBook The Shelters of Stone (Earth's Children® Series) download ISBN: 1611064600
Author: Sandra Burr,Jean M. Auel
Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (January 25, 2011)
Language: English
ePub: 1511 kb
Fb2: 1643 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc lrf docx azw
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Start reading The Shelters of Stone (Earth's Children Book 5) on your Kindle in under a minute. I was not as keen on this book as I was the earlier ones in the series. I loved the landscape descriptions and all of the information about society and the ceremonies and stuff.

Start reading The Shelters of Stone (Earth's Children Book 5) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Jean M. Auel’s enthralling Earth’s Children® series has become a literary phenomenon, beloved by readers . Jean Auel is at her very best in this superbly textured creation of a prehistoric society. Auel’s enthralling Earth’s Children® series has become a literary phenomenon, beloved by readers around the world. In a brilliant novel as vividly authentic and entertaining as those that came before, Jean M. Auel returns us to the earliest days of humankind and to the captivating adventures of the courageous woman called Ayla.

The Shelters of Stone book. The Shelters of Stone. HOWEVER, the Transylvania accent that she suddenly gives Ayla in this book is TOO MUCH. Somehow, it made her even MORE annoying, MORE Mary Sue-ish, AND MORE vampy. I just have one question: HOW THE [email protected] DID THIS GET PUBLISHED?!?!!!?!?

The Earth's Children Series 6-Book Bundle: The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of Horses, The Mammoth .

The Earth's Children Series 6-Book Bundle: The Clan of the Cave Bear, The Valley of Horses, The Mammoth Hunters, The Plains of Passage, The Shelters of Stone, The Land of Painted Caves. A literary phenomenon, Jean M. Auel’s prehistoric odyssey is one of the best-loved sagas of our time.

The Shelters of Stone. Written by Jean M. Auel. Narrated by Sandra Burr. Of the other four books in the series, this one was the best so far. It didn't dwell unnecessarily with issues of salvaging animals for multiple purposes, but was very interesting and quick moving

The Shelters of Stone. It didn't dwell unnecessarily with issues of salvaging animals for multiple purposes, but was very interesting and quick moving.

Earth's Children is a series of epic historical fiction novels written by Jean M. Auel set circa 30,000 years before present. There are six novels in the series

Earth's Children is a series of epic historical fiction novels written by Jean M. There are six novels in the series. Auel had previously mentioned in interviews that there would be a seventh novel, but publicity announcements for the sixth confirmed it would be the final book in the sequence. The series is set in Europe during the Upper Paleolithic era, after the date of the first ceramics discovered, but before the last advance of glaciers.

The Shelters of Stone (Earth's Children Jean M. Year Published: 2002. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Year Published: 2011.

The Shelters of Stone: Earth's Children by Jean M. Auel (Paperback, 2003). Place of Publication. General & Literary Fiction. The Shelters of Stone by Jean M. Auel (Paperback, 2010). The Mammoth Hunters by Jean M. Auel (Paperback, 2002). The Land of Painted Caves by Jean M. Auel (Paperback, 2011). Earth's Children S. Pagination.

In her Earth’s Children series, novelist Jean M. Auel brings to life fictional characters from a long-vanished, Ice Age-era Earth. In this podcast, the author discusses her latest book The Land of Painted Caves, and describes some of the real-life archaeological finds that informed her work

In her Earth’s Children series, novelist Jean M. In this podcast, the author discusses her latest book The Land of Painted Caves, and describes some of the real-life archaeological finds that informed her work. In her Earth’s Children series, novelist Jean M. In this podcast, the author discusses her latest book The Land of Painted Caves, and describes some of the real-life archaeological finds that informed her work

Book 5 of the Earth's Children® Series Jean Auel is at her very best in this superbly textured creation of a prehistoric society.

Book 5 of the Earth's Children® Series. Auel may be creating one of the most believable characters in English fiction-one to rank with Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara and a handful of others.

In this triumphant volume, the courageous Ayla and her beloved Jondalar, along with their animal friends Wolf, Whinney, and Racer, have completed their epic journey across Europe and are greeted by Jondalar’s people, the Zelandonii. These people of the Ninth Cave fascinate Ayla, and in their spiritual leader―the woman who initiated Jondalar into the Gift of Pleasure―she finds a fellow healer with whom to share her knowledge.

But as Ayla and Jondalar prepare for their formal mating at the Summer Meeting, there are difficulties. Not all the Zelandonii are welcoming. Some fear Ayla’s unfamiliar ways and her relationship with the Clan, openly opposing her union with Jondalar.

Now Ayla must call on all her wisdom and instincts to find her place in this complicated society, to prepare for the birth of her child, and to decide on the role she is to play in shaping the destiny of the Zelandonii.

Fifth in the acclaimed Earth’s Children® series

Comments: (7)
Snake Rocking
I read all of the Earth's Children books in the series. The first one was pretty good and the subsequent ones had interesting premises and characters, but Ms Auel's habit of cut & pasting many frequently occurring descriptions became soooo irritating and predictable and distracting, that it very much detracted from my enjoyment of the book. I understand that in a series, you may have to repeat descriptions of things, events and people for the benefit of readers who may not have read all the earlier books in the series, but Ms Auel repeated many descriptions word-for-word over and over within each book. For example, the 1st time anyone meets the heroine we are once again subjected to her interlocutor's unspoken musings about her strange accent which "wasn't quite like and accent but more like she was swallowing some of the sounds as she spoke." Then the author AGAIN explains that this peculiar manner of speech was due to her having been raised by flatheads who call themselves "clan." I could name 15 or 20 more examples of these pointless, tedious word-for-word cut & paste descriptions (e.g., regarding their love-making details, how she learned to hunt, who raised her and what a Medicine Woman is, why/how she got her pet horse and lion, ad nauseam.) It was really the worst example of lazy writing I have ever read, and very much spoiled what could have been a really fun read.
The_NiGGa
I agree completely with the review stating "REPETITION" ad nauseam. Having read previous books in this series, I am heartily disappointed. Very little story so far (I'm 15% into the tome). The only good thing I can say is "thank goodness I only paid for the Kindle edition", keeping my wasted money to a minimum. If there's anything new and interesting in this book, I've yet to come across it. I skip page after page after page of redundant detail about the terrain, climate and so forth. If Ms Auel is attempting to equal James A. Michener's abilities, she falls waaaaay short.

Boring and a waste of time.

2/21/15
Finally finished the book. Where things actually happen, it's fascinating, but much too much repetitious writing about the terrain and ways/means of making the tools needed to survive. My view is that about 2/3 of the book could have been eliminated to make an exciting novel. The only thing that saves it is the ability to skip rapidly forward every time the author gets into the stuff repeated from previous novels or even through previous sections of this book. My rating is changed to 2 stars, about 1/3 of possible stars, as about 1/3 of the novel held my interest.
Ynye
This whole series is so fuggin good I read the whole series in what might be record time. Then I got to this book and it was a huge let down. Though the book is decent you can tell by how it's written it wasn't suppose to be the last book. That's the free pass I'm going to give it because if not then this author went from an amazing writer to a horrible one over the span of one book. Which I think is highly unlikely unless there is another unforeseen event that prevented her from preforming at her usual. Do I discourage you from reading it? Definitely not and how could you if you loved the series as much as I did.
Honeirsil
12/14/2013 6:36am The Shelters of Stone Jean Auel (Spoiler)
I read all six volumes in this series, the original book "The Clan of Cave Bear" is the best of the series, I'm unable to review this book without mentioning the whole series briefly. This fifth in the series follows, the fourth book "The Plains of Passage," the two main characters Ayla and Jondalar finally reach their destination in Zelandonii in south central France (his birth/home) after traveling for one year across rough terrain and crossing a dangerous glacier, from the Eastern European territory, the Danube River, the Ukraine, the Black Sea, Germany. When they finally arrive in Jondalar's home, the book doesn't really know what to do with the characters except mention a few people and never fully develops them or has them contribute to the story in any meaningful way. The author repeats things so often, I had a tendency to yell out you already said that, ad nauseam. The title of this book, "The Shelters of Stone" indicates a period of history that is unknown, who lived in the stone dwellings previously? There is a hint that the Cro-Magnons may have pushed out the Neanderthals, years before, they have cave drawings that were made hundreds of years earlier and they kept drawing right on top of the previous ones. A group of residents, who are suppose to be some sort of spiritual advisers have control over what these people are suppose to believe, how they live their lives. These people have no clue to what they are talking about because they don't know anything. When Ayla asks what does this cave drawing mean, the head witch-doctor replies, 'what do you think it means?' Ayla knows this early-cave-dwelling hippie-witch has no idea what it is, and this hippie seems bent on taking hallucinogenic potions, teas in order to visit the world beyond and try to scare the crap out of her fearful residents. A major disappointment.