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by Benjamin Markovits

eBook A Quiet Adjustment: A Novel download ISBN: 0393067009
Author: Benjamin Markovits
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st American Ed edition (September 17, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1698 kb
Fb2: 1415 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf doc azw doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction

A Quiet Adjustment: A Novel Paperback – October 19, 2009. Markovits's choice of an ornate Jamesian style captures every nuance of Annabella's shift from the victimized wife to the sinister deliberateness of the vengeful ex-spouse.

A Quiet Adjustment: A Novel Paperback – October 19, 2009. by. Benjamin Markovits (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Book 2 of 3 in the Lord Byron Series.

A Quiet Adjustment book. A first-rate example of a literary historical novel  . Inspired by the actual biography of Lord Byron-the greatest literary figure and most notorious sex symbol of his age-Markovits A first-rate example of a literary historical novel. Regan Upshaw, San Francisco Chronicle.

Also by Benjamin Markovits The Syme Papers Fathers and Daughters Imposture CONTENTS Begin reading. A quiet adjustment, .

Markovits deals rather triumphantly with the matter of sex.

He seems a glum drunkard, mired in unexplained self-pity. Markovits deals rather triumphantly with the matter of sex. Sex is at the heart of the story, and not only because we are following the thoughts of a young virgin who marries a libertine, pondering "the contact that awaited her". It is also because the bond between Byron and Augusta, Annabella begins to realise, goes as far as "something horrible".

A Quiet Adjustment is the second novel in a proposed trilogy. Markovits’s narrative is presented in a third-person voice that seems to arise from Annabella herself. The first, Imposture, featured John Polidori, Byron’s private physician, who went about pretending to be his employer. In that book, Byron remained in the shadows, an oblique presence. Here he is eminently visible, seen through his wife’s startled and (ultimately) horrified gaze.

In Fall we see the tentative beginnings of an unlikely romance - between schoolteacher Amy and drifting former graduate, Charles. In Winter we hear how her colleague Howard learns, seventeen years too late, that he has a daughter following a brief fling with collegemate Annie. The Times (London)Growing up in Texas, Ben experienced basketball as a mostly solitary pursuit, one he gave up after riding the bench in high school.

With Imposture, the first novel in his Byron trilogy, Markovits gave us a glimpse of his anti-hero through the .

With Imposture, the first novel in his Byron trilogy, Markovits gave us a glimpse of his anti-hero through the eyes of his physician, John Polidori, who briefly impersonates him. Byron’s fame secured bestseller status for Polidori’s novella The Vampyre, supposed to have been written by Byron himself. Where will Markovits’s final novel in the trilogy take him? Into Byron’s head to show how fame corrodes from the inside? On the evidence of the first two novels, Markovits would manage such a task with ease.

Books related to A Quiet Adjustment: A Novel.

In the first novel it was John Polidori, Byron’s doctor; A Quiet Adjustment is seen from the point of view of Annabella Milbanke, Byron’s wife. We first meet her in 1812, when, at 19, she is taking advantage of the London season to consider matrimonial prospects. Rejecting offers from several respectable suitors, she becomes fascinated by the disreputable Byron, whose Childe Harold is the talk of fashionable.

A Novel by Markovits, Benjamin (Paperback book, 2009). item 2 A Quiet Adjustment by Benjamin Markovits (English) Paperback Book Free Shipping!

A Novel by Markovits, Benjamin (Paperback book, 2009). item 3 A Quiet Adjustment. A Novel by Markovits, Benjamin (Paperback book, 2009) -A Quiet Adjustment. A Novel by Markovits, Benjamin (Paperback book, 2009). item 4 Quiet Adjustment by Markovits, Benjamin -Paperback -Quiet Adjustment by Markovits, Benjamin -Paperback.

A psychological thriller of passionate attachment and emotional cruelty, involving a love triangle between Lord Byron, his half-sister, and his wife.

To dissolve a dreadfully mistaken union between two formidable egos: surely it should only take "a quiet adjustment"? Inspired by the actual biography of Lord Byron―the greatest literary figure and most notorious sex symbol of his age―Benjamin Markovits reimagines Byron's marriage to the capable, intellectual, and tormented Annabella and the scandal that broke open their lives and riveted the world around them: Byron's incestuous relationship with his impetuous half-sister, Gus. Their very different understandings of love and obligation lead them all―and the reader―headlong to a devastating conclusion.Acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic for his memorable prose and acute sense of character, Markovits here sets a new standard for the literary historical novel. A Quiet Adjustment is at once immersed in its period, an homage to Byron and his work, and a thoroughly modern fiction in the psychologically incisive vein of Ian McEwan and Colm Tóibín.
Comments: (5)
Winail
It is a joy to read Markovits well crafted pages. Many of his characters that I know from history take on depth from the dialogues and inner thoughts the author has created.
Felolv
When I read this in a two-star review, I laughed loudly: It is only too obvious that this was written by a dreary academician schooled in the obtuse writing style of Henry James' later works. Nothing can be plainly said in this dreadful book where pages of obscure and vague meanderings substitute for a felicity of expression. To put it quite plainly this book is a total bore.
And I will tell you why...
This is a parody--a truly brilliant parody--on Henry James. Trust me, no reader can arrive on page 6 (having read page 5 being my assumption) without realizing what Benjamin Markovtiz is doing. The author is brilliant. Poor Annabella, fearing she would be "getting butter on her fingers" must face a big decision: will she or will she not attend the waltzing party to which she has been invited? A waltzing party? How funny. And to think it comes after breakfast. No, not after lunch, not after tea, but after breakfast. Would we not all have a similar dilemma were we to have been invited to a waltzing party for after breakfast? Not for IHOP folks! And then, of course, she will be meeting Lord Byron whose new rather large poem has just been published. And the poor darling has not read it!
Oh, my, and it only gets better and better...
I am laughing as I write this. This is just such a brilliant book.
Painwind
Lady Byron's side of the story is told for the first time and though it lacks authenticity, it makes a good novel. Annabella believes she can save George Noel Gordon; he believes it is too late. As in real life, rumors and insinuations condemn the poet and his sister Augusta without proof. I don't know the truth of Byron's affair with Augusta; Annabella comes across here as a woman striving to be a good wife, not the shrew as depicted by the poet's friends; indeed, she does her best to accommodate her husband's many appetites. In her failure, her manipulations of Augusta are well within her character as described and believable. Good people rarely feel qualms doing evil to others perceived as evil-doers. I've had no sympathy for Lady B based on all the accounts of the marriage but Markovits has captured a plausible explanation of Annabella and thereby adds depth to the legend of Byron. The stilted language to simulate the literature of the time can be awkwardly tedious but, as the ménage a trois becomes en famile, the style fades to the background.
Erienan
This is the story of Lord Byron's courtship, brief marriage and separation from Annabella Millbanke, as viewed through Anabella's own eyes. The depiction is of a Byron who is a drunken, despicable, manipulative and selfish beast who torments his loving and patient wife. Underlying all this is his wife's suspicion of the incestuous relationship between Byron and his half-sister, Augusta Leigh.

It is only too obvious that this was written by a dreary academician schooled in the obtuse writing style of Henry James' later works. Nothing can be plainly said in this dreadful book where pages of obscure and vague meanderings substitute for a felicity of expression. To put it quite plainly this book is a total bore.
Nidora
A dreary, slowly paced literary novel. There is not one likable character in this book. Markovits gives Byron a pale slice of sympathy, but all in all the attempt fails.